Share |

Girl Scouts of Orange County

 9500 Toledo Way, Ste. 100
 Irvine, CA 92618
[P] (949) 461-8800
[F] (949) 461-8886
www.girlscoutsoc.org
[email protected]
Vikki Shepp
FOUNDED: --
INCORPORATED: 1968
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA --
Former Names Girl Scout Council of Orange County (2010)
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 95-2023244 00000

Summary


--

Mission StatementMORE »

Girl Scouts builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.

 

Mission Statement

Girl Scouts builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $10,510,211.00
Projected Revenue $10,962,157.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Outdoors/Camp
  • Comadres en Accion
  • Volunteer Capacity
  • STEM

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

Girl Scouts builds girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.

 


Background Statement

Girl Scouts offers the best leadership development program for girls in the world-designed with, by, and for girls. 

Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) began in 1912, when Juliette Gordon Low brought together 18 girls in Savannah, GA to explore new possibilities and the world around them. Today, Girl Scouts is a global movement of 2.6 million Girl Scouts across 92 countries keenly focused on preparing girls for a lifetime of leadership.

Girl Scouts of Orange County (GSOC) began in 1968 and now serves nearly 20,000 girls (ages 5-18) and 13,000 volunteers and adult members from every zip code in Orange County. GSOC’s membership spans all age levels (5-18), races, ethnicities, socio-economic levels, and physical abilities. Girl Scout troop levels consist of: Girl Scout Daisies (Grades K-1), Girl Scout Brownies (Grades 2-3), Girl Scout Juniors (Grades 4-5), Girl Scout Cadettes (Grades 6-8), Girl Scout Seniors (Grades 9-10), and Girl Scouts Ambassadors (Grades 11-12). Girls meet regularly during the school year and participate in camps and many other activities over the summer.
 
The Girl Scout Leadership Experience is built around four areas that serve as the foundation of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience: Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), Outdoors, Life Skills, and Entrepreneurship.
 
Girl Scouts helps girls thrive in five important ways. Girl Scouts:
 
• Develop a strong sense of self
• Display positive values
• Seek challenges and learn from setbacks
• Form and maintain healthy relationships
• Learns to identify and solve problems in the community.
 
Further, the inclusive, all-female environment of a Girl Scout troop creates a safe space where girls can try new activities, develop skills, take on leadership roles, and be themselves.
 
The Girl Scout Gold Award is the most prestigious award in the world for girls-- and the most difficult to earn and it is only available through Girl Scouts. Through the Girl Scout Gold Award, girls engage in a rigorous process that calls for leadership at the highest level, as girls tackle issues they are passionate about. Gold Award Girl Scouts earn college scholarships, demonstrate high educational and career outcomes, and are active in their communities. Here in Orange County, over 100 Girls earned the prestigious Girl Scout Gold Award in 2018.
 
Girl Scouts of Orange County relies on foundation grants, fundraising events, individual gifts, and corporate sponsorships to fulfill its mission. Headquartered in Irvine, CA, GSOC operates four program centers throughout the county, including its new Argyros Girl Scout Leadership Center in Newport Beach and a 700-acre resident camp, Camp Scherman, in the San Jacinto Mountains.

