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Goodwill Industries of Orange County California

 410 North Fairview Street
 Santa Ana, CA 92703
[P] (714) 547-6308 x 352
[F] (714) 835-6675
www.ocgoodwill.org
[email protected]
Philip Fukuto
FOUNDED: 1924
INCORPORATED: 1924
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA Assistive Technology Exchange Center (ATEC)
Goodwill of Orange County
Tierney Center for Veteran Services
Rogers A. Severson Fitness and Technology Center
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 95-1644018 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

 Our Mission is Sure: Goodwill is in the business of helping people who are facing barriers to get and keep jobs, which provides purpose, pride, and dignity.

We believe the power of work changes lives.

Our Vision is Clear: Over the next five years we intend to double the number of people we serve by providing services that are innovative and driven by the needs of the community.

 

Mission Statement

 Our Mission is Sure: Goodwill is in the business of helping people who are facing barriers to get and keep jobs, which provides purpose, pride, and dignity.

We believe the power of work changes lives.

Our Vision is Clear: Over the next five years we intend to double the number of people we serve by providing services that are innovative and driven by the needs of the community.

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2018
Projected Expenses $89,932,029.00
Projected Revenue $92,516,237.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Job Placement & Support
  • Education and Job Training
  • Assistive Technology Services
  • Rogers A Severson Fitness and Technology Center
  • Tierney Centers for Veteran Services

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

 Our Mission is Sure: Goodwill is in the business of helping people who are facing barriers to get and keep jobs, which provides purpose, pride, and dignity.

We believe the power of work changes lives.

Our Vision is Clear: Over the next five years we intend to double the number of people we serve by providing services that are innovative and driven by the needs of the community.

 


Background Statement

Since 1924, Goodwill of Orange County has helped people with disabilities and other barriers find employment, become independent and support themselves and their families. We’re proud of our heritage and have a rich, active history in the local community:

  • Goodwill Industries was founded in 1902 by Reverend Edgar J. Helms in Boston Massachusetts
  • Goodwill of Orange County opened its doors in 1924 as a branch of the Los Angeles-based Goodwill Industries of Southern California
  • Our Orange County operation began as a storefront on Fourth Street in Santa Ana and has since become a well-recognized community service provider and leading employer with more than 1,000 employees and an annual budget of more than $76 million
  • We serve more than 1,000 children and adults with disabilities and other barriers to independence each day

Along the way we’ve earned a number of accolades:

  • Goodwill of Orange County is a responsible nonprofit agency, with 91 cents of every dollar spent going directly to our services for people with disabilities and other barriers to independence
  • We’re recognized as one of the seven Best Companies to Work for in Orange County by OC Metro Magazine
  • Goodwill of Orange County has received its fourth consecutive 4-star rating from Charity Navigator, America's premier independent charity evaluator, for effectiveness, organizational, and efficiency
  • We’ve been voted Best Thrift Store by The Orange County Register readers too many times to count and are currently the #2 Vintage store in OC
  • Launched shopgoodwill.com in 2000 and was named among "TIME.com 50 Best Web Sites of 2009."
  • The first and only Goodwill to create the Goodwill Fitness Program for people with disabilities and chronic illness
  • We have consistently achieved three-year CARF (The Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission) Accreditation since 1980

Impact Statement

 Goodwill Brand We are committed to preserving and promoting the Goodwill Brand. We respect its inherent value and impact.   

Independence We dedicate ourselves to promoting self-reliance and well-being at every touch point of the organization.  We believe in the power of work; it provides a pathway to independence. 

People Working and Learning Together  We appreciate the abilities and perspectives of our diverse team. We foster a participatory workplace and engage in informed decision making about achieving common goals.

Innovation and Growth  We embrace innovation to be an agile, results-driven leader. We must generate superior returns on the assets entrusted to us, returning even greater value to the community.  

Integrity  We practice the highest ethical standards and embrace a culture of kindness. We take responsibility for our actions and treat everyone fairly with compassion and respect. 

Accountability  We strive for accountability and transparency. We invite inquiry, ideas, and critique in every area of our work. 

