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Community Action Partnership of Orange County

 11870 Monarch Street
 Garden Grove, CA 92841
[P] (714) 897-6670 x 5301
[F] (714) 894-5404
www.capoc.org
www.ocfoodbank.org
[email protected]
LaShanda Maze
FOUNDED: 1965
INCORPORATED: 1966
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA Orange County Food Bank
El Modena Family Resource Center
Anaheim Independencia Family Resource Center
Energy and Environmental Services
Community Partnership and Services
Former Names Orange County Community Development Council, Inc. (1966)
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Employer Identification Number 95-2452787 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of Community Action Partnership of Orange County  is to enhance the quality of life within Orange County by eliminating and preventing the causes and effects of poverty by mobilizing and directing resources to programs that assist, educate, and promote self-sufficiency. 

Mission Statement

The mission of Community Action Partnership of Orange County  is to enhance the quality of life within Orange County by eliminating and preventing the causes and effects of poverty by mobilizing and directing resources to programs that assist, educate, and promote self-sufficiency. 

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $21,145,431.00
Projected Revenue $21,145,431.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Orange County Food Bank
  • Energy and Environmental Services Programs
  • Community Partnerships and Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

The mission of Community Action Partnership of Orange County  is to enhance the quality of life within Orange County by eliminating and preventing the causes and effects of poverty by mobilizing and directing resources to programs that assist, educate, and promote self-sufficiency. 

Background Statement

For over 50 years, our very successful partnership of community leaders, faith-based organizations, government agencies, and local businesses has brought diverse leaders together to solve community problems and has generated resources that continue helping people and changing lives. Community Action Partnership agencies across America were established through the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Subsequently, Community Action Partnership of Orange County was created to respond to President Johnson’s call to action by working everyday to help individuals overcome hunger and poverty by providing them with the tools to gain self-sufficiency.

The Partnership was instrumental in introducing Orange County to community centers, youth and adult employment programs, food and nutritional programs, transportation for senior and disabled people, community improvement, utility assistance, weatherization, health services, day care programs, emergency housing, Farm 2 Kids, Farm to Family, Head Start, Legal Aid Society, Neighborhood Youth Corps, and Community Mentor Partnership.

Today, the middle class is shrinking, good jobs have disappeared, and millions of people work in low-wage jobs that leave families in poverty. Poverty is still with us. Not every program of ours worked, but decades of research has taught us how much direct policy can accomplish. Renewing our commitment to the poor will open opportunities for more Americans and strengthen our society and economy.

When families work through our programs, they develop greater confidence and motivation to manage setbacks in their lives. At Community Action, the answer lies in empowering people to recognize and make use of their own unique strengths and resources in order to improve their lives. Our participants commit to playing the lead role in making lasting changes in their lives.


Impact Statement

Over 24 millions pounds of food (including over 3.5 million pounds of produce) were distributed to low-income children, families, seniors, and disabled persons.

Our Nutrition, Health, and Wellness programs served 23,422 individuals in improving their health through our programs.

CAP OC assisted 1,190 individuals in providing our Free Income Tax Preparation Services, receiving $1,526,214 in federal and state tax refunds.

262 parents improved their family relationships by enrolling in our Family Counseling program.

494 students were enrolled in our after-school tutoring program.


Needs Statement

  • Work to make existing energy programs more comprehensive, efficient, cost-effective, and easily accessible, setting the stage to expand our influence and services to other counties in Southern California.
  • Maintain and improve existing financial stability programs, including increased investments in the use of technology.
  • Assess, maintain, and support existing client services at our two Family Resource Centers, while expanding and improving services which are supportive of existing or new partnerships.
  • Increase agency cash reserves for six months of operating liquidity, invest in new trucks for the OC Food Bank, and commit resources for organizational development and training of the Board and staff.
  • Improve the quality of services provided to our OC Food Bank, agency, and community partners through evaluation, technical assistance, outreach, and civic engagement.
  • Organizational development and training of the Board and staff. 
         

CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement

Community Action Partnership of Orange County’s (CAPOC) exemplifies its mission and dedication to enhancing the quality of life within Orange County by eliminating and preventing the causes and effects of poverty. The Board readily embraces the mission of service to a community of diverse cultures that is merging to become and define what it means to be an American.  We recognize that our constituents are the low-income who are struggling to shed generational, implicit biasness and the anxiety of stereotypes. Many are navigating new geographical landscapes, new governmental systems and new social norms.  The CAPOC Board of Directors is committed to regularly engaging with national, state and local governments, partners and organizations, to advocate to advance the socio-economical norms of our vulnerable constituents of low-income seniors, families and youth. 