Impact Statement

Only Girl Scouts brings the time-tested methods and research-backed programs that speak to the strengths of girl leadership development. The Girl Scout Impact Study developed by the Girl Scout Research Institute provides compelling evidence that Girl Scouts fare better than non–Girl Scouts on several key measures of life success.
LEADERSHIP OUTCOMES. Girl Scouts are more likely than non-Girl Scouts to:
• Have a strong sense of self (80% vs. 68%)
• Have positive values (75% vs. 59%)
• Seek challenges and learn from setbacks (62% vs. 42%)
• Develop and maintain healthy relationships (60% vs. 43%)
• Exhibit community problem-solving skills (57% vs. 28%)
ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT. Girl Scouts are more likely than non-Girl Scouts to:
• Earn “excellent” grades (53% vs. 45%)
• Expect to graduate high school (88% vs. 83%)
• Expect to graduate college (70% vs. 60%)
CAREER ASPIRATIONS. Girl Scouts are more likely than non-Girl Scouts to:
• Desire a career in STEM (26% vs 14%).
HOPE FOR THE FUTURE. Girl Scouts are more likely than non-Girl Scouts to:
• Expect to have a great future (73% vs. 64%).
Many of today’s youth, OC girls among them, face considerable challenges on their way to becoming effective leaders and active citizens in a 21st-century world. The Girl Scouts Leadership Experience equips Orange County’s girls with the courage, confidence, and character to discover they have the power within themselves to make the world a better place-- and then make it happen.
Girl Scouts are twice as likely as non-Girl Scouts to participate in challenging, problem solving activities that shape their character-- 50% of female business leaders were Girl Scouts, as were 80% of female tech leaders, 76% of female U.S. Senators, 100% of female U.S. Secretaries of State, and nearly all female astronauts.
Girl Scouts helps OC girls grow into citizens who are responsible, caring, and engaged in the world around them.

Needs Statement

Girl Scouts of Orange County’s goal is to have as many girls in Orange County be a G.I.R.L. (go-getter, innovator, risk-taker, leader), but there are as many as 200,000 more girls who could become Girl Scouts. When you invest in Girl Scouts, you directly help girls develop the vital leadership skills they need to live their best lives. Every dollar you contribute sustains our unmatched leadership development programs; educational opportunities and financial aid for low-income, high risk girls; volunteer support and training; and enriching outdoor experiences.


CEO Statement

--

Board Chair Statement

--

Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

mailing a check, year round volunteer opportunities

Geographic Area Served

Central Orange County
South Orange County
West Orange County
North Orange County

Girl Scouts of Orange County serves the entire population of Orange County, CA.

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Girls Scouts of the U.S.A
  2. Education -
  3. -

--

Programs


Outdoors/Camp

70% of Girl Scouts say they got the chance to build skills or try new outdoor activities because of Girl Scouts. From hiking, swimming, camping, and kayaking to archery and horseback riding, Outdoor experiences are a fundamental part of the Girl Scout program. In fact, there are 44 different Outdoor badges Girl Scouts can earn! Through Girl Scouts Outdoor Programs, girls in Kindergarten – 12th grade seek challenges, become resourceful problem-solvers, work cooperatively, and develop a strong sense of self.

GSOC offers a variety of outdoor experiences available for Girl Scouts of all ages, including Weekend and Summer Resident Camp at Camp Scherman – a 700 acre camp in the San Jacinto Mountains, Family Camp, Volunteer-Led Day Camps held across Orange County throughout the summer, and annual outdoor programs like Cadette-O-Rama and GAM: Nautical and Water Fun!
Budget  $650,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Population Served Females
Program Short-Term Success  Outdoor progression is an important part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. It provides the opportunity for girls to build skills over time through new and increasingly challenging experiences. Weekend camps and volunteer-led day camps are often the start of the progression – introducing girls to new outdoor experiences for a limited period away from home. These early experiences will eventually lead to longer adventures in the outdoors where girls have the opportunity to advance in activities they love, continue to learn new skills, and take on leadership roles.
Program Long-Term Success  Girls opt for longer outdoor experiences, such as week(s) away at summer resident camp. During these longer periods of time, girls gain confidence in their independence, work together with other girls towards a common goal, and take on increasingly more complex challenges. Girl Scout Camp provides girls with the ideal setting to challenge themselves, fail, learn and try again until they succeed.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is captured by surveys that are filled out by the campers before they depart camp on the last day. Parent/Guardian Surveys are sent to the family for the parent/guardian to fill out when the camper returns home. Families are also emailed a survey a reminder. The results from both camper and parent/guardian surveys are reviewed to get direction from participants on what they perceived as successful (and not successful), from camper check in, to onsite programming and communications received from camp.
Examples of Program Success  Girl Scouts of Orange County has over 50 years of Orange County Girl Scout alum who credit their experiences with our outdoor offerings to building the foundation for their future success. GSOC campers have grown and excelled in many directions. One attended MIT and now is a programmer with Google. Another is on Broadway. All used the skills they learned at camp to push past their comfort zone to find success. GSOC’s Outdoor Program gives all Girl Scouts the opportunity to connect with others in a judgement-free space where they are able to grow and thrive. “Camp is more than just a place to go for the summer. Camp is family.”

