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Speech and Language Development Center

 8699 Holder Street
 Buena Park, CA 90620
[P] (714) 821-3620 x 226
[F] (714) 821-5683
www.sldc.net
[email protected]
April  Barnes
FOUNDED: 1955
INCORPORATED: 1964
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA SLDC
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 95-2162129 00000

Summary


https://youtu.be/K41EPeQFl5g

Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of SLDC is to assist children and adults with special needs maximize their potential through education and therapy provided in an environment nurturing growth and inspiring achievement.

Mission Statement

The mission of SLDC is to assist children and adults with special needs maximize their potential through education and therapy provided in an environment nurturing growth and inspiring achievement.


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $12,554,323.00
Projected Revenue $12,575,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • SLDC Elementary and High Schools
  • Jolin Program (Infant Development)
  • Jolin Program - Preschool to Elementary
  • Elementary/Junior High
  • High School Transition Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

The mission of SLDC is to assist children and adults with special needs maximize their potential through education and therapy provided in an environment nurturing growth and inspiring achievement.


Background Statement

SLDC was founded in 1955 when two speech therapists, Aleen Agranowitz and Gladys Gleason, began working with a small group of children who had speech, language, learning and behavior problems, from the living room of Ms. Agranowitz’ Long Beach home. The number of children coming for therapy and diagnosis grew rapidly and, with the support of a volunteer board of directors, the organization became a nonprofit officially called Speech and Language Development Center. Today, Speech and Language Development Center is one of the largest accredited, single-site, non-public Pre-K through Post-12 schools in California and a state and national leader in its field. We are a member of numerous groups including the California Association of Private Special Education Schools where our chief executive officer serves as a board member.


Impact Statement

SLDC serves infants, children, teens and young adults who have disabilities and who require a specialized program of education and therapy that cannot be provided through their public school system. We serve children from 6 months to 22 years of age. SLDC students have disabling conditions that necessitate individualized and adaptive services to assist them to achieve gains in learning, communication and socialization. Our students have diagnoses including, but not limited to, Autism Spectrum Disorders (more than 60%) Down syndrome, learning disabilities, emotional and behavioral problems, visual deficits, language-learning disorders, seizures and traumatic brain injuries. About one-third of our students are hearing impaired and one-third are non-verbal. Annually, approximately 320 students from 68 school districts and Regional Centers in Southern California (primarily in Los Angeles and Orange counties) are enrolled at our Buena Park campus.


Needs Statement

Currently, Speech and Language Development Center in Buena Park has need of the following:
1)  Funding for music and art programming
2)  Funding for iPads and other assistive technologies
3)  Funding for exercise and training equipment for the Fitness Center
4)  Funding to purchase a school bus
5)  Funding for technology (infrastructure; IT)
6)  Funding for general operations

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Donations can be made to Speech and Language Development Center, 8699 Holder St., Buena Park, CA 90620-3614.  The agency can receive online donations at their website, www.sldc.net. All donations are tax-deductible, as per IRS regulations. Volunteers are invited to support annual events including the Coaster Run, Afternoon Tea and Golf Tournament. To volunteer, please contact SLDC Development Office at (714) 821-3620 ext. 226. 

Geographic Area Served

Central Orange County
West Orange County
South Orange County
North Orange County
SLDC serves children and youth from throughout Orange County and Los Angeles County. Students from 64 school districts in both counties are referred to SLDC for specialized educational services and therapy.  As well, our preschool serves children and families from the northwest Orange County area.

