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Project Access, Inc.

 2100 W. Orangewood Ave., Suite 230
 Orange, CA 92868
[P] (949) 253-6200 x 305
[F] (714) 940-9803
www.project-access.org
[email protected]
Christina Garkovich
FOUNDED: 1999
INCORPORATED: 1999
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA Project Access
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Employer Identification Number 33-0834635 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Project Access is to be the leading provider of vital on-site health, education, and employment services to low-income families, children, and seniors. Founded in 1999, our goal is to give low-income families the tools needed to break the cycle of poverty by becoming healthier, further educated, and financially stable.

 

Mission Statement

The mission of Project Access is to be the leading provider of vital on-site health, education, and employment services to low-income families, children, and seniors. Founded in 1999, our goal is to give low-income families the tools needed to break the cycle of poverty by becoming healthier, further educated, and financially stable.

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2018
Projected Expenses $7,430,170.00
Projected Revenue $7,430,170.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Education for Youth
  • Economic Stability
  • Health and Wellness
  • Community Building

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

The mission of Project Access is to be the leading provider of vital on-site health, education, and employment services to low-income families, children, and seniors. Founded in 1999, our goal is to give low-income families the tools needed to break the cycle of poverty by becoming healthier, further educated, and financially stable.

 


Background Statement

Project Access was founded in 1999 by Affordable Housing Access (AHA) leaders William Hirsch and Jonathan Webb, who strived to build stronger communities by bringing health, education, and employment readiness resources to underserved families and seniors living in low-income apartment communities.

Almost all of the residents served by Project Access have a total annual income that is at or below 60% of median income in their area, which qualifies them for low-income housing. Some of the individuals we serve have annual incomes of $10,000 or less, making it difficult for them to provide even basic necessities. Most of our residents fall in the following categories: 1) adults struggling to secure meaningful employment and provide for the needs of their families, 2) youth struggling to fulfill their full potential while confronting high-risk situations within impoverished communities, and 3) seniors facing the hardships that come with age and retirement. The residents we serve live on a financial tightrope, making day to day choices that attempt to balance housing, education, nutrition, and health care needs.

Over the past 18 years, Project Access has been a leading provider of vital health, education, and employment services to families, children, and seniors living in the shadows of poverty. Our innovative Family and Senior Resource Centers have served as a platform for comprehensive community services that create a comprehensive network of care for low-income, underserved populations. The onsite location of Project Access’ Family and Senior Resource Centers places us directly in the heart of the low-income communities we serve. This allows us to weave our staff into the fabric of the community, building long-term, authentic relationships with the individuals we serve and providing them with convenient access to critical services that help break the cycle of poverty.


Impact Statement

For the past 19 years, Project Access has worked to transform the lives of underserved individuals and families in Orange County by integrating community partnerships, our Family Resource Center model, and high-quality resident services to deliver comprehensive programs that address the unique needs of the individuals we serve. Project Access has successfully navigated the landscape of poverty in Orange County and achieved the following impacts in 2016:

    • 5,237 unduplicated residents received comprehensive health and wellness, education enrichment, and employment skill-building services at an onsite Project Access Family Resource Center.
    • 493 individuals attended in a Project Access nutrition knowledge-building program or exercise class.
    • 2,235 children, youth, and teens enhanced their academic, social, and emotional skills by participating in enrichment activities during the out-of-classroom hours.
    • 1,561 youth received structured after-school tutoring.
    • Project Access distributed 34,759 healthy snacks, breakfasts, and lunches to residents at their onsite Family Resource Center.
    • 755 residents received assistance preparing for employment, enhanced their financial literacy skills, improved their parenting skills, or enrolled in an ESL class.
    • 93% of seniors reported an improved sense of community as a result of Project Access.
    • 97 seniors participated in community socialization and transportation programs.

 

Our flagship Family Resource Center opened at Warwick Square Apartments in Santa Ana, California, and has served as a thriving community hub for families, children, teens, and seniors for almost 20 years. Project Access’ unique model of service delivery allows us to directly impact the lives of hard to reach pockets of impoverished families and builds trust while also eliminating a significant service barrier—a lack of reliable transportation.


