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Laguna Canyon Foundation

 P.O. Box 4895
 Laguna Beach, CA 92652
[P] (949) 497-8324
[F] --
www.lagunacanyon.org
[email protected]
Hallie Jones
FOUNDED: 1990
INCORPORATED: 1990
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Employer Identification Number 33-0441816 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

Laguna Canyon Foundation is dedicated to preserving, protecting, enhancing and promoting the South Coast Wilderness – a network of open space that includes Laguna Coast Wilderness Park and Aliso & Wood Canyons Wilderness Park in Orange County, California. 

 

Laguna Canyon Foundation provides a multitude of programs to continue the protection and preservation of our canyons:
  • Restoration - We initiate, coordinate and implement habitat restoration and trail maintenance projects.
  • Education - We provide quality educational opportunities to both local Title 1 schools and Laguna Beach public schools.
  • Volunteer Outreach - We offer diverse opportunities for the public to give back to their community: everything from hands-on habitat restoration, to leading interpretive hikes, to assisting visitors at the Nix Nature Center.
  • Land Acquisition - We continue to identify key parcels for preservation, negotiate land transfers, and ensure land is preserved in perpetuity.
  • Public Education - We offer free public guided hikes, bike rides, and special events that allow park users to enjoy the open space in a safe and responsible way.
  • Advocacy - We work with governing bodies and the local environmental community to protect and preserve our open space.

 

Mission Statement

Laguna Canyon Foundation is dedicated to preserving, protecting, enhancing and promoting the South Coast Wilderness – a network of open space that includes Laguna Coast Wilderness Park and Aliso & Wood Canyons Wilderness Park in Orange County, California. 

 

Laguna Canyon Foundation provides a multitude of programs to continue the protection and preservation of our canyons:
  • Restoration - We initiate, coordinate and implement habitat restoration and trail maintenance projects.
  • Education - We provide quality educational opportunities to both local Title 1 schools and Laguna Beach public schools.
  • Volunteer Outreach - We offer diverse opportunities for the public to give back to their community: everything from hands-on habitat restoration, to leading interpretive hikes, to assisting visitors at the Nix Nature Center.
  • Land Acquisition - We continue to identify key parcels for preservation, negotiate land transfers, and ensure land is preserved in perpetuity.
  • Public Education - We offer free public guided hikes, bike rides, and special events that allow park users to enjoy the open space in a safe and responsible way.
  • Advocacy - We work with governing bodies and the local environmental community to protect and preserve our open space.

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $1,319,600.00
Projected Revenue $1,712,600.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Restoration
  • Education
  • Public Programs/Volunteers
  • Trail Maintenance

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

Laguna Canyon Foundation is dedicated to preserving, protecting, enhancing and promoting the South Coast Wilderness – a network of open space that includes Laguna Coast Wilderness Park and Aliso & Wood Canyons Wilderness Park in Orange County, California. 

 

Laguna Canyon Foundation provides a multitude of programs to continue the protection and preservation of our canyons:
  • Restoration - We initiate, coordinate and implement habitat restoration and trail maintenance projects.
  • Education - We provide quality educational opportunities to both local Title 1 schools and Laguna Beach public schools.
  • Volunteer Outreach - We offer diverse opportunities for the public to give back to their community: everything from hands-on habitat restoration, to leading interpretive hikes, to assisting visitors at the Nix Nature Center.
  • Land Acquisition - We continue to identify key parcels for preservation, negotiate land transfers, and ensure land is preserved in perpetuity.
  • Public Education - We offer free public guided hikes, bike rides, and special events that allow park users to enjoy the open space in a safe and responsible way.
  • Advocacy - We work with governing bodies and the local environmental community to protect and preserve our open space.

 


Background Statement

Since 1990, Laguna Canyon Foundation has been dedicated to preserving, protecting, enhancing and promoting the South Coast Wilderness – a network of open space that includes Laguna Coast Wilderness Park and Aliso & Wood Canyons Wilderness Park in Orange County, California.