Organization Categories

  1. Education - Special Education
  2. Education - Elementary & Secondary Schools
  3. Education - Student Services

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Programs


SLDC Elementary and High Schools

SLDC offers California standards-based curriculum for students in grades Kindergarten through post 12th, yet designed with specialized approaches and program enhancements to meet the unique learning needs of our student population.  SLDC has an elementary school program and a high school program. Students can continue attending high school through age 22. The basic curriculum includes math, reading, science, arts, social science and history. SLDC's specialized therapies and services includes:
  • Adapted Physical Education
  • Speech and Language Therapy (assessment and therapy)
  • Augmentative/Alternative Communication Therapy and other assistive technology
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Physical Therapy
  • Counseling
  • Audiological services
  • Fine Arts including visual arts, crafts and music
  • The use of SMART Boards, iPads and other learning resources
  • Computer Lab
  • Vocational services
  • Community Socialization Training
  • A fully adaptive physical campus
Budget  $2,147,989.00
Category  Education, General/Other Special Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term success is defined as making progress toward measurable goals that are established for each student as part of his/her Individual Education Plan. Typically, individualized goals and objectives are created for each student for each new school year. 
Program Long-Term Success  Long-term success is defined by enabling each student to achieve their potential. Each student has an individualized education plan (IEP) that defines his or her short- and long-term educational goals. Goals also include activities of daily living, independence, communication, socialization, job-readiness and more. Long-term success is completely individualized and as unique as each SLDC student is. 
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored by the child's teachers and therapists, as well as by SLDC's principals and CEO. An IEP meeting is held annually with school and district representatives, with the child's parent or legal guardian. This is where the child's progress is discussed, where services are prescribed and tailored to the child, and where measurable and time-based goals are established. 
Examples of Program Success  To come

Jolin Program (Infant Development)

The Jolin Infant Development Program is a Reverse Inclusion program designed to integrate children with special needs and neuro-typical children in the same classroom for the entirety of the school day.

The Jolin Infant Development Program’s goal is to educate and remediate developmental delays within a transdisciplinary approach towards attainment of typical developmental levels. Typically-developing children are included in this program to provide language, speech, and social modeling. Typical children also thrive in this environment as they are able to move through the early childhood curriculum at an accelerated rate due to the ratio of one educator per every three children.

This program serves students from the age of 18 months to three years. At three years of age children may enter our preschool age program which is an extension of the Infant program and also is fully included. The classrooms are staffed with appropriately certificated or credentialed teachers including special education teachers, early childhood specialists, and teaching assistants with early childhood units.

A specific program is also maintained for children under the age of three years who have been identified as having specific delays in the acquisition of speech and language skills. These children attend a minimum of two days per week and again these classes are taught by certified or credentialed teachers. Typically developing children are included as peer models for speech and language. Children with cognitive, language, learning, behavioral, social, fine/gross motor, and sensory modulation difficulties are eligible for enrollment as well as typically developing children in need of child care or more individualized attention and therapeutic programming.

Budget  $902,911.00
Category  Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Program Short-Term Success  The assessment of the student and cooperating with the referring organization to see that the student is placed in the most appropriate program.
Program Long-Term Success  The population of children 0 to 5 is a primary target of most organizations directed and funded to serve children with presenting challenges. For the children in this age range, the greatest success is to promote students into mainstream services, i.e., their public school. 
Program Success Monitored By  Each child referred to SLDC due to special needs is evaluated on their Education Plan. That evaluation is made by the referring agency, staff at SLDC and the primary care-giver, whether that be the parents or someone else bearing responsibility for the well being of the child.
Examples of Program Success  The story of Sally.

Jolin Program - Preschool to Elementary

The Jolin Preschool / Elementary Program offers the Reverse Inclusion Model in which typically developing peers attend preschool with children who have disabilities.  The Preschool Program offers a rich environment for learning, play, recreation and child development. It features:
  • Small Group Occupational Therapy
  • Small Group Speech Therapy
  • Certified / Licensed Teachers
  • First Aid / CPR Trained staff
  • Toilet Training available
  • Bilingual staff
  • Spacious, gated playground
  • Individualized preschool curriculum
  • Low student to staff ratio
  • Language enrichment
  • Social Communication groups
  • Structured classroom setting
  • Natural Environment
The Jolin Elementary Program is a Reverse Inclusion program designed to integrate students with special needs and general education students in the same classroom for the entire school day. The Program was created with a goal of preparing students with special needs to return to their home district. Involves an intensive educational programs as well as social skills training.