Customer Satisfaction  We recognize that satisfied, loyal customers are essential to our success. Customer service is our competitive edge and we seek to deliver it flawlessly.  

Environmental Responsibility  We are committed to helping the community achieve its reuse, recycle and repurposing goals. We will minimize the impact of our own operations on the environment. 


Needs Statement

Adults with disabilities experience significant difficulty securing employment in Orange County. These populations often face chronic unemployment, underemployment and no career growth. According to the Office of Disability Employment Policy, the unemployment rate for adults with developmental disabilities remains higher than (area & industry specific) the rate for adults with other barriers. In Orange County where there is a growing skills gap, this rate almost doubles.  According to a 2009 report from The Workforce Alliance, California must make significant investments in training programs that will prepare many more California residents-laid off workers, workers in low-wage jobs, potential workers with low basic skills-for better, more plentiful middle-skill jobs and careers. It is imperative that programs and services be available that move low-wage and low-skilled workers into jobs and careers and industry sectors that pay a livable wage – including workers with disabilities. Building a workforce to address high-growth industries will furthermore meet the workforce needs of those industries.

Tierney Center for Veteran Services: According to the 2010 Census, Orange County's population includes 136,611 veterans. Of this figure, 10,519 are post-9/11 service veterans. The California Department of Veterans Affairs (CalVet) reports Orange County has the third largest number of veterans of any California county, and that more than 275,000 post-9/11 veterans will settle in Orange County in the years to come. Unlike their predecessors, today's service men and women are returning from multiple deployments and with increasing mental health diagnoses and physical disabilities sustained during combat. Orange County's close proximity to San Diego makes it a desirable location for marines, sailors and soldiers transitioning from active duty to civilian life.  It is estimated that more than 275,000 post-9/11 veterans will settle in Orange County and a large percentage will resettle in Orange County given the proximity to Camp Pendleton.

Rogers A Severson Fitness and Technology Center: Not only can a physical disability or chronic medical condition impact one’s ability to secure or keep a job, it can cause or exacerbate secondary problems such as sores from immobility, poor circulation, renal or skin conditions, decreased muscle tone and strength, diabetes, joint conditions, pain, cardiovascular disease and more. Goodwill recognized this closely related aspect of personal well-being and addressed it by building Orange County’s only fully accessible fitness center. Prior to opening the Fitness Center in 2008, there were 600 fitness centers in Orange County but not one facility fully accessible or designed for the unique needs of people with disabilities and chronic illness.

Assistive Technology Exchange Center: Before the advent of Assistive Technology, many persons with severe disabilities were trapped in their bodies unable to communicate their basic needs, hopes or dreams. It is estimated that 90% of all behavioral problems in children develop as a result of that inability. According to the Children and Families Commission of Orange County’s Conditions of Children in Orange County, only about 72% of children with a developmental diagnosis are receiving the services they need to succeed. In addition, there has been a steady decline in services for children under the age of five (Conditions of Children 20 (Supplemental)). Early intervention is crucial to the personal and educational success and ATEC's impact has increased along with the earlier diagnoses of developmental disabilities such as autism and cerebral palsy. This has led to innovations and advances in the field of AT as the earlier a child can be fitted with a piece of AT, the greater their chances of achieving independence later in life.  Adults, as well, are experiencing the tremendous benefits of using assistive technology to mitigate barriers posed by stroke, injury or other disabling condition. Even small enhancements in motor coordination or speech can represent significantly improved quality of life.



CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

 Get rid of clutter and donate your unwanted items to Goodwill. Shop at one of our 24 stores throughout Orange County or from the convenience of home at shopgoodwill.comMake a financial gift to help us provide people with a path to independence including employment. Take a tour to see firsthand how lives are changed thanks to our programs and services.Get rid of unused electronics whether they work or not, because we recycle, re-new or reuse e-waste to give them a second life. Hire and work with our program participants and join the dozens of local businesses who have created jobs for our Goodwill-trained workers.