Following the historic events of the November 1989 March to Save Laguna Canyon and the passage of the twenty-million-dollar bond measure by Laguna Beach voters in November 1990, Laguna Canyon Foundation was formed to help with the preservation of Laguna Canyon. Together with the City of Laguna Beach, County of Orange, and the State of California, Laguna Canyon Foundation purchased sections of the canyon slated for development, and established Laguna Coast Wilderness Park in 1993. The partnership continues with the nationally recognized James and Rosemary Nix Nature Center and interpretive exhibits, and the more than 150 Laguna Canyon Foundation volunteers who help OC Parks manage these unique coastal canyons.

Our work and services reach all user groups, including hikers, mountain bikers, birders, photographers and general outdoor enthusiasts. With a staff of eight full time employees, five part-time seasonal employees, and an army of volunteers, we provide a multitude of programs to aid in the protection and preservation of our canyons.

  


 

 


Impact Statement

  • Restoration

Currently we're involved in 17 different projects with budgets totaling over $3 million. These projects include annual channel clearance for flood control, assisting the Laguna Beach Fire Department with fuel modification, emergent invasive species control, sensitive species transplants, and various habitat mitigation and restoration projects covering over 100 acres.

  • Trails

Laguna Canyon Foundation’s Trail Program restores, repairs, maintains and builds single track trails throughout Laguna Coast and Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Parks. From FY 2014-15 to 2015-16, we more than doubled the number of our volunteer trail events, and more than quadrupled the number of unique volunteers participating. In FY 2016-17, our staff and volunteers completed over 1000 hours of trailwork on 15 different trails. Among other accomplishments, we improved or maintained 1600 linear feet of tread and cleared 21,500 linear feet (over four miles) of brush off our trails.

  • Outreach

In 2017 our small staff and army of volunteers led 159 free hikes and rides for over 1,300 park users.

  • Education   

Each year, 4,700 students from our twelve Title 1 Santa Ana partner schools enjoy free educator-guided field trips into our two parks. 

While the overarching theme of each trip is environmental conservation, each grade has a specific focus to connect and engage with the children on their level and build upon what they learn in the classroom. As they hike the trails, full of native plant and animal life, the children begin to develop a love and respect of nature and learn that they, too, not only belong in the open space, but have a responsibility to protect and preserve it. We teach them how.


 


Needs Statement

Our top needs are as follows:
  • Meeting our $1,800,000 capital campaign goal to build the Laguna Canyon Foundation Wilderness Center at the historic DeWitt Property, just off Laguna Canyon Road. When complete, the Wilderness Center will include an Education Amphitheater to provide seating for our volunteer trainings, public programs, and educational seminars; a Native Plant Teaching Garden featuring a range of native plants, shrubs and trees and interpretive signage; a connection to Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park's Stairsteps Trail, located adjacent to the property; and the Massen Greene House, a new headquarters with office space for our staff and volunteers and meeting rooms for wildlife agencies and partnering nonprofits.
  • Volunteer support - We are always in need of volunteers as Wilderness Access Volunteers, hike and program leaders, office assistants, and more.
  • Habitat Restoration - We welcome restoration volunteers as well as financial support.
  • Trail Maintenance - With heavy trail use comes much needed trail maintenance.  As with habitat restoration, we welcome volunteer assistance as well as financial support.
  • General Operating Expenses - Donating to our general fund allows us the freedom to use your donation where it is needed most. 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Donating to LCF: All donations to LCF are gratefully accepted and acknowledged. Donations can be mailed to our PO Box, dropped at main entrances at Laguna Coast Wilderness Park and Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park, or made online at lagunacanyon.org/donate. Volunteers are always needed for long term or short term projects. Come join our volunteer base of over 150 volunteers or come out for a morning of protecting what you love. Go to lagunacanyon.org/volunteer for more information.

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
South Orange County
Laguna Canyon Foundation is a community-based nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving, protecting, enhancing, and promoting the South Coast Wilderness. Located in south Orange County, California, the 22,000-acre wilderness area includes Laguna Coast and Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Parks, Crystal Cove State Park, and the City of Irvine Open Space Preserve.

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
  2. Environment - Environmental Education
  3. Environment - Alliances & Advocacy

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Programs


Restoration

Laguna Canyon Foundation is dedicated to restoring and preserving healthy, functional native ecosystems and wildlife habitats that encourage biodiversity. We restore habitats by removing invasive species and planting and tending native vegetation in and around the South Coast Wilderness. We also oversee local resource management projects to ensure that impacts to sensitive habitat are minimized. Restoration also improves viewsheds and recreation opportunities, building a connection between residents and the local environment.

