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Kidworks Community Development Corporation

 1902 W. Chestnut Avenue
 Santa Ana, CA 92703
[P] (714) 834-9400 x 107
[F] (714) 834-9494
www.kidworksoc.org
[email protected]
David Benavides
FOUNDED: 1993
INCORPORATED: 2002
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA KidWorks
Former Names El Puente Community Development Corporation (2010)
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Employer Identification Number 74-3081569 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

Our mission is to restore at-risk neighborhoods one life at a time.

Our vision is to transform challenged neighborhoods in central Santa Ana by building on the strengths and potential in the community through education, character formation, and personal development.

Mission Statement

Our mission is to restore at-risk neighborhoods one life at a time.

Our vision is to transform challenged neighborhoods in central Santa Ana by building on the strengths and potential in the community through education, character formation, and personal development.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $3,084,573.00
Projected Revenue $3,183,286.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Preschool
  • College Success Initiative
  • University Starts Now After School Program
  • Youth Engagement
  • Family Engagement

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

Our mission is to restore at-risk neighborhoods one life at a time.

Our vision is to transform challenged neighborhoods in central Santa Ana by building on the strengths and potential in the community through education, character formation, and personal development.


Background Statement

KidWorks, founded in 1993 by Larry and Jayme Acosta, began in a tiny, one-room apartment on Townsend Street as a summer safe haven for children and youth.

Today, KidWorks operates four community centers in at-risk neighborhoods of central Santa Ana. Over 1,000 children, youth, and parents participate in our weekly programs and over 4,000 community members are served annually. KidWorks has grown into a vibrant non-profit that serves central Santa Ana students and families through a fully licensed preschool, after-school programs, tutoring, mentoring, and adult services in the areas of health, parenting classes, and support groups. In partnership with our valued supporters and volunteers, we are guiding children and youth towards positive life choices and redirecting their path towards college.


Impact Statement

KidWorks’ primary focus is on young people from 4 – 26 years old living in some of the most vulnerable communities in central Santa Ana. Children and youth participate in a preschool and after-school program where they have a safe and positive space to participate in educational activities including tutoring, computer training, character building, reading literacy, financial literacy, art projects, health workshops, fitness activities, mentoring, college preparation, civic engagement, and leadership development.

KidWorks believes in partnering with the whole family. Parents have access to classes, conferences and workshops on topics including child development, education, financial literacy, health, and leadership. Family involvement is encouraged; in 2017 we had 83% of our families volunteering at some capacity at KidWorks.

We are the proud of the strides we have made during our 25-year history in central Santa Ana. We currently serve 1,000 students and their families through our programs. Our top 2017 accomplishments include:

* 100% Kinder-readiness amongst our preschool graduates

* 100% of KidWorks High School students graduate in four years

* 100% of KidWorks High School seniors go onto attend college

* 83% of our parent's volunteer during KidWorks programs and events

Over the next year our goal is to begin implementation of our College Success Initiative which focuses on KidWorks students graduating from college. At KidWorks, 100% of our high school seniors graduate on time and 100% go on to college or university. And until now, we thought of them as our alumni. With the launch of our new KidWorks College Success Initiative™ we now serve students from Pre-K to B.A., making an 18 year commitment to each student at KidWorks.


Needs Statement

KidWorks consistently relies on the generosity, skills and expertise of both donors (in-kind and monetary) and volunteers to support our innovative programs and operations.

Donations: Kidworks could not exist without the generosity of individuals, corporations, and foundations. We have several ways to directly support KidWorks programs and students. Visit www.kidworksoc.org to donate. We also need on-going donations of classroom items, such as graphing calculators and tablets for students in the classroom.

Volunteers: Volunteers are needed to help tutor, mentor, and instruct workshops (arts, sciences, computers, fitness) for children and youth in our preschool and after-school programs. Bilingual volunteers (Spanish, Khmer, and Vietnamese) and those with special skills including fundraising, graphic design and technological experience greatly benefit the organization. We also welcome community and business leaders to serve in a leadership capacity through one of our organizational committees, such as our Fund Development Committee, Finance Committee or our Board of Directors.