Comadres en Accion

Comadres is Girl Scouts of Orange County’s outreach initiative to provide relevant and culturally sensitive leadership development programs within the Hispanic community. The goal is to transcend language and cultural barriers for girls in low-income and underserved communities and create the best leadership development experiences for all girls. Bilingual GSOC staff members provide girls in grades K - 12 with program support at troop meetings until volunteers can be identified and trained. GSOC subsidizes Comadres’ membership registrations and program materials and provides background screenings and training for adult volunteers working with the girls.

Budget  $240,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  GSOC brings Girl Scouts to new girls and families through collaboration with school officials. Success happens when principals and teachers value and promote Girl Scouts to their students and families – letting them know about opportunities available at their school. Schools appreciate the immediate changes that occur in girls who are participating in Girl Scouts. The Girls attending quickly learn to listen, pay attention and complete projects on time without having to be reminded. Other noticeable changes are that Girls start to share ideas and successes with one another and learn to cooperate to get tasks done.
Program Long-Term Success  Girls in Comadres learn what they are passionate about, take the lead to achieve their goals, and give back to their community through service projects and Girl Scouts Highest Awards. Girls who stay within the Girl Scout program apply to colleges and succeed at getting into the schools of their choice.
Program Success Monitored By  GSOC has second-generation Girl Scouts who participated in Comadres and return from College to help their parents deliver Girl Scout Program to a new generation of girls. After experiencing the benefits of Girl Scouts for themselves, these young women decided that Girl Scouts made a positive impact on their lives and want to show other Girls what Girl Scouts can do for them. These Alum are giving back to the community they came from.
Examples of Program Success 
In 2018, GSOC’s Comadres program will have approximately 20 Girl Scouts who will graduate High School. These Girl Scouts will be going on to Community College or Local Universities.
Girl Scouts of Orange County currently has two troops led by alum of the Comadres program. Additionally, a Teen mom, who spent two years in the Girl Scout Program is now going to a community college and is volunteering with the same teen mom’s group she graduated from to show other young moms that Girl Scouts can be a strong and positive influence in their lives. Girl Scouts shows girls that they are the leaders of their own lives and gives them the resources to thrive.

Volunteer Capacity

At Girl Scouts of Orange County, dedicated and skilled volunteers are essential to delivering Girl Scouts’ enriching programs and experiences that prepare girls for a lifetime of leadership. These talented women and men make it possible for nearly 20,000 OC Girl Scouts within 1,900 troops to thrive in a girl-led environment and realize their full potential.

To ensure high quality program delivery and the safety of all Girl Scouts, volunteers are required to complete comprehensive background screenings, trainings and certifications. From First Aid to Troop Tent Camping, Girl Scouts of Orange County volunteers engage in continuous learning throughout the year, including an invitation to the organization’s annual Volunteer Conference, a day-long training and networking event to prepare and support volunteers through their Girl Scout journey.

Girl Scouts of Orange County also recognizes the time and talents of its volunteers through national awards, Council recognition, and opportunities to take on leadership roles within the organization. The organization also hosts an annual Volunteer Recognition luncheon and ceremony to celebrate the dedication and contributions of its volunteers.
Budget  $855,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Females
Program Short-Term Success  Girls of all ages and backgrounds have positive adult mentors that provide a safe space for them to build courage, confidence and character.
Program Long-Term Success  Girl Scouts of Orange County supports approximately 33,000 members. Adult volunteers lead 1,900 troops who are overseen by 37 service units. Volunteers provide the infrastructure for each service unit and deliver the majority of the Girl Scout program.
Program Success Monitored By  Training and workshops are evaluated through surveys and data analysis. Trainings are regularly added and updated to account for safety standards, policy revisions and volunteer feedback.
Examples of Program Success  --