Budget  445,000
Category  Environment, General/Other Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

Complete mitigation of water tank ravine burn site at 1.5 acre DeWitt property through tasks including planting of native species, weed management, and irrigation.

Complete restoration of Boat Canyon and Caribbean Drive properties through weed management and planting of native species.

Establish a wildlife corridor of native vegetation between the Laguna Greenbelt/ South Coast Wilderness and other Orange County open space to encourage migration. Corridors help local wildlife find genetically diverse mates, and may help facilitate the reestablishment of wildlife populations in areas where they have been reduced or eliminated due to fires or disease.

Complete removal of invasive Arundo donax from 19.7-mile Aliso Creek and begin planting of native riparian species, including native willow, wild rose, and blackberry. New native species planted will help to support the myriad wildlife that depend on a healthy creek and improve water quality and open space viewsheds for the public.

Program Long-Term Success 

Degraded habitats will be restored to functionality through planned removal and management of invasive species. Invasive species management will be prioritized based on Natural Community Coalition protocols to maximize effectiveness and prevent newly introduced species from gaining a local foothold.

Restoration volunteers will be educated and engaged in habitat restoration and protection, leading to increased stewardship tendencies and a greater stake in preservation.

We will continue to increase connectivity between wild areas through the acquisition and restoration of functional wildlife corridors.

LCF will become a recognized leader in restoration and a respected source of information on best management practices, leading to more widespread use of effective management.

Our native plant nursery will encourage buy-in to organization goals and community involvement in restoration. We will continue to grow the nursery program and increase capacity, allowing increased volunteer involvement.

Program Success Monitored By 

Number of acres under active restoration

Number of active restoration projects

Number of unique restoration volunteers engaged and annual restoration volunteer hours

Frequency and tone of press coverage as a bellwether of local support

Increased capacity through additional staff

Examples of Program Success 

LCF has been involved in multiple habitat restoration and vegetation management projects this year, ranging in size from one to 55 acres. We are currently managing 17 different restoration projects. Our goal is to restore high quality, sustainable habitat for local wildlife as well as to improve the experience of the public who use our local open space for recreation.

Our Restoration Program was awarded a grant of nearly $700,000 to fund habitat restoration at Pecten Reef in Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park, the latest of over a dozen ongoing restoration projects throughout the parks and the City of Laguna Beach.  

The 3.7-acre City-owned Big Bend property in Laguna Canyon was transformed from a dirt lot into a vibrant community wildlife corridor at the gateway to Laguna’s downtown. The property was restored with native oaks, sycamores and coastal sage scrub, as well as public trails that provide improved public access to more than 20,000 acres of adjacent open space.



Education

The South Coast Wilderness Education Program brings over 4,500 students per year from urban Title 1 schools into Orange County's Laguna Coast and Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Parks. Our Next Generation Science Standards-based field trips foster a sense of environmental stewardship, connect the children to the land, and inspire the next generation of conservationists. To make the program affordable for all students, we cover the complete cost of the program, including busing costs, lesson materials, field instructors, snacks and supplies. We partner with twelve schools, bringing the children into the parks each year from second to fifth grade.

Our General Education Program provides Next Generation Science Standards-based field trips to Laguna Beach schools. Private schools, scout troops, and home school groups are also welcome, though we charge a nominal fee to cover our costs. Topics can vary depending on teacher interest, and are often tailored to the specific class.
Budget  116,500
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

Often, urban school districts host environmental organizations at the schools themselves to share geology items, pelts, soils, and the like. We believe that creating a lasting connection with and understanding of the natural world requires experiencing the wilderness itself. The South Coast Wilderness Education Program brings children into the wilderness parks, where they hike on actual trails, experience the sights, sounds, and smells of nature, and engage in experiential learning, using some of the same tools (pelts, skulls, leaf rubbings) as well as the natural world itself - rock formations, native plants, evidence of wildlife, and various soils on the trails. Amid hiking, we stop for games, keeping the children engaged and excited about the open space. If children are less able (we regularly host deaf or hard of hearing children, non-English speakers, and children in wheelchairs), we accommodate them with a shorter or alternate hike, flash cards, or even a tour through Laguna Coast Wilderness Park's award-winning Nix Nature Center.