 

Budget  $932,396.00
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities Children Only (5 - 14 years) People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  In the Jolin Program, preschoolers develop language skills, basic math and literacy skills that prepare them for kindergarten, basic listening, reading, communication and social development skills that are age- and developmentally appropriate.  Group and individualized goals and objectives are established to support the needs and potential of each child.
Program Long-Term Success  Jolin's innovative setting, where regular and special education students share the same classroom, has tremendous benefits for all students in these classes. In addition, Full Inclusion classes create an opportunity for challenged and typically-developing siblings to attend the same school.
Program Success Monitored By  Teachers, staff and therapists monitor program success on a programmatic basis, as well as on an individual basis.
Examples of Program Success  Success for students in the Jolin program has many different definitions. For some, it may be kindergarten-readiness. For others, it may be the ability to communicate a need or the demonstrate an appropriate social behavior.

Elementary/Junior High

The Elementary/Junior High Program provides daily educational services to special education students whose needs cannot be met within public school programs. This program serves students from the age of four years to fourteen years. Classrooms are staffed by appropriately credentialed special education teachers as well as qualified full-time para-professionals.
 
A typical classroom can serve up to 12 students, however final classroom size is determined by the intensity of student needs. The adult/student ratio is no more than 3:1 and often includes 1:1 support. Individual student support is based on needs identified in the IEP and is a part of the student contract. 
 
The curriculum in the Eric program is based on California State Standards utilizing text books identified by the local school district. The curriculum for many students is modified based on the SEACO (Special Educators of County Offices) Guide, CARS (California Association of Resource Specialists), and Basics 2. All of these curriculum guides follow California State Standards strands. A variety of specialized techniques and approaches are utilized based on the individual needs of the student (Touch Math, Language! reading program, Handwriting Without Tears, etc.). 
 

Along with the incorporation of State content standards in all academic areas and individual services defined on specific IEP’s, the Elementary/Junior High program offers the following program or activity components:

 
Budget  $3,220,519.00
Category  Education, General/Other Special Education
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success  The goal of the program is to provide intensive educational instruction to the extent that students are able to return to, and benefit from, their local district programs.
Program Long-Term Success  The goal of the program is to provide intensive educational instruction to the extent that students are able to return to, and benefit from, their local district programs.
Program Success Monitored By  Progress reports based on goals and objectives are typically completed quarterly.
Examples of Program Success 

Success for students in the Jolin program has many different definitions. For some, it may be readiness to return to their referring district. For others, it may be the ability to communicate a need or the demonstrate an appropriate social behavior.


High School Transition Program

The High School-Transition Program serves young persons, ages 15-21 years. It provides transitional and vocational services to assist post-high school students to integrate in the community and to gain increased independence.  The program utilizes both the community and the campus as learning environments. Students regularly attend community-based employment programs and/or college classes. The Transition Program features:
  • Vocational activities in community
  • Paid with paychecks (WorkAbilityI grant)
  • Assistance in passing GED
  • Career assessments; job search skills; employment applications; mobility training; partnerships with Regional Occupational Program; Cypress College
  • Academics per IEP

The High School Transition Program is an important component of SLDC’s academic offerings.

SLDC has numerous connections with the local community and businesses. The latter are very supportive of our students and welcome them every year. There are four full-time Counselors at SLDC who work in conjunction with SLDC staff to address issues that occur at the students’ work place. Our teaching, DIS services, counselors, and WA1 staff work with the outgoing students during their last year to transition them to their home community.

More specifically, the WorkAbility Grant provides funding for job coaches and student paychecks. In addition, parents/guardians are assisted in the necessary processes for obtaining SSI, California ID’s, and reduced fare bus transportation. Informative meetings are held to discuss issues such as conservatorships, and after-graduation programs.