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Central Orange County
West Orange County
South Orange County
North Orange County
Orange County, California

Organization Categories

  1. Employment - Goodwill Industries
  2. Human Services - Centers to Support the Independence of Specific Populations
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Military/Veterans' Organizations

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Programs


Job Placement & Support

To support each individual's quest for employment and self-sufficiency, Goodwill Ind. of Orange County (Goodwill) operates a comprehensive workforce development program. Accredited at the highest level, the program includes full assessment/evaluation, job seeking skills training classes, occupational skills training, on-the-job-training, intensive job placement and support services including, job-retention, on-the-job-support, and follow-up, transportation, assistive technology, physical fitness and therapy, and interpreting.

Case management of each participant ensures that employment barriers are identified and resources are accessed, either through Goodwill or in the community. Each program participant works closely with a staff member to develop an Individualized Employment Plan (IEP). The IEP contains short-term and long-term employment goals and a timeline of measurable objectives based upon vocational assessment results, case manager's input, interview with participant and other indicators. Objectives may include, but not be limited to, attendance goals, performance goals, participation in available Goodwill classes, quality of life indicators. It also includes information on relevant jobs available in the employment market, training needs, barriers to the achievement and maintenance of employment, community resources for assistance in addressing employment barriers, individualized environmental, assistive technology, or job-task modifications required for employment, transportation considerations and other recommendations, as needed. Program participants are referred by a variety of human services agencies including One-Stop Centers, veterans agencies, disability organizations, county government agencies i.e. Health Care Agency and Social Services Agency. Geographically, Goodwill provides services throughout Orange County through six program offices, 20 retail stores, and three partner agencies.

 

Budget  $73,000,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Job Training & Employment
Population Served Adults People/Families with of People with Disabilities Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 
 1. Increase number of people served by 30% over last year.
 
2. Establish five new strategic partnerships.                       
 
3. Increase business and mission services in South County.
Program Long-Term Success 
 1. Increase number of people served and placed annually from 8,667 to 11,000.
 
2. Expand the number of people placed into employment from 410 to 1000.
 
3. Increase mission services in South County by 50%.
 
4. Expand major key community partnerships (businesses, government, & nonprofits) by 25.
 
5. Be the community resource for people with disabilities and other barriers
Program Success Monitored By 

At GIOC, customer satisfaction and accountability are two of its key values. Therein three levels of evaluation and Quality Control exist: 1) agency, 2) program, and 3) individual program participant.

 

Goodwill utilizes several methods to ensure goals and quality standards are met or exceeded and that improvements are made in such areas as response time, cycle time, internal processes, prevention of quality infractions and more. 


1.     
Agency

GIOC utilizes the “Balanced Score Card” (BSC) performance management tool which is designed to create and maintain a culture of performance through managing metrics, scorecards (BSC), dashboards, initiatives, and plans. It aligns business functions to strategy and assists with effectively communicating the strategy. It also helps us identify problem areas and the root causes. In the near future the BSC tool will help in forecasting, trends, year to date data, etc.

 2.     Program
 
The weeklyGIOC Education, Training and Employment Services Service Summary Reportindicates the numbers of clients served and the number of job placements versus service goals.

 

GIOC’sClient Tracking Reportindicates the number of clients served in each Education, Training and Employment Services program.

 

TheAnnual and Semi-Annual Program Outcomes Reportindicates objectives, terminations and dispositions for each GIOC program. This quality assurance tool is used to identify problem areas and plan appropriate corrective action as warranted.

 

3.     Individual

Program staff works in partnership with each program participant to develop an Individualized Employment Plan (IEP). The IEP represents a collaboratively-developed plan between the program and the participant establishing short-term and long-term employment goals. Goals and objectives are entered in GIOC’s VERTEX information system which produces aggregate data to track program participants’ progress, for decision support and for reporting. 

Examples of Program Success 

Year over year Goodwill has seen an increase in its number of people it serves. From 2008 to 2012 Goodwill increased the number of people served by 2,783 or 34%. The number of people placed increased, even during difficult economic times, by 143%. Everyday Goodwill provides employment to an average of 1,000 persons with significant barriers.

Meet Shari

Goodwill provides comprehensive and individualized support to people like Shari. Shari was in a domestic violence situation and had to flee her home. When she left, she left with very little money and few of her belongings. This turn of events caused a previously self-sufficient woman with a college degree to become homeless. Finding respite, in a homeless shelter, Shari slept outside because there was not enough room in the home. Each day was a struggle. Shari was forced to learn the survival skills necessary to live on the streets.