If we find that a particular group is eager to hike more, and if time allows, we might take them a little further beyond our usual hike to Barbara's Lake to a "special oak oasis" where they can imagine being Native Americans 200 years ago. We adapt each trip to the specific class' energy, level of knowledge, and interests to make the hikes meaningful, educational, and special for every student.
As one field instructor said, "It is never boring."
As the plants and animals adapt, so do we, because each grade, each trip, and each child is unique, and we want to make their trip as memorable and enjoyable as we possibly can.
Program Long-Term Success 
Laguna Canyon Foundation and our partner elementary schools have worked together for the past ten years to bring our local children (less than 16 miles away) to the wilderness year after year. We select these schools because they are our neighbors whose students have as much of a right to experience and enjoy the wilderness parks as their Laguna Beach counterparts, because they are often underserved with regards to wilderness adventures and access to the open space, and because the teachers and principals are committed to providing enriching, enjoyable outdoor experiences for their students.
Our goal is to host the children year after year, reinforcing messages of conservation and environmental stewardship and helping them develop a lasting relationship with the wilderness. Ideally, a student who remains at one of our partner schools would visit the parks each year through second, third, fourth and fifth grade. As we've been able to witness firsthand over the program's ten years, this truly connects the children to the land, encouraging a sense of appreciation and responsibility for the open space and helping to create future conservationists.

At this time there are no other organizations that provide educational opportunities for underserved youth in Orange County’s South Coast Wilderness areas. There are some other organizations that focus on Orange County intertidal regions and wetlands; however, they are still not able to provide the free access to underserved youth that the Foundation does.

Program Success Monitored By 

Our partner schools work with our program staff to schedule trips, prepare the students for the field trips beforehand, recruit chaperones, and follow up with surveys to assess the children's experiences and lessons learned. Without the support of the principals, teachers and parents, we could not coordinate all the trips we do. Our follow-up surveys allow us to collect teacher and student feedback so that we can improve our programs, and allow us to measure student retention of the lessons taught.

Examples of Program Success 
Presently, we host over 75 field trips (2nd through 5th grade) from our twelve Title 1 partner schools throughout the school year. We restrict each field trip to 60 students maximum, reaching over 4,500 students per year. This ensures an engaging experience for each child while protecting our open space from overuse. Our curriculum is based on Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and we teach art in nature, geology, fitness, citizen science and adaptations, and, of course, conservation and preservation.
 
For many students, our field trips may be the students' first or only exposure to the open space. Children learn grade specific, science-based lessons in a natural environment. Reactions from the students include:
 
“I really enjoyed the birds. I want to save the animals. I will never forget to save the wild life.” - Ruben
 
“Thank you for making it possible for us to visit Aliso Wood Canyons. I want to exercise more.” - Malena
 
“Thank you for inviting us to your beautiful mountain...I learned about herbivores, carnivores, prey and predators.” - Sergio
 
“I enjoyed the activity when we compared the cactus to the “taco” plant. It was great fun to work together with the sponges to see which plant was better adapted to retain water.” - Iris

Public Programs/Volunteers

Our volunteer program offers diverse opportunities to give back to the community – everything from hands-on habitat restoration to leading interpretive hikes to to assisting visitors at the Nix Nature Center. Our objectives this year include: 
 
• Providing training and orientation opportunities for volunteers.
• Developing an interpretive plan for our stewardship program to better connect people to the big picture of restoration.
• Continuing to recognize volunteers and ensure volunteer retention.
Budget  97,000
Category  Public, Society Benefit, General/Other Citizen Participation Programs
Population Served General/Unspecified Adults Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 

• 60 restoration stewardship events over the next year (18 weekend "Keep It Wild" restoration events, 18 weekday restoration events, 24 native plant nursery volunteer days)
• Over 300 guided hikes and events led by our volunteers, with staff support and training as needed
• Regular volunteer orientations, as needed
• Land steward training for volunteers to learn about habitat restoration, invasive plants and habitat monitoring
• Invasive plant “Early Detection Rapid Response” training
• Improved outreach and marketing, with a focus on designing fun, rewarding, and meaningful events and opportunities for our volunteers

Program Long-Term Success 

Our volunteer program as a whole has been successful for many years, but we are always looking towards the future. Our planned outcomes include:

• Better trained, invested, dedicated volunteers, able to pass on a consistent message of environmental awareness, appreciation, and responsibility to our visitors, with a full understanding of Laguna Canyon Foundation's mission and everyday work.
• An educated, engaged public, benefiting from the knowledge and enthusiasm of our volunteer hike leaders, Wilderness Access Volunteers, and others.