STEM

77% of girls say that because of Girl Scouts they are considering a career in technology. Girl Scouts gives girls opportunities to take the lead in the world of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) through “learning by doing” in a girl-focused, girl-led environment. Girl Scouts learn how they can use STEM to help their community, improve their world, and build a brighter future for themselves and everyone they know. In 2018, 4,370 OC Girl Scouts in Kindergarten through 12th grade earned badges in STEM and 1,412 girls participated in council-run STEM events, including the annual Girl Scouts of Orange County STEM Expo at Cal State Fullerton, Made with Code parities with Google Fiber, and competitions on GSOC FIRST Lego League Robotics teams.
Additionally, 5,500 girls and their leaders visited the brand new, state-of-the-art Girl Scout Leadership Center (GSLC) during its first year of operation. The GSLC is Orange County’s designated hub of Girl Scout STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) programs, the GSLC is where girls experience INSPIRE™ - Girl Scouts of Orange County's signature multimedia educational program. Through INSPIRE, girls virtually hear from groundbreaking women in diverse careers. They also learn how to create sustainable change that benefits our communities and the world, as they hear from Gold Award Girl Scouts across the nation.
GSOC is also in the fourth year of running the Girl Scouts of Orange County STEM Consortium, a collaboration of leading OC STEM Companies dedicated to creating unique STEM opportunities for girls - the next generation of STEM leaders. Through the Girl Scouts of Orange County STEM Consortium thousands of Orange County Girl Scouts have earned their STEMsational Me! badge for Girl Scout Juniors (grades 3-5) and My STEM Life badge for Girl Scout Cadettes (grades 6-8). Last year the Girl Scouts of Orange County STEM Consortium launched STEM Tank, a new program for 8th-12th grade Girl Scouts, designed to help girls explore STEM while developing important business and presentation skills.
Budget  $131,000.00
Category  Youth Development, General/Other Youth Leadership
Population Served Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  GSOC’s robust STEM offerings for girls of all ages, including INSPIRE at the Argyros Girl Scout Leadership Center, STEM Consortium programs, robotics program, and large events like the STEM Expo will bring high quality and diverse STEM program experiences to nearly 20,000 Girl Scouts in Orange County, demonstrating STEM's relevancy to the girls' interests with the intention of helping close the STEM gender gap. GSOC’s STEM programs will get girls excited about science, technology, engineering, and math and encourage them to engage with STEM subjects in school and introduce them to exciting careers in STEM.
Program Long-Term Success  Girl Scouts involvement in STEM will contribute to GSUSA’s Girl Scout STEM Pledge—a multiyear initiative to put 2.5 million girls through our hands-on STEM programs by 2025.
Program Success Monitored By  GSOC STEM programs are monitored by post surveys and GSUSA’s national STEM Outcomes survey, which can be completed after any STEM event or activity to help track STEM outcomes - STEM interest, STEM confidence, STEM competence, and STEM value.
Examples of Program Success 
Regarding the GSOC STEM Consortium hosted simulation lab at Kaiser Permanente Orange County and earning the My STEM Life council’s Own badge for Girl Scout Cadettes.
“Before this experience, I was planning on pursuing a career in business or marketing. After being exposed to this simulation lab and seeing what this career path has to offer, I feel as though I have a greater understanding of the medical field. This opportunity has opened my eyes to more options, and I can definitely see myself pursuing STEM activities in school and in Girl Scouts. I am thankful that Kaiser Permanente gave the Girl Scouts of Orange County the chance to experience this once in a lifetime opportunity, and I believe these STEM badges will have a huge and positive impact on us in the future.” Saachi, Grade 8, Girl Scout Cadette
Regarding the new Argyros Girl Scout Leadership Center in Newport Beach, 85% of girls surveyed who experienced INSPIRE in the first year of operation say they’re now more interested in STEM.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Vikki Shepp
CEO Term Start Jan 2018
CEO Email [email protected]oc.org
CEO Experience