Needs Statement

 

Project Access partners with affordable housing owners to provide resident services that help lift low-income families out of poverty. Most of the owners that contract with us are required by government regulations to provide a minimum level of service to the residents who live in their communities. As a nonprofit organization, Project Access also raises philanthropic funds and involves volunteers in our mission, thereby bridging the gap between the fees paid by each owner and what is truly needed in order to have the greatest impact on low-income children and families in each community. For example, some housing developers are only required to offer services three days a week, but Project Access raises funds to ensure that our doors can be open five days a week to give impoverished families stable access to comprehensive support services.

Project Access is in need of funding for After-School Tutoring and College Readiness Program which seeks to combat the devastating effects of poverty on academic achievement, empower underprivileged students to pursue higher education, and give youth access to a lifetime of opportunities. This program provides youth who live in the low-income complexes with after-school academic tutoring which is critical to academic success.

Additionally, Project Access is actively recruiting community volunteers to serve on our fundraising and events committees as well as provide onsite, day-to-day support at our 16 Family Resource Centers in Orange County.


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Project Access is committed to lifting families out of poverty. If this mission moves you, please contact us to find the right giving vehicle. Opportunities to support our mission include: making a donation, sponsoring a special event, serving on a committee, volunteering at a Family or Senior Resource Center, "Adopting" a Family or Senior Resource Center, contributing to a supply drive, sponsoring a Family Resource Center holiday community event or our Annual Health Fair, providing your professional services, or holding your own fundraiser on behalf of Project Access.

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Central Orange County
West Orange County
North Orange County
South Orange County

Project Access operates 17 Family and Senior Resource Centers in Orange County, serving over 5,000 unduplicated low-income individuals in total. Our flagship Family Resource Center opened at Warwick Square Apartments in Santa Ana, California, and has served as a thriving community hub for children, teens, and adults for almost 20 years. Overall, Project Access currently operates more than 60 Family and Senior Resource Centers throughout California, Colorado, Georgia, Texas, and Arizona.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Services
  2. Education - Educational Services
  3. Employment - Employment Preparation & Procurement

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Programs


Education for Youth

The Public Policy Institute of California recently found that up to 25 percent of young children in Orange County live in poverty. With over one in five children experiencing poverty and at risk of slipping through the cracks in the school system, the need for education enrichment programming is tremendous. In order to combat the effects of poverty on youth academic achievement, Project Access provides a rigorous year-round program that offers structured tutoring, educational enrichment, and academic support that lift at-risk youth out of poverty and give them access to a lifetime of opportunities. The After-School Tutoring and College Readiness Program is a high-quality, year-round program that provides a unique opportunity for underserved youth to receive comprehensive out-of-classroom education enrichment and college readiness services that prime them for academic achievement and beyond. In order to help low-income youth and teens rise above the poverty that surrounds them, Project Access integrates experiential learning, strong community partnerships, nutrition knowledge-building, rigorous STEM and STEAM learning activities, college empowerment, character-building opportunities, and life skills training into the program’s curriculum. Furthermore, Project Access' onsite presence provides low-income families with a uniquely unparalleled access to high-quality after-school programming that sets youth on a path to higher education.

Budget  $764,402.00
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

 

Project Access is committed to achieving the following successful results for the program:

· 100% of youth will have access to Project Access’ “College Corner” and college preparation resources.

· 70% of participating youth will demonstrate positive academic achievement in Reading/English and/or Math, as evidenced by school report cards.

· 75% of youth served will demonstrate positive achievement in the areas of study habits, problem-solving, and communication skills, as evidenced by Citizenship grades on school report cards.

 

Program Long-Term Success 

Long-term goals for the Education for Youth Initiative include:

· Children who enter school at the same level of academic achievement as their more affluent peers.

· Youth who pursue a college education, obtain employment that pays significantly higher than minimum wage, and successfully break the heartbreaking cycle of poverty that spans generations.