CEO Statement

The future shines bright for KidWorks. We recently completed construction on the KidWorks Dan Donahue Center, eliminated our student waiting list, and our Foundation for Success Luncheon was a record-breaking year for both revenue and visibility.

Over the next year, we are expanding our commitment to KidWorks students through our College Success Program, engaging new volunteers and corporate partners, and are busy planning our 2020 Golf Classic and Foundation for Success luncheon events.

We are truly blessed to serve alongside so many amazing individuals and partners in our community. It is directly because you care and invest your time, talent, and treasure that we are able to have preschool teachers instruct young children so that they are ready for Kindergarten…provide tutoring for students struggling in school…take teenagers to visit their first college campus…develop youth leaders who advocate for safe and healthy community changes…and help parents support their family’s well-being.

Thank you for your interest in supporting the children and families living in at-risk neighborhoods of central Santa Ana.


Board Chair Statement

It is my honor to serve as the Board Chair of KidWorks. With over 40 years’ experience in the field of education, I witness first-hand the transformation that KidWorks has the lives on students, their family and the community.  Education leads to higher income, improved health, lower crime rates and a better future for the next generation.  
At KidWorks, students aren’t statistics; they receive personalized attention with their homework, enrichment activities to spark a love of learning, coupled with leadership training and spiritual development all so they will thrive as adults. I invite you to join me in partnering with me in supporting KidWorks. 

 


Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Every contribution and act of kindness counts - whether it’s some of your time, a donation, or a gift. You can place a student from one of Orange County’s most vulnerable communities on a path toward college. To learn more about KidWorks visit us at kidworksoc.org.

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Central Orange County

KidWorks serves over 1,000 children, youth and families each week in central Santa Ana, California. The average family served by KidWorks earns a household income of $25,000 for a household of 5 members. Only 55% of residents in Santa Ana have graduated from high school. Many of the students in our programs are the first to graduate from high school in their family and the first to enroll in college.

KidWorks is truly a safe haven for children and families. In collaboration with our community partners and the Santa Ana Police Department, the areas in which we serve have been designated crime ‘hot spots’ due to high rates of poverty, school dropouts, and significant gang involvement with 100 gangs and 4,500 gang members.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Educational Services
  2. Community Improvement, Capacity Building -
  3. Youth Development - Youth Development Programs

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Programs


Preschool

Our preschool helps 48 children improve their school-readiness skills through activities promoting socialization, developing fine motor skills, improving literacy and English language development, increasing personal hygiene, gardening, art projects, and learning to use technology.

Budget  $459,448
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

Results from the 2016-2017 school year:

100% of preschool students (48 of 48) were assessed as “Kindergarten-ready.”

100% of the families in our preschool participated in the yearlong literacy program.

100% of preschool families volunteered in the classroom.

Program Long-Term Success 

The benefits of attending preschool, especially for children living in low-income, predominately Spanish-speaking families, have been well-documented. Higher rates of high school graduation and lower rates of juvenile arrest are two long-term outcomes that have been associated with receiving a preschool education.

Program Success Monitored By  The KidWorks Preschool staff ensure early education success by regular screening for Kindergarten readiness in reading and math, measuring early childhood development using DRDP (Desired Results Developmental Profile) and the use of family reading logs to track books read at home through our literacy program.  


Examples of Program Success 

Wandering around the classroom, throwing things, and terrorizing the other students, Giovanni was a “problem child.” He could not focus and would not sit still during group time.

That is, until we launched the Reading Program to promote family literacy. This program encourages parents to read books at home with their children. We held some skepticism that Giovanni would be a willing participant in such a focused activity.

Giovanni is the fifth child of six and his large family shares a house with another family. In the midst of these stressed home conditions, his parents started reading with him. Remarkably, this special time with his mom and dad created a bond and helped him feel secure. The practice of sitting at home in one place, helped develop his ability to focus. Everyone noticed a huge difference in Giovanni and his behavior.

His parents became very committed to the KidWorks programs. His mom got involved with a weekly mom’s group while his dad completed a “24/7 Dad” course promoting responsible fatherhood.

Giovanni and his parents continued to read, at an incredible pace. By the end of the school year, they had read 421 books, setting a new record in our preschool’s history!