CAPOC achieves its socio-economic advancement for the low-income and vulnerable through programs that provide environmental stewardship, as we improve housing conditions and reduce energy burdens for low-income households, reduce food insecurity by providing affordable and healthier food options, teach and create financial stability through financial literacy and tax assistance programs, and work to strengthen families. We administer programs that build safe and healthy communities by improving neighborhood safety, and set paths for constituent civic participation. We also strive to increase the agency’s economic and operational efficiency, build internal and external organizational capacity, and expand existing programs.

In 2017, CAPOC assisted over 20,000 people with emergency and non-emergency utility and weatherization services. 3,179 families received emergency utility payments in times of crisis; over 7,000 school-aged children received monthly bags of fresh fruits and vegetables. 29,226 senior citizens and disabled individuals were provided with resources to maintain their independence, three students received their GED through the Department of Education’s ACCESS program located at our El Modena Family Resource Center and 794 clients, taking advantage of our free income tax preparation services, received $1,526,214 in state and federal refunds.

The services available through CAPOC are particularly personal to me. When I see people in the food lines today, I remember the times my mother would have my siblings and me wait in the car while she stood in a similar line hoping to get enough food to carry us through more than one hard time in our life. The food line wasn’t a way of life for us, but I am glad that it was there when my mom needed it to feed our family. I know what it means to need and receive help. It’s that childhood food line memory that has me here, as a board member. Giving back.

 
Alicia Berhow, CAPOC Board Chair

Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Contribute to Community Action Partnership of Orange County and contribute to our mission of helping people and changing lives.  Your donations help end poverty in Orange County and make America a better place to live, one dollar at a time. Donate by Mail-check or cash to CAPOC-Fund Development, 11870 Monarch Street, Garden Grove, CA 92841 Donate Online at www.capoc.org/getinvolved or www.ocfoodbank.org Donate Food- by calling 714-897-6670 ext. 3151

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Central Orange County
South Orange County
West Orange County
North Orange County

Community Action Partnership of Orange County’s services cover all low-income communities in Orange County, including La Habra, Stanton, Fullerton and Anaheim to Santa Ana, Garden Grove, Westminster, Costa Mesa, and other cities. Each year the agency serves more than 950,000 low-income individuals that live at or below the poverty level.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Human Services
  2. Food, Agriculture & Nutrition - Food Banks, Food Pantries
  3. Community Improvement, Capacity Building - Community & Neighbourhood Development

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Programs


Orange County Food Bank

The Orange County (OC) Food Bank is a regional food bank serving over 400 local charities, food pantries and food distribution organizations working together to end hunger and malnutrition in Orange County. The OC Food Bank serves those who have incomes at or below the Federal Poverty Guidelines which includes low-income seniors, families, individuals, and children. In 2016, the Orange County Food Bank distributed 22,403,928 pounds of food to nearly 400 providers. The Food Bank solicits donated food from the food industry and work with farmers to bring fresh produce to feed the hungry. The Orange County Food Bank also operates the Farm to Seniors & Farm to Family programs which provide fresh produced sourced from local farms. The Food Bank also operates the following:

Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP): Community Action Partnership of Orange County Commodity Supplemental Food Program distributes approximately 23,675 food boxes per month to eligible seniors, pregnant women and infants to 50 distribution sites. In 2016, CSFP distributed a total of 280, 875 food boxes.

The Emergency Food Assistant Program (TEFAP): A federal program administered by the OC Food Bank that helps supplement the diets of low-income people, seniors, by providing them with emergency food, at no cost.

CalFresh/SNAP (Foodstamps) Outreach: CalFresh application assistance is offered at Community Action Partnership family resource centers. Eligible households are encouraged to participate in Application Assistance Workshops that are offered in cooperation with the Orange County Social Services Agency. These workshops are offered monthly.

Donated Food Program: Food and personal care items donated by the food industry and food drives. These goods are supplied to local charities who provide them to needy people in their community.

Budget  $10,815,497.00
Category  Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food Distribution
Population Served At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Other Economic Level
Program Short-Term Success 

Improve the quality of services provided to OC Food Bank agency and community partners through evaluation, technical assistance, outreach, and civic engagement.

Program Long-Term Success 

Reduce food insecurity/hunger and provide healthier food options for low-income families by increasing food availability.

Program Success Monitored By 

At the end of 2016, the Orange County Food Bank successfully distributed more than 22 million pounds of food, including 3.4 million pound of fresh produce to 197,420 families.


Examples of Program Success 

Cheng and Vivian are enrolled in the OC Food Bank’s senior food box program. Due to limitations, they are unable to work and have a very limited monthly income. They live in Section 8 housing and must borrow their son’s car every time they need to travel somewhere. Food sold in the supermarket is too expensive for their household. Receiving a monthly food box means they can spend their limited income on other necessities, such a rent and medicine. Cheng loves that our food boxes have a variety of healthy and nutritious food for the two of them to prepare and eat at home. The couple is grateful for the compassionate assistance of the OC Food Bank and note that having a support systems keeps them from feeling lonely. Names have been changed to protect the identity of our clients.