Shari refused to give up, she knew she had the necessary drive to help herself. She ate her meals at soup kitchens but she also volunteered in them as a way to give back. She continued trying to find work, which is not an easy feat when you don’t have a permanent address, current employment, or even easy access to computers. Despite these obstacles, Shari did not give up. One day she walked into the Goodwill Career Center.

Shari met with a Goodwill staff who determined that someone with her skills could be an asset at the Goodwill. Shari became a client at Goodwill, for six hours a day she received employment training at the Career Center. Goodwill saw potential in Shari and we provided her with individualized support designed and customized just for her. When a position became available at Goodwill, Shari was hired as an employee. Shari now works at Goodwill as an Employment Services Coordinator. In theshort time Shari has been officially employed by Goodwill, the program she coordinates has helped 275 people plus their families.


Education and Job Training

Goodwill provides a wide range of training services to help a person facing barriers get and keep a job. Goodwill’s newest initiative is interactive online courses to increase the number of individuals served and make a tremendous impact in the community. With over an estimated 100,000 plus people in our community with disabilities and other barriers, this program offers another service to assist people in need.

Goodwill uses a variety of methodologies to educate and train persons wanting a job and a pathway to independence.  Goodwill offers an assortment of internal vocational training courses leading to a certificate.  Goodwill also collaborates with a number of public and private schools and colleges to extend the vocational training options.  a portion of the training is also focused on the skills needed to find and maintain employment. 

 In addition Goodwill offers an e-learning program in which the curriculum is a highly interactive online training that appeals to adult learners in several ways. The program participants are exposed to a large data base of over 430 online courses that will assist them in expanding the skills that they need to be successful in their "Ideal" area of employment. 

 In addition to the on-line learning, each individual enrolled in Goodwill's program has access to all other training resources provided at Goodwill i.e. on-the-job training for a variety of occupational skills.

Budget  $500,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Vocational Guidance
Population Served Adults People/Families with of People with Disabilities Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program Short-Term Success 

1. Provide e-learning to 500 program participants.

2. Increase total number of program participants completing e-learning classes.

3. Expand total number of community-based agencies partnering with Goodwill to make e-learning available.

Program Long-Term Success 

1. Buildingawarenessof their financial situation.

2. Providingeducationfor establishing financial goals.

3. Empowering people to change theirbehaviorand achieve their goals through informed choices in financial planning process.
Program Success Monitored By 

 At GIOC, customer satisfaction and accountability are two of its key values. Therein three levels of evaluation and Quality Control exist: 1) agency, 2) program, and 3) individual program participant.

Goodwill utilizes several methods to ensure goals and quality standards are met or exceeded and that improvements are made in such areas as response time, cycle time, internal processes, prevention of quality infractions and more. 

 1.     Agency
 
GIOC utilizes the “Balanced Score Card” (BSC) performance management tool which is designed to create and maintain a culture of performance through managing metrics, scorecards (BSC), dashboards, initiatives, and plans. It aligns business functions to strategy and assists with effectively communicating the strategy. It also helps us identify problem areas and the root causes. In the near future the BSC tool will help in forecasting, trends, year to date data, etc.
 
2.     Program

The weekly GIOC Education, Training and Employment Services Service Summary Report indicates the numbers of clients served and the number of job placements versus service goals.

 GIOC’s Client Tracking Report indicates the number of clients served in each Education, Training and Employment Services program.

 The Annual and Semi-Annual Program Outcomes Report indicates objectives, terminations and dispositions for each GIOC program. This quality assurance tool is used to identify problem areas and plan appropriate corrective action as warranted.

 3.     Individual

Program staff works in partnership with each program participant to develop an Individualized Employment Plan (IEP). The IEP represents a collaboratively-developed plan between the program and the participant establishing short-term and long-term employment goals. Goals and objectives are entered in GIOC’s VERTEX information system which produces aggregate data to track program participants’ progress, for decision support and for reporting.