Towards the end of the school year, both of his parents were out of work and they could not afford the outside fees for a graduation cap and gown. Our Preschool Director offered to pay this cost for them in exchange for some extra volunteer work. They spent several hours helping clean the preschool and were able to feel that they earned the cap and gown for their son to wear in the ceremony.

Giovanni was assessed as “Kindergarten-ready” and is now enrolled as a Kindergarten student in our after-school program. We look forward to the opportunity to continue supporting him and his family.


College Success Initiative

Our KidWorks College Success Initiative™ is aimed at ending the poverty cycle by providing our students the tools they need to graduate from college and launch careers that break the cycle.  

The students we serve at KidWorks live near or below the poverty line and face significant barriers to education.  Often their families are caught in a poverty cycle and are just surviving.  The best way to break the cycle is preventing it in the next generation. Currently 89% of low-income students leave college without a degree and 25% leave after their first year (known as Summer Melt).   
Education leads to higher income, improved health, lower crime rates and a better future. By ensuring our students graduate from college, we are ensuring a brighter future for our students and Orange County. 
Budget  1,300,000
Category  Education, General/Other Partnerships in Education
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success  fdsfd
Program Long-Term Success  efdsfds
Program Success Monitored By  Our College Success Initiative is monitored by our senior program director in conjunction with our college and career coordinator.  The senior program director provides 
Examples of Program Success  --

University Starts Now After School Program

The “University Starts Now” After-School Program provides educational, enrichment, and youth development services for 450 K-12th grade students. Students develop their academic skills through homework help, tutoring, and STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) lessons. Students improve their knowledge and awareness of post-secondary education, through college campus tours, college application assistance, college fairs, SAT preparation classes, career exploration workshops, and financial aid application assistance. Lastly, students grow socially and emotionally through character-building lessons, mentoring relationships, work experiences, community service projects, and leadership development opportunities.

Budget  $1,390,710
Category  Education, General/Other Afterschool Enrichment
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 

Results from the 2016-2017 school year:

· 100% of KidWorks’ pre-school students (48 of 48) were assessed as Kindergarten-ready.

· 100% of 12th grade students (15 of 15) graduated from high school on-time, in four years.

· 100% of 12th grade students (15 of 15) were accepted to 2 and 4-year colleges, and plan on attending college in the fall (one student deferred his acceptance to join the Army). Some of the 4-year colleges students are attending include: California Baptist University, California State University Fullerton and Dominguez Hills, University of California Berkeley and Irvine, and USC.

· 100% of 8th grade students (28 of 28) were promoted to high school.

Program Long-Term Success 

Many at-risk youth living in central Santa Ana suffer from a lack of positive role models, particularly those close to their own age. By the time students reach middle school, many of their friends and peers are becoming actively involved in gang life or other negative social pressures, including substance abuse.

With enrichment activities and leadership development training, KidWorks builds a strong peer network for young people, enabling them to feel greater support and become one another's positive role models. By ensuring that they have scholastically motivated friends of their own age who participate alongside them in the program, we dramatically increase the chances that young people will stay in school and on-track for college.

Program Success Monitored By 

KidWorks uses a case management system to track student progress for on-time high school graduation. Student participation is tracked through attendance. Preschool children are screened for Kindergarten readiness in reading and math. In addition, KidWorks uses the 'Let's Go Learn Adaptive, Diagnostic Assessment" to assess math and reading proficiency for K-5 students at the beginning and end of the year. Initial assessment results are used to design individualized lesson and tutoring plans to support student improvement and success. Pre- and post-tests and surveys are conducted to assess knowledge, skills, and behaviors for middle school and high school programs, workshops, etc. We also monitor the transition from high school to college, including college application submission, financial aid application completion, and college enrollment during the semester following high school graduation. Our College and Career Coordinator checks in with KidWorks alumni once they have entered college. Annual outcome reports are available to be shared with participants, parents, volunteers, donors and the community.

Examples of Program Success 

“I always felt that in order to succeed, I did not just have to overcome the odds, but shatter them. I had felt powerless in my economic circumstances. At KidWorks, I learned that power is the ability to make choices that affect my future. I might not have as many resources as others do but what really matters is what you do with what you have.” - Xitlally Sanchez, age 18.