Energy and Environmental Services Programs

Weatherization Services

Our Energy & Environmental Service Programs helps low-income clients who need assistance paying their utilities, receive discounts, receive assistance during crisis and learn through consumer education how to conserve energy and reduce their energy burdens that results in savings.

Community Action Partnership of Orange County, Energy and Environmental Services Department oversee administration of the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP), and the Department of Energy’s Weatherization Assistance Program (DOE WAP) in Orange County.

Weatherization Services are available to homeowners and renters to assist in lowering monthly electric and gas bills. Our HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) services provide qualifying households with assistance in cleaning, tuning, or replacing heaters and air conditioners.

The Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) is a one-time per funding year assistance program that helps income qualified households with utility payment assistance on either their electric or gas bill in Orange County.

All Utility Assistance, Weatherization, and HVAC services are free of charge to qualifying households.

Budget  $7,230,102.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Energy Resources
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Work to make existing energy programs more comprehensive, efficient, cost-effective, and easily accessible, setting the stage to expand our influence and services to other counties in Southern California.

Program Long-Term Success 

Improve housing conditions and reduce energy burdens for low-income households through financial assistance, enhanced energy efficiency programs, and increased parity with energy efficient programs offered to the mainstream market.

Program Success Monitored By  .
Examples of Program Success 

Mrs. Nguyen, a 67 year old woman was a having a hard time paying for her energy bills. On a fixed income, Mrs. Nguyen found it difficult to pay for her utilities especially during the hot months. Mrs. Nguyen reached out to Community Action Partnership of Orange County (CAPOC) to assist her during this difficult time. CAPOC completed an energy audit, and provided her with energy saving devices, appliances and weatherized her home, which resulted in cost savings of 65%.

In 2016, we provided 21,795 individuals with emergency and non-emergency utility, assisted 552 households in reducing utility bills through energy efficient measures, and provided 3,025 families with emergency utility assistance.


Community Partnerships and Services

Community Partnerships and Services Department works to strengthen individuals and families; providing health, family development, financial stability, workforce development, and community engagement services and activities.  In partnership with other agencies we identify opportunities for leadership to change individuals and communities.

Family Resource Centers: Anaheim Independencia Center and El Modena Center, help families become safe and stable. The centers provide free tax preparation services, emergency assistance, youth programs, case management, counseling, parenting classes, hot lunches for seniors and youth, domestic violence prevention, adult education (ESL), leadership development/civic engagement/community events. 
 
OC Healthy Marriage and Relationship Program: County-Wide project to provide culturally competent healthy marriage and relationship training for singles and couples.
 
Nutrition, Health, Wellness: includes a Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Program.
 
 
Budget  $2,336,761.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Family-Based Services
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Maintain and improve existing financial stability programs, including increased investments in the use of technology.

Program Long-Term Success 

Creating Financial Stability: Create financial stability programs and services that train and support families during a financial crisis and prepare them for economic growth and self-sufficiency.

Program Success Monitored By 

Program success is measured by community surveys, parent feedback, community leadership involvement and workshop enrollment numbers.

Examples of Program Success 

 In 2017:

  • CAPOC assisted 1,190 individuals in providing our Free Income Tax Preparation Services, with $1,526,214 in federal and state tax refunds.
  • 262 parents improved their family relationships by enrolling in our Family Counseling program.
  • 494 students were enrolled in our after-school tutoring program.
  • 25 homeless individuals received shelter at low-rental housing units through our Anaheim Independencia Family Resource Center.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gregory C. Scott
CEO Term Start Jan 2018
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Mr. Scott has worked extensively in the private and non-profit sectors focusing on social justice, diversity, education, youth development, poverty, financial stability, food and hunger, affordable housing, homelessness, veteran issues, and was considered to be the best choice to tackle the challenges facing low-income residents in Orange County. A longtime Orange County resident, Mr. Scott has served as a member of the Board of Directors for the Orange County YMCA Community Services Branch, is a board member for Holman Community Development Corporation, the South Los Angeles Collaborative for Transitional Aged Youth, and the Southern California Counseling Center (SCCC). Mr. Scott, originally from Paterson, NJ, holds a Bachelor’s degree from William Paterson University and a Master of Science degree in Community Economic Development from Southern New Hampshire University.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Clarence Ray June 1986 Aug 2017

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mrs. Christine Baginski -- --
Ms Dolores Barrett Director of Community Partnerships & Services --
Mr. Malcolm Brown Director of Finance --
Mr. Curtis Gibbs Director of Planning and Fund Development --
Mr Mark Lowry Orange County Food Bank Director --
Ms. LaShanda Maze -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Business of the Year Garden Grove Chamber of Commerce 2018
Spirit of Volunteerism One OC 2013

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
GroundWork Group 2011
United Way Member Agency 1998

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

The agency is actively engaged and participates in at least 20 community collaborations. Our OC Food Bank has a network of over 400 community organizations such as food pantries, food banks, and food programs that distribute food.