Examples of Program Success 
In 2012, an individual who is deaf was committed to earning a CompTIA A+ Certification. Through Goodwill’s e-Learning Portal, he was able to complete the CompTIA A+ Essentials and Practical Application and prepare himself for the CompTIA A+ Essentials and Practical Application exams. We are happy to share that he has passed his exam and now holds his CompTIA A+ certification.   

Assistive Technology Services

In 1996, Goodwill established the Rogers A. Severson Fitness and Technology Center- one of the first centers of its kind - which today is a pioneer in the field of providing people with disabilities access to assistive technologies and the chance to achieve their highest levels of independence. Assistive technology (AT) is any equipment or strategy that is used to increase, maintain or improve functional capabilities for persons with disabilities at home, school or work. Assistive technology (AT) is an item of equipment or device used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities for individuals at home, school, or work. It includes communication devices that facilitate speaking; hardware and software technologies that help people use the computer, read, learn and remember; as well as a range of electronic aids and ergonomic devices to help people function in their homes and at work. These tools have allowed patients to better communicate with their doctors, improve self-care to control a disease and advocate for themselves.

ATEC serves adults and children, pre-Kindergarten through adolescents, who have some of the most severe disabilities including spinal cord injuries, autism, cognitive impairments, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, brain injuries, visual impairment, hearing impairment, muscular dystrophy and other developmental and physical impairments and disabilities.

 ATEC is the only program of its kind in Orange County (and only one of a few in California) that provides access to specialized services in which individuals can increase, maintain, or improve communication and functional capabilities through the use of technology. ATEC has specialized, clinical staff and over 1,000 assistive technology devices.

Budget  $1,000,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adults People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

1. Increase independence for 85% of program participants served.

2. Provide assistive technology services to 600 children and adults with severe disabilities .

3. Reuse or repurpose 30 pieces of assistive technology.

4. Host 11 free assistive technology labs for the community.

5. Conduct 50 community assistive technology education and awareness events.

Program Long-Term Success 

1. Expand assistive technology services for children under the age of five.

2. Expand assistive technology services for adults.

3. Develop an augmentative and alternative communication summer camp for children.

4. Develop assistive technology development classes (such as; iDevices, iApps, other topics, etc.) for professional and other interested parties.

Program Success Monitored By 
 At GIOC, customer satisfaction and accountability are two of its key values. Therein three levels of evaluation and Quality Control exist: 1) agency, 2) program, and 3) individual program participant.

 

Goodwill utilizes several methods to ensure goals and quality standards are met or exceeded and that improvements are made in such areas as response time, cycle time, internal processes, prevention of quality infractions and more. 

 
1.     Agency
 

GIOC utilizes the “Balanced Score Card” (BSC) performance management tool which is designed to create and maintain a culture of performance through managing metrics, scorecards (BSC), dashboards, initiatives, and plans. It aligns business functions to strategy and assists with effectively communicating the strategy. It also helps us identify problem areas and the root causes. In the near future the BSC tool will help in forecasting, trends, year to date data, etc.

 
2.     Program

The weekly GIOC Education, Training and Employment Services Service Summary Report indicates the numbers of clients served and the number of job placements versus service goals.

 

GIOC’s Client Tracking Report indicates the number of clients served in each Education, Training and Employment Services program.

 

The Annual and Semi-Annual Program Outcomes Report indicates objectives, terminations and dispositions for each GIOC program. This quality assurance tool is used to identify problem areas and plan appropriate corrective action as warranted.

 3.     Individual

Program staff works in partnership with each program participant to develop an Individualized Employment Plan (IEP). The IEP represents a collaboratively-developed plan between the program and the participant establishing short-term and long-term employment goals. Goals and objectives are entered in GIOC’s VERTEX information system which produces aggregate data to track program participants’ progress, for decision support and for reporting.

Examples of Program Success 

Before the advent of assistive technology, many persons with severe disabilities were trapped in their bodies unable to communicate their basic needs, hopes or dreams. It is estimated that 90% of all behavioral problems in children develop as a result of that inability. Early intervention is crucial to the personal and educational success and ATEC's impact has increased along with the earlier diagnoses of developmental disabilities such as autism and cerebral palsy. This has led to innovations and advances in the field of assistive technology as the earlier a child can be fitted with a piece of assistive technology, the greater their chances of achieving independence later in life.