This quotation comes from a young woman named Xitlally who started coming to KidWorks when she was five years old. Today, she has graduated from high school and is in her third year at Scripps College on a four-year, full-ride “Questbridge” scholarship.

Xitlaly was like many of the young people at KidWorks, vulnerable and uncertain of how she could ever break out of the cycle of poverty in her at-risk neighborhood of central Santa Ana, California.


Youth Engagement

The Youth Engagement program reaches over 200 youth to participate in civic leadership projects and events. Youth-led teams carry out community service projects and creative research methods to explore the needs in their community and influence policy makers to make positive and health-promoting changes.
Budget  $324,814
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) At-Risk Populations Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program Short-Term Success 
Highlights from the 2016-2017 program year:

20 youth biked 800 miles collecting 14,000 lbs. of food waste from 30 participating families, organizations, and businesses to produce compost for KidWorks’ community garden.

8 youth led in a school nutrition campaign called “Whoa Slow Go!” that encourages healthy options for school cafeterias and educates students regarding their food and beverage choices.

6 youth led the Bike It! campaign using surveys, PhotoVoice assessments, and GIS mapping to advocate for safer and improved infrastructure for pedestrians and bicyclists in Santa Ana.

Program Long-Term Success 

The Youth Engagement Department builds and develops leaders who give back and serve their community.  KidWorks' youth participate in student government, volunteer as tutors and mentors, engage in civic processes of the city, and perform service projects. 


Program Success Monitored By 
Our Youth Action Teams' success is tracked and monitored by both our staff and our youth leadership.  Members track completion of projects, workshop and leadership training attendance and most importantly, policy and systems changes at the local, regional, and state level as a result of the advocacy efforts of the youth.  
 
Examples of Program Success 

In 2015 Maribel Mateo was named one of Orange County's top 100 influential people by the Orange County Register. Maribel came to KidWorks in 2011 as a shy and unassuming teenager. She is the daughter of hard working Spanish speaking parents and the sister to three siblings in Santa Ana, California.

Soon after joining KidWorks, Maribel found her voice, learning about and speaking out on a variety of bike safety issues in Santa Ana. “I’m the quiet one,” she said, “and I really don’t like talking in class, but here at KidWorks I feel confident talking to anyone... I have learned how to step up!”

Over the last four years, Maribel has indeed stepped up and become a valuable leader in her community where she continues to advocate for safer streets and bike laws. She led the team to work with the City of Santa Ana and secured over $2.3M in state funding for a protected bike lane down Edinger Avenue.

Maribel’s parents work long hours to provide a better life for their children. They dream for Maribel and her siblings to attend college, an opportunity they never had. But it hasn’t been easy. “My family is wonderful, but we are a poor family. It’s really hard sometimes.”

Through education, enrichment, and leadership development at KidWorks, their dream has become a reality!

After graduating from high school this year, Maribel enrolled in California State University Fullerton and is the first child in her family to go to college! She is studying Civil Engineering to become an Urban Planner to expand on the work she’s been doing in Santa Ana.


Family Engagement

A parent is the first educator of his or her child and we do our best to give parents the resources, support, and training to support their families. KidWorks supports over 320 parents through workshops, training, peer mentoring, and social enterprise activities.

 

Budget  $213,767
Category  Human Services, General/Other Parenting Education
Population Served Families Adults At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
Results from the 2016-2017 program year:
 
86% (246 of 285) parents participated in regular meetings to develop parent support systems
 
87% (248 of 285) parents provides 1,946 hours of volunteer service to KidWorks

Over 4,000 community residents participated in our outreach events including a Townsend Street Health Fair, Bishop Manor Community Fair, Operation Gobble (Turkey Distribution) and our annual Holiday events and activities. 

Program Long-Term Success 

Research shows that when parents are involved in their child’s education, everyone benefits. No matter a child's socio-economic status, ethnicity, or parents’ education level, the benefits of parent engagement include: higher grades and test scores; better attendance and homework completion; higher graduation rates and postsecondary enrollment; decrease in negative behaviors; increase in positive attitudes and behaviors.