By providing low-income youth with educational assistance and academic enrichment opportunities, our goal is to inspire low-income youth to dream and achieve beyond their current circumstances.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

 

A core value of Project Access is meaningful outcomes. We employ one full-time and one part-time social impact analyst to measure the effectiveness of our programming and determine areas for improvement. Our program evaluation team will collect attendance reports, distribute observational tools to staff, conduct pre- and post-tests, and assess the overall success of the Health Resources for Low-Income Families Program using a self-reported community survey at the end of the grant period. Surveys measure participant change in healthy behaviors, knowledge, and access to health resources. Pre-tests isolate program results so that they can be accurately attributed to Project Access’ impact.

Our Social Impact Analyst compiles and reports outcomes to the Director of Social Impact, who uses the information to make adjustments to improve program efficacy and develop site-specific goals. Success is determined when evaluation results meet or exceed expected outcomes. Project Access is committed towards robust program evaluation and thus has invested in human capital to support monitoring our social impact.

Examples of Program Success 



Economic Stability

We empower our residents to achieve economic self-sufficiency by partnering with financial institutions to provide financial literacy education, job search assistance, resume support, and mock interviews. We also provide onsite computer training in our computer lab, English classes, and GED tutoring in order to give low-income individuals the skills needed to maintain employment, enter a competitive job market, and achieve financial stability. Additionally, Project Access' robust Capacity-Building and Savings Program gives adults living in low-income apartment communities the skills and resources needed to make informed decisions with their finances by increasing awareness and comprehension of financial concepts. Residents of affordable housing communities learn the basics of financial education and improve their capabilities to become self-sufficient. Participants receive access to financial services, realize the importance of saving money and reducing debt, learn effective financial management skills, and form habits of saving through our unique incentivized program.

Budget  $516,932.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Employment, General/Other
Population Served Adults At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

Short term goals include:

· 85% of residents will report that they are able to pay their rent/bills without additional assistance.

· 90% of residents will increase their access and knowledge of available financial services.

· 90% of residents will report that the information they received from Project Access’ services will help them save more money/ reduce debt.

· 90% of residents will report that the information and assistance they received from Project Access’ services was helpful in securing employment.

· 90% of the residents who received assistance in interviewing skills will report that Project Access’ training helped increase their confidence in job interviews.

· 75% of the adults will report that their computer skills have increased as a result of the technology program making them more employable.

· 90% of the residents will indicate an increase in access and knowledge of educational resources that will further their employment opportunities.

Program Long-Term Success 

The long-term goals for the program include:

· Adults will have a deeper understanding of financial concepts and have the tools and resources to effectively manage their finances and make healthy financial decisions.

· Adults will be equipped with the skills and resources to successfully seek and obtain stable employment to provide for their families.

· Adults will have a resource for improving their skills to continue moving up the economic ladder and establish a pathway out of poverty.

Ultimately, the program envisions empowered families who are able to successfully achieve financial self-sufficiency.

 

Program Success Monitored By 

A core value of Project Access is meaningful outcomes. We employ one full-time and one part-time social impact analyst to measure the effectiveness of our programming and determine areas for improvement. Our program evaluation team will collect attendance reports, distribute observational tools to staff, conduct pre- and post-tests, and assess the overall success of the Health Resources for Low-Income Families Program using a self-reported community survey at the end of the grant period. Surveys measure participant change in healthy behaviors, knowledge, and access to health resources. Pre-tests isolate program results so that they can be accurately attributed to Project Access’ impact.

Our Social Impact Analyst compiles and reports outcomes to the Director of Social Impact, who uses the information to make adjustments to improve program efficacy and develop site-specific goals. Success is determined when evaluation results meet or exceed expected outcomes. Project Access is committed towards robust program evaluation and thus has invested in human capital to support monitoring our social impact.