 

Program Success Monitored By 
• Number of events offered
• Number of new and returning participants
• Relative popularity of events/hikes offered, in order to focus or improve our programming
• Number of bags of trash collected
• Number of weeds pulled/estimate of area
• Number of plants installed
• Number of plants that survive
• Number of plants grown in the nursery
• Number of volunteers who sign up for our mailing list or remain with the program long-term
Examples of Program Success  In the past few years, we have expanded our volunteer program from 40 programs offered per year to over 150. We consistently strive to improve our programs, responding to visitor feedback to ensure that we continue to offer our most popular programs. We have recently expanded our volunteer program to include regular opportunities for restoration stewardship. Laguna Canyon Foundation's community-based environmental stewardship program helps participants connect with nature through hands-on habitat restoration activities. Rather than simply observing the natural world, or seeing landscapes through the window of a car, restoration-based activities allow participants to directly impact the ecosystem. Volunteers are a part of the entire habitat restoration process, from planting seeds in the nursery, to planting the seedlings in the ground, to caring for the growing plants

Trail Maintenance

Trail usage in Laguna Coast and Aliso & Wood Canyons Wilderness Parks has increased exponentially in the past few years, threatening the viability of important habitat. Laguna Canyon Foundation and Orange County Parks staff work together to minimize human impacts, protect habitat, and foster community investment in the trails and harmony between different trail user groups (i.e. hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrian users).

LCF staff and volunteers work with OC Parks staff to maintain and improve the trails. The trail systems in these parks are a tremendous resource to the communities surrounding them, allowing people to get out and enjoy nature in a variety of ways.

We take a holistic view of our authorized trail system and prioritize the most urgent trail projects. We look at surrounding habitat and impacts to wildlife, make the trails more sustainable by keeping people on the trail and getting water off the trail, and design trails so they're fun and safe for everyone.

Budget  70,000
Category  Recreation & Sports, General/Other Public Parks & Recreational Trails
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 

An average of 15 volunteers assist with trail maintenance and simple reconstruction projects twice a month. LCF works with local mountain bike clubs to put on 2-3 larger events coordinated with national volunteer days (30-50 volunteers per event).

Trail classification and prioritization system finalized with Park Staff and classification of existing trails begun. Documents summarizing maintenance needs on park singletrack trails created. Foot-by-foot inventories and work plans for top 10 prioritized trails completed.

LCF established as the leading organization for addressing trail-related issues in the Parks, building participation for our volunteer program and recruiting donors for future trail projects. Additional Trail Maintenance Volunteers recruited.

Trail Program Manager and Consultant to attend 3rd Trail Maintenance and Management Program training in 2016. Leadership training for a small number of dedicated trail maintenance volunteers developed and executed with OC Parks staff.

Program Long-Term Success 

All singletrack trails will be classified, inventoried and prioritized using a standardized system. Detailed work plans and maintenance budgets will allow clear communication and structured planning. GIS will be the primary data tool used. Dedicated funding will allow all trails to be brought up to predetermined standards.

The South Coast Wilderness Trail system will be managed from a holistic perspective to optimize user experiences and minimize overall impacts to habitat.

Regular volunteer events and increased education will lead to increased community investment and a sense of pride in local parks and trails. Various user groups will work side by side on trail enhancement, strengthening a sense of shared ownership and investment in the trails. A core team of dedicated volunteers will act as leaders to less-experienced volunteers.

New trail construction and maintenance techniques customized to the unique characteristics of the South Coast Wilderness will be developed and utilized.