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 108
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 11,000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 74%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 20
Caucasian: 22
Hispanic/Latino: 59
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 3
Other (if specified): Two or more races
Gender Female: 67
Male: 43
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Under Development
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

--

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Governance


Board Chair Alicia Berhow
Board Chair Company Affiliation OC Business Council
Board Chair Term June 2018 - July 2019
Board Co-Chair Vijay Chidambaram
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation CMLA
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Vijay Chidambaram CMLA/Capital Group --
Alberta Christy Appointed by Orange County Supervisor Andrew Do --
James Colquitt NAACP --
Patricia Healy Appointed by Orange County Supervisor Todd Spitzer --
Michael Hernandez -- --
Connie J. Jones SMEDA --
Nahla Kayali ACCESS CA. --
Joshua Mino -- --
William O'Connell Colette's Children's Home --
Ph.D. Anuradha Prakash Chapman University --
Amelia Ramos-Moreno -- --
Rhonda Reardon Appointed by Orange County Supervisor Lisa A. Barlett --
Doug Vogel -- --
Ph.D. Burt Winer Institute of Advanced Studies --
Douglas Wooley -- --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 27
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 13
Caucasian: 33
Hispanic/Latino: 20
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): 1 (Med East)
Gender Female: 53
Male: 47
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

Community Action Partnership of Orange County’s (CAP OC) exemplifies its mission and dedication to enhancing the quality of life within Orange County by eliminating and preventing the causes and effects of poverty. The Board readily embraces the mission of service to a community of diverse cultures that is merging to become and define what it means to be an American. We recognize that our constituents are the low-income who are struggling to shed generational, implicit biasness and the anxiety of stereotypes. Many are navigating new geographical landscapes, new governmental systems and new social norms. The CAP OC Board of Directors is committed to regularly engaging with national, state and local governments, partners and organizations, to advocate to advance the socio-economical norms of our vulnerable constituents of low-income seniors, families and youth.

CAP OC achieves its socio-economic advancement for the low-income and vulnerable through programs that provide environmental stewardship, as we improve housing conditions and reduce energy burdens for low-income households, reduce food insecurity by providing affordable and healthier food options, teach and create financial stability through financial literacy and tax assistance programs, and work to strengthen families. We administer programs that build safe and healthy communities by improving neighborhood safety, and set paths for constituent civic participation. We also strive to increase the agency’s economic and operational efficiency, build internal and external organizational capacity, and expand existing programs.

In 2016, CAP OC assisted over 20,000 people with emergency and non-emergency utility and weatherization services. 3,025 families received emergency utility payments in times of crisis; over 7,000 school-aged children received monthly bags of fresh fruits and vegetables. 29,588 senior citizens and disabled individuals were provided with resources to maintain their independence, three students received their GED through the Department of Education’s ACCESS program located at our El Modena Family Resource Center and 794 clients, taking advantage of our free income tax preparation services, received $1,024,378 in state and federal refunds.

Thank you,

 Alicia Berhow, CAP OC Board Chair 

Foundation Comments

--

Standing Committees

  • Administration
  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Operations
  • Program / Program Planning

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $21,923,220 $20,423,647 $21,514,217
Total Expenses $21,905,126 $20,189,138 $18,496,111

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,392,911 $1,487,590 $1,602,146
Government Contributions $19,866,106 $18,045,411 $19,267,777
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $19,866,106 $18,045,411 $19,267,777
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $605,231 $759,287 $611,570
Investment Income, Net of Losses $8,990 $11,533 $13,455
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events $23,487 $103,030 $0
Revenue In-Kind -- $6,763,577 $9,760,253
Other $26,495 $-86,234 $19,269

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $20,236,715 $18,458,873 $16,727,890
Administration Expense $1,341,444 $1,371,872 $1,358,170
Fundraising Expense $326,967 $358,393 $410,051
Payments to Affiliates -- $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.01 1.16
Program Expense/Total Expenses 92% 91% 90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 2% 2% 2%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $12,428,116 $11,596,507 $11,758,292
Current Assets $7,869,863 $6,758,949 $6,502,043
Long-Term Liabilities $2,170,919 $1,289,560 $1,602,778
Current Liabilities $984,180 $1,052,024 $1,135,100
Total Net Assets $9,273,017 $9,254,923 $9,020,414

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 8.00 6.42 5.73

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 17% 11% 14%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

CEO Comments


Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financial statements, form 990s and consultation with the organization. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.