Examples of Program Success 



Health and Wellness

The Center for Disease Control’s “Health Disparities in Education and Income” Fact Sheet states that “people who live and work in low socioeconomic circumstances are at increased risk for mortality, morbidity, unhealthy behaviors, reduced access to health care and inadequate quality of care”. In order to combat the significant health disparities experienced by low-income populations, Project Access’ Health and Wellness programming works to increase physical activity and access to nutrition education and healthy food. The program is unique in its ability to reach low-income individuals at all stages of life—from youth to aging seniors. The program increases access to health services through health fairs, onsite preventative health screenings, nutrition education, healthy snacks and supplemental food, and fitness activities. We partner with medical/dental clinics, food banks, and other healthcare providers to bring critical health services to residents that they would otherwise not receive. 

Budget  $609,328.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Preventive Health
Population Served Families Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

 

Short-term successes include:

· 80% of residents will report that Project Access increased healthy behaviors in their family.

· 80% of residents will report that their child's access to fruits and vegetables has improved as a result of Project Access' programming.

· 80% of residents will be able to identify their local community clinic after Project Access' health outreach and education efforts.

Program Long-Term Success 

Long-term program success includes families and seniors who live active, healthy lifestyles and have knowledge of nutrition and healthy habits. Long-term success also includes families and seniors who have access to healthcare services, preventative care, and are empowered healthcare consumers who can advocate for their health. The ultimate goal is to have thriving, healthy communities at all socioeconomic levels.

Program Success Monitored By 

A core value of Project Access is meaningful outcomes. We employ one full-time and one part-time social impact analyst to measure the effectiveness of our programming and determine areas for improvement. Our program evaluation team will collect attendance reports, distribute observational tools to staff, conduct pre- and post-tests, and assess the overall success of the Health Resources for Low-Income Families Program using a self-reported community survey at the end of the grant period. Surveys measure participant change in healthy behaviors, knowledge, and access to health resources. Pre-tests isolate program results so that they can be accurately attributed to Project Access’ impact.

Our Social Impact Analyst compiles and reports outcomes to the Director of Social Impact, who uses the information to make adjustments to improve program efficacy and develop site-specific goals. Success is determined when evaluation results meet or exceed expected outcomes. Project Access is committed towards robust program evaluation and thus has invested in human capital to support monitoring our social impact.

Examples of Program Success 



Community Building

In order to foster community safety and reduce social isolation, we provide family engagement activities, community building events, neighborhood safety programs, and social/recreational activities for seniors. Community building efforts include National Night Out events, community dinners, holiday celebrations, recreational activities, and social gatherings for isolated seniors. Our community building efforts help develop safe, thriving, connected communities.

Budget  $266,239.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

 

Short-term program successes include:

· At least 90% of residents will report that they feel safe in their community.

· At least 90% of residents will report that they have stronger relationships with their neighbors.

· 85% of Project Access' residents will report that Project Access has helped them improve a current life situation.

Program Long-Term Success 

The long-term success of the program is to create communities in which residents feel safe and have strong relationships with their neighbors.

Program Success Monitored By 

A core value of Project Access is meaningful outcomes. We employ one full-time and one part-time social impact analyst to measure the effectiveness of our programming and determine areas for improvement. Our program evaluation team will collect attendance reports, distribute observational tools to staff, conduct pre- and post-tests, and assess the overall success of the Health Resources for Low-Income Families Program using a self-reported community survey at the end of the grant period. Surveys measure participant change in healthy behaviors, knowledge, and access to health resources. Pre-tests isolate program results so that they can be accurately attributed to Project Access’ impact.

 

Our Social Impact Analyst compiles and reports outcomes to the Director of Social Impact, who uses the information to make adjustments to improve program efficacy and develop site-specific goals. Success is determined when evaluation results meet or exceed expected outcomes. Project Access is committed towards robust program evaluation and thus has invested in human capital to support monitoring our social impact.

Examples of Program Success 



Management


CEO/Executive Director Kristin Byrnes MS
CEO Term Start Mar 2018
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Kristin Byrnes has over 25 years of experience working in the nonprofit sector in areas that include leadership, strategic planning, program development, business development, and organizational development. Early in her career, Byrnes developed a passion for helping others in need. Her philosophy is to respect those who face the challenges of poverty and to help them help themselves. Most recently, Ms. Byrnes lead Project Access to grow to over 65 Resource Centers. Prior to joining Project Access, Ms. Byrnes held various leadership positions in nonprofit organizations including Mercy Behavioral Health.