Over her decade-long career with Girl Scouts of Orange County, Vikki has held numerous leadership positions, including Director of Volunteer Management, Vice President of Fund Development, and Vice President of Mission Operations, where she oversaw all aspects of volunteer engagement and management, girl program, member services, and member recruitment. She previously held leadership positions with several other non-profit organizations.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Nancy Nygren -- Dec 2017

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mark Belzowski CFO/VP Business Operations --
Pat Hugon VP of Human Resources --
Connie Rodriguez Executive Administrator --
Christina Salcido VP Mission Operations --
Julie Weeks Chief Marketing Officer --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 82
Number of Part Time Staff 8
Number of Volunteers 9,000
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % --
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 13
Caucasian: 46
Hispanic/Latino: 27
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 82
Male: 8
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy --
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? --
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

--

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Governance


Board Chair Becky Bailey-Findley
Board Chair Company Affiliation California Fair Service Authority
Board Chair Term Apr 1 - Mar 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Jacqueline Akerblom Grant Thornton --
Danielle Arnerich-Combs Children's Law Center, Los Angeles --
Becky Bailey-Findley California Fair Service Authority --
Jeff Baldassari HBR Consulting --
Cyd Brandvein Google --
Geri Cerkovnik Dale Carnegie, Orange County --
Jodi Duva Cox Business Orange Coast --
Julie Farbaniec Blizzard Entertainment --
Molly Jolly Angels Baseball --
Shannon Kennedy BNY Wealth Management --
Susan King KPMG LLP --
Sharon Klein Pepper Hamilton LLP --
Rebecca Marshall Ingram Micro --
Jacquelyn Mercer Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP --
Christine Mueller Capital Group --
Gina Osborn G-Girl Productions --
Putri Pascualy PAAMCO --
Lisa Perrine Cibola Systems --
Christine Scheuneman Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP --
Vikki Shepp Girl Scouts of Orange County --
Christine Shingleton Communty Strategic Advisors --
Robert Swanson Western Digital --
Marjorie Terner Retried --
Nella Webster-O'Grady Palo Capital --
Jeff Winston Retired --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 21
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 22
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 6
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria --
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy --
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 96%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 67%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Executive
  • Finance

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year Oct 01, 2018 to Sept 30, 2019
Projected Revenue $10,962,157.00
Projected Expenses $10,510,211.00
Form 990s

2017 GSOC_FYE_2017_990

2016 GSOC_FYE_2016_990

2015 GSOC_FYE_2015_990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 GSOC_FYE_2017_Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $17,980,420 $14,713,530 $15,643,233
Total Expenses $14,779,210 $14,078,642 $14,427,261

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$3,401,320 $526,306 $620,155
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- $0 $0
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $14,086,609 $13,270,204 $13,869,410
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,140 $5,078 $8,971
Membership Dues $100,065 $0 $0
Special Events $224,027 $235,366 $263,887
Revenue In-Kind $117,922 $67,541 $150,532
Other $48,337 $676,576 $880,810

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $13,025,921 $12,580,079 $12,760,638
Administration Expense $811,434 $730,592 $805,567
Fundraising Expense $941,855 $767,971 $861,056
Payments to Affiliates -- $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.22 1.05 1.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses 88% 89% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 26% 101% 97%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $19,574,884 $15,133,396 $14,365,426
Current Assets $4,647,637 $2,791,220 $2,998,369
Long-Term Liabilities -- $0 $0
Current Liabilities $2,360,844 $1,050,824 $917,742
Total Net Assets $17,214,040 $14,082,572 $13,447,684

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.97 2.66 3.27

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose To raise funds for the Argyros Girl Scout Leadership Center in Newport Beach, GSOC's STEM hub, that provides life changing experiences and lifelong memories.
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $3,200,000.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financial statements and Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.