Rogers A Severson Fitness and Technology Center


Since its opening in 2008, the Rogers A. Severson Fitness and Technology Center has grown and served more than 1000 members in a wide range of cardiovascular, strength training, and flexibility programs. Participating members may have one of the following physical disabilities or chronic illnesses: spinal cord injury, stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, Diabetes, high cholesterol, joint replacements, obesity, asthma, or epilepsy. Locating an affordable fitness center with accessible fitness equipment, is challenging and can be discouraging when trying to take part in a comprehensive fitness program. Goodwill has provided the first step in overcoming this barrier and encouraging those with physical disabilities or chronic illnesses to exercise and achieve a healthy lifestyle.

The Rogers A. Severson Fitness and Technology Center not only impacts the physical well-being of its members but also their emotional and social well-being. Members find that the center promotes emotional and social connections to other people, which can improve one's overall outlook on life. The center creates many of the benefits of fitness and rehabilitation which are provided in a specialized setting that supports the needs of people with disabilities. 

Specialized classes offered to members include balance, strength and conditioning, yoga, and wheelchair skills classes.


Budget  $1,000,000.00
Category  Health Care, General/Other Rehabilitation Services
Population Served Adults People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities People/Families of People with Health Conditions
Program Short-Term Success 
 1. Support a healthy life style for members by retaining 57% of prior year’s members.

2.  Promote better health and wellness by sustaining 1,500 member visits per month.

3.  Increase community health and wellness by enrolling 90 new members.

4.  Maintain member’s health and wellness by enrolling a total of 400 members.

5.  Host 40 wellness events to education the community about health and wellness benefits.

Program Long-Term Success 

The Rogers A. Severson Fitness and Technology Centers long term goal is to improve the quality of life and health of some of the most marginalized members of the community. Many people come to the Center in need of education regarding their disabilities or chronic illnesses beyond what they have been given from the medical community. Although the primary focus of the center is to provide exercise instruction and programming, the center has disability related resources to offer those people as they work to optimize their health and functionality. It is common that members with similar disabilities will often mentor and educate each other through their daily and weekly interactions at the center.

Program Success Monitored By 
 At GIOC, customer satisfaction and accountability are two of its key values. Therein three levels of evaluation and Quality Control exist: 1) agency, 2) program, and 3) individual program participant.

 

Goodwill utilizes several methods to ensure goals and quality standards are met or exceeded and that improvements are made in such areas as response time, cycle time, internal processes, prevention of quality infractions and more. 

 
1.     Agency
 

GIOC utilizes the “Balanced Score Card” (BSC) performance management tool which is designed to create and maintain a culture of performance through managing metrics, scorecards (BSC), dashboards, initiatives, and plans. It aligns business functions to strategy and assists with effectively communicating the strategy. It also helps us identify problem areas and the root causes. In the near future the BSC tool will help in forecasting, trends, year to date data, etc.

 
2.     Program

The weekly GIOC Education, Training and Employment Services Service Summary Report indicates the numbers of clients served and the number of job placements versus service goals.

 

GIOC’s Client Tracking Report indicates the number of clients served in each Education, Training and Employment Services program.

 

The Annual and Semi-Annual Program Outcomes Report indicates objectives, terminations and dispositions for each GIOC program. This quality assurance tool is used to identify problem areas and plan appropriate corrective action as warranted.

 
3.     Individual

Program staff works in partnership with each program participant to develop an Individualized Employment Plan (IEP). The IEP represents a collaboratively-developed plan between the program and the participant establishing short-term and long-term employment goals. Goals and objectives are entered in GIOC’s VERTEX information system which produces aggregate data to track program participants’ progress, for decision support and for reporting.

Examples of Program Success 

The Rogers A. Severson Fitness and Technology Center not only impacts the physical well-being of our members - but also their emotional and social well-being. The center stimulates their emotional and social connections to other people, which give them greater purpose for living, increased sense of control, and improved overall outlook on life. People with these increased health and psychological benefits work harder at their jobs and maintain greater control of their physical well-being and fitness. The many benefits of fitness and exercise -- provided in a specialized setting that supports the needs of people with disabilities -- translates into improved health outcomes which ultimately lower insurance claims and the use of limited medical resources.