Ms. Byrnes has been honored with a Woman Making a Difference Award from State Senator Lou Correa (D-Orange County) and was recognized by Women Helping Women/Men2Work as one of its Women Helping Women Employment Leaders. In 2013, Ms. Byrnes was the featured CEO in OC Metro magazine. In addition, Ms. Byrnes was named one of the Most Influential people in OC in 2014 by the Orange County Register.

Ms. Byrnes attended college on a softball scholarship and graduated from La Roche College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Human Services and a minor in Gerontology. She received a Master of Science degree in Professional Leadership with an emphasis on Nonprofit Management from the University of Carlow, Pittsburgh, PA

 

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Debra Fine June 2009 Aug 2010

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Claudia Beaty MS Chief Financial Officer

Claudia Beaty, Chief Financial Officer, joined Project Access in 2007 and provides financial and operational leadership to achieve the financial and strategic objectives of the organization. Claudia's responsibilities include Finance, Human Resources, Technology, Compliance, and Risk Management. Claudia brings more than 30 years of experience in operations management and in the development, growth, and management of start-up companies. Claudia received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathematics from California State University, Northridge and received a Master’s in Information and Computer Science from the University of California, Irvine.

 

Christina Garkovich CFRE Chief Development Officer

Christina Garkovich became Chief Development Officer of Project Access in 2017. She has dedicated over 14 years to the non-profit sector with a focus on fundraising and management. As a Certified Fund Raising Executive, Christina’s expertise includes Major Gift Fundraising, Corporate and Foundation Relations, and Board Development, to name a few. Her prior experience includes serving as Chief Development Officer for Boys Town California and Web Wise Kids. Christina has her Bachelor’s in Political Science from California State University, Long Beach and was a founding Board Member for the Orange County Young Executives.

Shay Sorrells MSW Vice President of Resident Services

Shay Sorrells became Vice President of Resident Services at Project Access in 2017. She brings a depth of experience in community-based programming, program scaling, and staff management and development at a local and national level.

Her tenure at Boys Town included increasing responsibility both at the state and national level, including Senior Director of Program Operations. With more than 10 years of experience in community-based programming, Shay Sorrells is adept at outcome performance management, program data analysis, developing curriculum, program scaling and staff management and development. Her collaboration with stakeholders and community partners has afforded her with strong skills and a wide base of experience including completing community needs assessment and engagement; program design, implementation and evaluation; creating, analyzing and improving on program processes and systems; increasing revenue through program efficiency; and determining and meeting shared objectives with stakeholders.

Shay earned her BS in Psychology from Vanguard University of Southern California in 2001 and her MSW from California State University, Long Beach in 2009. In addition, her involvement in higher education as an Adjunct Professor at the university level in the areas of psychology, community mental health and community projects, further broadens her knowledge and areas of expertise, which will serve our growing organization well.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
2015 - 2016 Housing & Education Excellence Partnership for Children and Youth 2016
2016 Disney Million Dollar Dazzle Award Disneyland 2016
City National Bank Community Partner of the Year City National Bank 2016
Bank of America Neighborhood Builder Excellence Award Bank of America 2007

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Collaboration is a core value of Project Access, as evidenced by the 228 formal partnerships we have with like-minded community organizations and service providers in Orange County. Our strategic partnerships allow us to wrap the low-income families we serve in a comprehensive network of support and leverage existing community resources for the benefit of those in need.

We invite community partners to Project Access Family Resource Centers in order to leverage our onsite service model and pool Project Access’ 19 years of service with the experience of partnering organizations. Our Family Resource Center’s reliable, fixed physical space allows us to offer our partners a platform to reach individuals living in the shadows of poverty who would otherwise not receive supportive services to meet their basic needs.