Program Success Monitored By 
Success of our Family programming is tracked by our Family Engagement Coordinator, ensuring that we track attendance at meetings, workshops, and events, cultivate parent volunteerism, and support community leadership.  
Examples of Program Success 

From the perspective of one of our high school graduates: "Over the past three years, my parents have gotten more involved with KidWorks. My mom started exercise classes and ran her first half-marathon in 2011! My dad took a course called “24/7 Dad” and both are helping with a composting and garden project. My littlest sister attended KidWorks’ preschool and now joins my brother in the after-school program.

Our family is experiencing unity that we didn’t have before. As our family has gone through many trials, we have been overwhelmed by the love and support we received from KidWorks. In the midst of pain, seeds were planted and our family is growing. I have great hope for the future of my family and Santa Ana."


Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. David Benavides
CEO Term Start Mar 2015
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

With more than 18 years of business and community leadership, David Benavides began his tenure as KidWorks Executive Director in 2015. He was introduced to KidWorks as a college intern, and later served as Program Director and Board Member. David is committed to creating and developing programs aimed at serving Santa Ana's youth and families, and places a strong emphasis on supporting community revitalization efforts.

David also serves as a Santa Ana Councilmember, is active on key committees, and has received several community awards for his leadership and service. David is a member of the Rancho Santiago Community College District's Community Advisory Committee, and serves on the Boards of the Biola University Alumni Association and the Comunidad Latina Federal Credit Union. David is also an active member of the Santa Ana business community, and is both a Realtor and licensed Real Estate Broker. David holds a B.A. from Biola University.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mrs. Ava Steaffens Jan 1999 Mar 2015
Jayme Acosta -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Jasna Baron Chief Financial Officer --
David Benavides President & CEO --
Lisa Gels Associate Director of Development --
Lori Ohls Program Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Neighborhood Heroes Award for Rebeca Pacheco and Elizabeth Cervantes (2 members of KidWorks’ Parent Council) The City of Santa Ana’s Communication Linkage Forum 2013
Transportation Advocacy Award Alliance for a Healthy Orange County 2013
Women Making a Difference Award: Ava Steaffens Senator Lou Correa 2013
#1 Fundraising Luncheon in Orange County Orange County Business Journal 2012
Certificate of Recognition: KidWorks' Parent Council County of Orange 2012
Celebrate Literacy Award International Reading Association 2011
Community Building Award City of Santa Ana 2011
Community Pillar Award Assemblyman Solorio 2011
Leader of Integrity Award: Ava Steaffens Passkeys Foundation 2011
Orange County Hispanic Women of the Year League of United Latin American Citizens Santa Ana Council #147 2011
Certificate of Recognition County of Orange 2010
Women Making a Difference Award: Ava Steaffens Senator Lou Correa 2010
Certificate of Recognition for Star Quality Rating Improvement System Center OC Child Care & Development Planning Council 2009
Educator of the Year: Ava Steaffens Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 2008
Latino OC 100 Stay Connected OC 2008
Service Award Santa Ana Board of Recreation and Parks 2008
Neighborhood Builder Award Bank of America’s Neighborhood Excellence Initiative 2007
Peter Harman Outstanding Achievement Award Children & Families Commission of Orange County 2006
Special Congressional Recognition Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez 2006

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Academics and Arts: Santa Ana Unified School District, Santa Ana College, Santa Ana ArtWalk, The Cambodian Family, Orange County Department of Education, Avanti Music, South Coast Repertory, El Centro Cultural de Mexico, Love-in-Music, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, the Mix Academy. 

Health and Fitness:Santa Ana Building Healthy Communities, Orange County Food Access Coalition, Children's Hospital of Orange County, Angels Baseball, NIKE, Latino Health Access, Second Harvest Food Bank, CARE Ambulance, City of Santa Ana's Parks and Recreation Department, Children's Health Initiative of Orange County, Human Options, Community Action Partnership, El Fenix, The Bicycle Tree, Alliance for a Healthy Orange County, Jeff Fryer Basketball Academy, Orange County Health Care Agency, Healthy Smiles, Pretend City Museum, Santa Ana Unified School District, UCI, and Vanguard University.  