Tierney Centers for Veteran Services

The Tierney Center for Veteran Services’ (Tierney Center) overall goal is to become the leader and centralized provider of veteran resources and employment services in Orange County. The Tierney Center is achieving this through creating strategic partnerships with government/local entities, educational institutions, local businesses/employers, and other community-based organizations. The strength of the Tierney Center program model is the leveraged resources within Goodwill of Orange County's vast network of employers and community partners.

The Tierney Center focuses on 5 key goals:

1. Outreaching, peer navigating, and referring to resources;

2. Placing veterans that were un- and underemployed into careers;

3. Identifying veterans and collecting and circulating program data;

4. Increasing community integration, collaboration, and leadership;

5. Providing funds to partner organizations through sub-grants and emergency funds

Budget  $500,000.00
Category  Employment, General/Other Vocational Rehabilitation
Population Served Adults Males Females
Program Short-Term Success 
  1. Provide needed workforce development, wellness, and financial guidance to 150 veterans.
  2. Create linkages with other local community-based agencies serving veterans to maximize the community’s available resources i.e. education, counseling, housing etc. for veterans.
  3. Establish relationships with the majority of government and government related military service organizations looking to support military personnel upon separation from the service.
Program Long-Term Success 

1. Build capacity to serve veterans through maximizing community partnerships.

2. Create greater levels of awareness and knowledge of the needs of veterans among community partners.

3. Help other community-based agencies locally, regionally, and nationally to increase their capacity to serve America’s veterans.

Program Success Monitored By 
 At GIOC, customer satisfaction and accountability are two of its key values. Therein three levels of evaluation and Quality Control exist: 1) agency, 2) program, and 3) individual program participant.

 

Goodwill utilizes several methods to ensure goals and quality standards are met or exceeded and that improvements are made in such areas as response time, cycle time, internal processes, prevention of quality infractions and more. 

 
1.     Agency
 

GIOC utilizes the “Balanced Score Card” (BSC) performance management tool which is designed to create and maintain a culture of performance through managing metrics, scorecards (BSC), dashboards, initiatives, and plans. It aligns business functions to strategy and assists with effectively communicating the strategy. It also helps us identify problem areas and the root causes. In the near future the BSC tool will help in forecasting, trends, year to date data, etc.

 
2.     Program

The weekly GIOC Education, Training and Employment Services Service Summary Report indicates the numbers of clients served and the number of job placements versus service goals.

GIOC’s Client Tracking Report indicates the number of clients served in each Education, Training and Employment Services program.

The Annual and Semi-Annual Program Outcomes Report indicates objectives, terminations and dispositions for each GIOC program. This quality assurance tool is used to identify problem areas and plan appropriate corrective action as warranted.

 3.     Individual

Program staff works in partnership with each program participant to develop an Individualized Employment Plan (IEP). The IEP represents a collaboratively-developed plan between the program and the participant establishing short-term and long-term employment goals. Goals and objectives are entered in GIOC’s VERTEX information system which produces aggregate data to track program participants’ progress, for decision support and for reporting.

Examples of Program Success 

This program was recently started hence historical data isn’t available yet but it is generally accepted that targeted intervention of workforce development services and supportive services is the key to veterans reentry into society.


Management


CEO/Executive Director Mr. Frank Talarico Jr.
CEO Term Start Feb 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Frank Talarico, Jr. is the President & Chief Executive Officer for Goodwill of Orange County. The nonprofit organization provides education, training, and employment services to people with disabilities and other barriers to employment in order to enter the workforce, upgrade their job skills, or improve their quality of life.

Talarico’s career has been focused primarily in forging strategic partnerships and fundraising. He is known for his business acumen both in the private sector and by nonprofit organizations, for his fund development skills, and for his expertise in strategic planning.