 

Budget  $2,508,809.00
Category  Education, General/Other Vocational Education
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Short-term success may be defined as preparing the student for such things as employment in the community, how to use public transportation, how to manage their paycheck, enrollment in college, and other indicators of increased self-sufficiency.
Program Long-Term Success  Long-term success may be defined as preparing the student for such things as employment in the community, how to use public transportation, how to manage their paycheck, enrollment in college, and other indicators of increased self-sufficiency.
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is measured by instructors, therapists and other program personnel. Tools included the student's Individual Education Plan and other program-related measurements. All lesson plans are taught and progress is measured according to a student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The development of language skills, reading, comprehension and communication are integrated throughout the SLDC curriculum. Specialized needs include delayed auditory processing, concept formation, conversational skills, articulation and vocabulary growth.
Examples of Program Success  To come

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Adrienne Kessler
CEO Term Start Nov 2016
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Adrienne Kessler’s passion for supporting individuals with disabilities began more than twenty years ago when providing in home ABA to children with Autism and related disorders. She was inspired by the unique gifts her students and devoted to ensuring individuals with all abilities have access to quality services. This passion led her to earning a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Concordia University, her Master’s degree in Education from Pepperdine University and later her BCBA certification, completing her graduate coursework at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Recently, she completed her Doctorate in Organizational Leadership, from the University of La Verne. Over the years she has served in progressive leadership roles in public schools, for-profit and non-profit organizations. Today she continues to seek opportunities to include, support and celebrate the unique abilities of individuals with special needs.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mrs. Dawn O' Connor July 2008 Oct 2016
Dr. Aleen Agranowitz Ed.D. Feb 1955 June 2008

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mrs. April Barnes Director of Development

April is originally from Philadelphia, but has embraced the California lifestyle. She has been in non-profit development management for over 15 years and brings skills in relationship building, event management, brand awareness, and marketing to SLDC. She has a Masters in Business Administration from University of Phoenix.

Michelle Kelly Director of Human Resources --
Jennifer O' Grady Director of Education --
Mr. Martin Pugno Director of Finance --
Juan Zepeda Director of Program Development --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Program of the Year CASHA 2008

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

SLDC collaborates with 62 school districts in Orange and Los Angeles counties.

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 153
Number of Part Time Staff 83
Number of Volunteers 57
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate % 88%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: --
Asian American/Pacific Islander: --
Caucasian: --
Hispanic/Latino: --
Native American/American Indian: --
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 159
Male: 77
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy --
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually

Government Licenses

--

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Mr. Gaston Valdovinos
Board Chair Company Affiliation Pilot
Board Chair Term July 2018 - June 2020
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Mr. James Amato Community Member Voting
Mr. Dinko Bozanich J.D. County of Los Angeles D.A. - Retired Voting
Mr. Gary Elder Self-employed, construction management Voting
Mr. Thomas Gieser -- Voting
Mr. Robert Lowe -- Voting
Mr. Howard Platte Golden Empire Mortgage Voting
Mr. Ron Rothschild Self & O’Shea, Divine & Company Voting
Mrs. Janet Thomas -- Voting
Mr. Gaston Valdovinos -- Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 1
Male: 8
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 76%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 0%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Building
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Revenue $12,575,000.00
Projected Expenses $12,554,323.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 IRS Form 990

2012 IRS Form 990

Audit Documents

2017 Audit Report

2012 Audit Report

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $10,845,936 $10,774,123 $10,191,716
Total Expenses $10,624,014 $10,584,061 $10,038,398

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$163,952 $420,439 $476,208
Government Contributions $63,600 $63,600 $63,600
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $63,600 $63,600 $63,600
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support $0 $0 $0
Earned Revenue $10,325,219 $9,806,948 $9,378,109
Investment Income, Net of Losses $2,273 $2,712 $2,649
Membership Dues $2,684 $2,640 $2,478
Special Events $285,086 $446,147 $171,856
Revenue In-Kind $0 $0 $0
Other $3,122 $31,637 $96,816

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $9,623,380 $9,549,449 $9,017,270
Administration Expense $866,276 $917,530 $892,905
Fundraising Expense $134,358 $117,082 $128,223
Payments to Affiliates $0 $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.02 1.02 1.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses 91% 90% 90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 26% 13% 18%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $9,060,608 $8,879,983 $8,852,693
Current Assets $5,206,419 $5,040,966 $4,964,438
Long-Term Liabilities $370,301 $405,692 $560,309
Current Liabilities $25,483 $31,389 $39,544
Total Net Assets $8,664,824 $8,442,902 $8,252,840

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 204.31 160.60 125.54

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 4% 5% 6%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.