College and Career Readiness: Biola University, Concordia University, Elite Educational Institute, University of California- Irvine, Career College of California, Regional Admissions Counselors of California, Mater Dei High School, American Career College and West Coast University, and Reality Changers 

Leadership and Character Development: Santa Ana Police Department, Orange County Probation Department, Townsend Raitt Task Force, Bishop Manor Task Force, Orange County Communities Organized for Responsible Development, Calvary Church Santa Ana, Mariner's Church, Newsong Church, St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Getting Things Done, Productivity DJ, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, U.S. Bank, Orange County Credit Union, KPMG, BBVA Compass, DPR Construction, Union Bank, Taco Bell, Templo Calvario, OneOC.   

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 30
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 914
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 33
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 32
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency No Annually

Government Licenses

Child Care Services

CEO Comments

One of the greatest challenges facing KidWorks is also our greatest opportunities over the next five years.  Up until now we have considered KidWorks "graduates" when they graduate from high school and transition to college.  Thanks to a $1.0 million-dollar matching grant from David A. Pyle KidWorks is expanding our investment to our students to include graduation from college.  
 
Currently 89%  of low-income students leave college without a degree and 25% leave after their first year.   Our KidWorks College Success Initiative™ is aimed at ending the poverty cycle by providing our students the tools they need to graduate from college and begin careers that break the cycle.  
 
In order to meet this challenge, we will need to partner with students and families in new and creative ways to ensure they graduate from college on time.  This will also provide us new opportunities to partner with KidWorks alumni, educators, and donors as we solve the challenge of summer melt (college students dropping out of college after the first year). 

Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Erlinda Martinez Ed.D
Board Chair Company Affiliation Santa Ana College President Emeritus
Board Chair Term July 2017 - June 2019
Board Co-Chair Erlinda Martinez
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Santa Ana College
Board Co-Chair Term July 2014 - June 201

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
David Benavides Councilmember, City of Santa Ana --
Rachid Chamtieh Deloitte, Partner --
Jeff Garrell Silversage Advisors --
Bob Hagle Rutan & Tucker --
Ethan Kay Pacific Rim Capital Voting
Susie Lopez-Guerra Santa Ana Unified School District Voting
Jimmy Mai Wells Fargo --
Erlinda Martinez, Ed.D Santa Ana College --
Adrian Montero U.S. Bank --
David Oh PIMCO Voting
Bruce Pasqua Nevell Group --
Gabe Potyondy Commercial Real Estate Grou --
Kyle Team Community Volunteer --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr Steven Craig Craig Realty Voting
Mr. Pat Donahue Donahue Schriber Realty Group Voting
Mr. Stan Frome Frome Family Foundation Voting
Ms. Sharon Kline CBRE Voting
Mr. Scott McPherson US Bank Voting
Mr. Ruben Mendoza Foundation Building Materials Voting
Mr. David Pyle American Career College/West Coast University Voting
Mr. Rick Rawlins R & B Wire Voting
Mr. Tom Schriber Donahue Schriber Voting
Ms. Leslie Seidner Community Volunteer Voting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 4
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 11
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 96%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 30%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

  

Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Investment
  • Technology

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$4,267,425 $2,202,684 $2,039,047
Government Contributions $265,702 $306,993 $221,706
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $265,702 $306,993 $221,706
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support $0 $0 $0
Earned Revenue $18,500 $19,393 $20,812
Investment Income, Net of Losses $15,676 $10,505 $9,428
Membership Dues $0 $0 $0
Special Events $659,759 $599,241 $698,527
Revenue In-Kind $361,592 $522,212 $526,593
Other $-71,872 $0 $0

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $2,154,637 $2,527,657 $2,848,798
Administration Expense $204,505 $256,747 $287,378
Fundraising Expense $341,575 $453,439 $413,646
Payments to Affiliates $0 $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.94 0.97 0.84
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 78% 80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 7% 15% 14%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $5,541,497 $2,999,812 $3,147,159
Current Assets $2,244,531 $1,020,593 $1,093,962
Long-Term Liabilities $0 $0 $50,300
Current Liabilities $151,907 $140,036 $133,636
Total Net Assets $5,389,590 $2,859,776 $2,963,223

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 14.78 7.29 8.19

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 2%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose In 2017, KidWorks completed our $3.5 million dollars Building Dreams Capital Campaign.  This allowed us to expand our center, eliminate our waiting list of over 300 students.   
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

CEO Comments


Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financials and Form 990s as well as consultation with the organization.