Prior to joining Goodwill, Talarico served as a the CEO of JSerra, a private Catholic school in San Juan Capistrano, where he was responsible for rapid expansion, an improved brand image, and debt reduction. Preceding this engagement, he was Vice President of Institutional Advancement for Servite High School after successfully developing a regional Foundation for the PGA of America. Talarico also served as a consultant to the NFL Players Association, The California Interscholastic Federation, The State of California’s Governor’s Office and the Departments of Labor and Education.

Talarico received his undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley and a Master’s Degree in Applied Communications from California State University, Fullerton. He is an active member of several community organizational boards and in 2010 Talarico was recognized as one of OC Metro Magazine’s “Forty Under Forty” honoring young professionals.

A long-time resident of Orange County, Talarico lives in San Juan Capistrano with his wife Alaina and their four children

 

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mr. Dan Rogers July 2001 Feb 2012
George Kessinger Feb 1977 June 2001

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
Orange County Business Council 2013
United Way Member Agency 2013
National Industries for Severely Handicapped 2000

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation 2015

Collaborations

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 1,023
Number of Part Time Staff 363
Number of Volunteers 517
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % 58%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 59
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 150
Caucasian: 258
Hispanic/Latino: 877
Native American/American Indian: 5
Other: 37
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 793
Male: 593
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

Education

Environment and Conservation

Health Care

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Governance


Board Chair Dick Trueblood
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired Business Executive
Board Chair Term Jan 2017 - Dec 2018
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term Jan - Dec

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Jody A. Hudson First American Trust --
Jacqueline Akerblom Grant Thornton LLP --
Cheryl L. Barrett Ferruzzo & Ferruzzo, LLP Voting
Sharon Bishop TJX Corporation Voting
Robert Briggs Investment Properties Group Voting
James Conner Talley & Company, Inc. Voting
Steven Coyne Coyne Development Corporation Voting
Laura Dang Union Bank Voting
Scott Giacobello Allergan, Inc. Voting
Jacob Gonzales Weintraub Tobin --
K. Brian Horton California United Bank --
Kevin Jones Costco Wholesale --
John Kearney U.S. Bank Voting
Bob Kurkjian Bob Hope USO --
Kerry Michael Finn Halbert Hargrove Voting
Wayne R. Gross -- --
Erin S. Fukuto -- --
David Seidner Cardinal Development --
Frank Talarico Jr. Goodwill Industries of Orange County Voting
Dick Trueblood Del Mar Industries, Inc. Voting
Michael Valentine RiverRock Real Estate Group Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 2
Caucasian: 18
Hispanic/Latino: 2
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 6
Male: 17
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

--

Standing Committees

  • Advisory Board / Advisory Council
  • Audit
  • Audit, Compliance and Controls
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Investment

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Revenue $92,516,237.00
Projected Expenses $89,932,029.00
Form 990s

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 Combined Audit Report

2015 Combined Audit Report

2014 Combined Audit Report

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Revenue $78,038,527 $76,333,355 $73,253,961
Total Expenses $77,862,771 $76,027,210 $71,155,194

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$3,833,331 $37,123,823 $37,794,381
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- $0 $0
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support $10,675 $1,875 $1,995
Earned Revenue $40,802,841 $22,786,346 $20,671,090
Investment Income, Net of Losses $57,944 $362,984 $420,280
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events $374,864 $389,613 $326,775
Revenue In-Kind $32,952,178 $34,888,355 $35,188,113
Other $6,694 $16,074,143 $13,989,274

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Program Expense $69,409,499 $67,249,353 $62,680,001
Administration Expense $7,434,142 $7,638,088 $7,230,682
Fundraising Expense $1,019,130 $1,139,769 $1,244,511
Payments to Affiliates -- $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.00 1.00 1.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses 89% 88% 88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 24% 3% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Total Assets $48,807,828 $46,563,515 $48,125,432
Current Assets $11,575,515 $9,388,758 $8,646,291
Long-Term Liabilities $2,792,018 $369,879 $444,427
Current Liabilities $12,910,562 $14,186,524 $15,233,933
Total Net Assets $33,105,248 $32,007,112 $32,447,072

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 0.90 0.66 0.57

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 6% 1% 1%
Endowment Value $52,981.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage(If selected) 5%
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.