Program Success Monitored By 

Number of annual volunteer hours, unique volunteers, and volunteer events logged

Trail work numbers including miles brushed, grade dips, structures built, feet of tread repair, and pounds of materials transported

Feedback from end-of-season Trail Volunteer Program participant evaluation

Number of trails inventoried and project work plans developed

Number of unique donors inspired to donate to trail maintenance, and amount donated

Photo documentation of improved trail/habitat conditions: improved vegetation/habitat near trails, improved water runoff/decreased erosion

Trails formally assessed on a regular schedule to identify maintenance needs or potential issues

Examples of Program Success 
From FY 2014-15 to 2015-16, we more than doubled the number of our volunteer trail events, and more than quadrupled the number of unique volunteers participating. In FY 2016-17, our staff and volunteers completed over 1000 hours of trailwork on 15 different trails. Among other accomplishments, we improved or maintained 1600 linear feet of tread and cleared 21,500 linear feet (over four miles) of brush off our trails.
 
Complete closure and rehabilitation of old, badly-eroded alignment of Laguna Ridge Trail in Laguna Coast Wilderness Park.

The top of Laguna Ridge Trail has been rerouted and unauthorized social trails in the area have been successfully closed and rehabilitated. Further damage to the area from erosion has been minimized. The old trail alignment, the dozer scar left from fire suppression activities, and the burned area are being revegetated with native species. Trail users’ experiences have been improved, maintenance needs have been reduced, and habitat for wildlife is being improved.


Management


CEO/Executive Director Hallie Jones
CEO Term Start Oct 2013
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Hallie was born and raised in Laguna Canyon. After a brief stint in Washington DC, she relocated to Los Angeles and spent almost fifteen years working in marine conservation for Heal the Bay. In 2013, she returned to her roots when she joined Laguna Canyon Foundation as Executive Director. Hallie has a background in marketing and creative writing. She lives in Laguna Beach with her two children, who enjoy camping, hiking and being outdoors just as much as she does.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Maxwell Borella Dec 2010 Oct 2013
Karl Warkomski June 2008 Sept 2009

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 8
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 150
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 11
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 11
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

--

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Michelle Kremer
Board Chair Company Affiliation Surfrider Foundation
Board Chair Term Jan 2014 - Dec 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Stacy Blackwood OC Parks Voting
Kelly Boyd City of Laguna Beach Voting
Elisabeth Brown Ph.D. Retired Voting
Andrew Cmiel Retired Voting
Dave Csira Realtor Voting
Mark Draper Spring Creek Investors Voting
Johanna Felder Village Laguna Voting
Scott Ferguson The Conservation Fund Voting
Charles Fletcher CEO Emcor Group Voting
Ken Frank -- --
Peter Kote Professional Fiduciary Service Voting
Michelle Kremer Surfrider Corporation Voting
Barbara Norton OC Parks Voting
Calen Offield -- --
Derek Ostensen Land Acquisition Consultant Voting
Richard Ramsey Architect Voting
Carey Strombotne -- Voting
Lance Vallery Vallery Studio Illustrations Voting
Rob Zur Schmiede -- --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 19
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 7
Male: 12
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 75%
Written Board Selection Criteria --
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Investment
  • Marketing

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Revenue $1,712,600.00
Projected Expenses $1,319,600.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 LCF 990

2014 LCF 990

2013 LCF 990

2012 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $1,079,899 $790,018 $595,983
Total Expenses $937,578 $892,193 $685,747

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$552,157 $419,560 $572,054
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $0 $0 $0
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support $0 $0 $0
Earned Revenue $0 $0 $0
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,625 $4,036 $4,145
Membership Dues $0 $0 $0
Special Events $0 $0 $0
Revenue In-Kind $0 $0 $0
Other $525,117 $366,422 $19,784

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $773,391 $712,330 $446,181
Administration Expense $146,168 $168,379 $228,579
Fundraising Expense $18,019 $11,484 $10,987
Payments to Affiliates $0 $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.15 0.89 0.87
Program Expense/Total Expenses 82% 80% 65%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 3% 3% 2%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $907,828 $766,311 $868,293
Current Assets $664,074 $522,300 $623,727
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $804 $611
Current Liabilities $0 $0 $0
Total Net Assets $907,828 $765,507 $867,682

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities inf inf inf

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose
Our campaign will raise funds to build a new headquarters and wilderness center.
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates July 2017 - June 2021
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.