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 56
Number of Part Time Staff 27
Number of Volunteers 776
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 70%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: --
Asian American/Pacific Islander: --
Caucasian: --
Hispanic/Latino: --
Native American/American Indian: --
Other: 78
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: --
Male: --
Not Specified 78

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Government Licenses

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CEO Comments


Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Mr. Jonathan B. Webb
Board Chair Company Affiliation Affordable Housing Access, Inc.
Board Chair Term Jan 1999 -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Adrian Craciun -- --
Adrian Craciun PIMCO Voting
Ana Marie del Rio JD Steadfast Companies Voting
Chris Garcia Banc of California Voting
Eugene Gonzalez BBVA Compass Voting
Guy Marsala MBA Go2Guy4Results, Inc. Voting
Edward Mora MBA Bank of the West Voting
Mark Skaist JD Stradling Yocca Carlson & Rauth Voting
Danuel Stanger Bridge Investment Group Holdings Voting
Mark H. Strauss Cohen Financial Voting
Catherine Talbot Candeur Group Voting
Jonathan B. Webb Affordable Housing Acccess, Inc. Voting
Willian Bill Whalen -- --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
Juan Carlos Araque Ph.D University of Southern California NonVoting
Scott Barker Village Investments NonVoting
Rebecca Clark LINC Housing NonVoting
Thomas M. Demchuk Wells Fargo NonVoting
William Hirsch Affordable Housing Access, Inc. NonVoting
Brendon C. Kensel Kensel & Co. NonVoting
Greg S. Labate JD Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton NonVoting
Larry Leaman LML Consultants NonVoting
Herbert Y. Rosenblum Community Volunteer NonVoting
Paul J. Salerno JD Beacon Pointe Advisors NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 0
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 0
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

--

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Audit
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Endowment
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Marketing
  • Nominating

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Revenue $7,430,170.00
Projected Expenses $7,430,170.00
Form 990s

2016 Project Access 990

2015 Project Access 990

2014 Project Access 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 Project Access Audited Financials

2015 Project Access Audited Financials

2014 Project Access Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $6,149,794 $5,538,209 $5,207,691
Total Expenses $6,066,643 $5,528,926 $5,233,281

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$480,243 $357,381 $521,184
Government Contributions $24,661 $7,500 $37,664
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $24,661 $7,500 $37,664
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $3,658,490 $3,375,468 $3,028,448
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,681 $2,777 $3,618
Membership Dues -- -- $0
Special Events $311,590 $319,152 $300,232
Revenue In-Kind $1,672,129 $1,475,931 $1,316,545
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $5,060,400 $4,427,420 $4,324,034
Administration Expense $483,162 $424,566 $331,432
Fundraising Expense $523,081 $676,940 $577,815
Payments to Affiliates -- -- $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.01 1.00 1.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses 83% 80% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 64% 99% 67%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $1,514,659 $1,370,391 $1,433,587
Current Assets $1,473,311 $1,336,627 $1,390,027
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- $0
Current Liabilities $288,550 $220,343 $286,402
Total Net Assets $1,226,109 $1,150,048 $1,147,185

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.11 6.07 4.85

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%
Endowment Value $10,353.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

CEO Comments

Project Access partners with affordable housing owners to provide resident services that help lift low-income families out of poverty and keep seniors healthy and engaged. Most of the owners that contract with us are required by government regulations to provide a minimum level of service to the residents who live in their communities. As a nonprofit organization, Project Access also raises philanthropic funds (including donations from affordable housing owners themselves) and involves volunteers in our mission, thereby bridging the gap between the fees paid by each owner and what is truly needed in order to have the greatest impact on low-income children and families in each community. As an organization Project Access is fully committed to fiscal responsibility and long-term sustainability. Furthermore, we have a reasonable reserve that allows us to manage through recessions or unexpected shortfalls. Annually, we develop balanced budgets and we align our budgets to our 3-year Strategic Plan and our Annual Operating Plan. This alignment helps us to meet our goals, address challenges and opportunities, and use donor contributions efficiently to achieve our mission.

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financial statements, 990's and consultation with the organization. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.