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OC Gateway to Housing

 17972 Sky Park Circle, Building 47, Suite E
 Irvine, CA 92614
[P] (949) 631-7213 x 404
[F] (949) 631-7648
www.ocgatewaytohousing.org
[email protected]
Laura Miller
FOUNDED: 1981
INCORPORATED: 1985
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA OC Gateway to Housing
Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter
Former Names Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter (2015)
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Employer Identification Number 95-3613254 00000

Summary


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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of OC Gateway to Housing is to change the lives of homeless families by providing them with encouragement and the tools for achieving self-sufficiency.

Mission Statement

The mission of OC Gateway to Housing is to change the lives of homeless families by providing them with encouragement and the tools for achieving self-sufficiency.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2017
Projected Expenses $708,000.00
Projected Revenue $708,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Transitional Housing Program
  • Rapid Re-Housing: Permanent Housing

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

The mission of OC Gateway to Housing is to change the lives of homeless families by providing them with encouragement and the tools for achieving self-sufficiency.

Background Statement

Since its founding in1981 as Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter, OC Gateway has been a leader in providing housing, services and advocacy to Orange County’s homeless families. Beginning as an emergency shelter, OC Gateway evolved into a multifaceted housing program filling significant gaps in service for homeless families—a majority of them single mothers and their children. In 2014-15, OC Gateway transformed its programs to increase families’ self-sufficiency. The organization had been providing a transitional-housing shelter and scattered-site transitional apartments. In late 2014, OC Gateway sold its Wallace Avenue shelter building in Costa Mesa and began purchasing more transitional-housing units to strengthen our scattered-site transitional program. In early 2015, OC Gateway launched a rapid-rehousing program to quickly place families in permanent housing. In September 2015, the organization received state approval to change its name to OC Gateway to Housing; the name change on our IRS letter is pending.

OC Gateway provides transitional housing and rapid rehousing. Transitional housing places families in our safe condos and increase their self-sufficiency by building skills and gradually lessening supports. Rapid rehousing places families in their own apartments with subsidies and supportive services.

Impact Statement

Accomplishments

Last year, 78% of families remained in or exited to permanent housing.

87% of adults maintained or increased their total income. This percentage was one of the three highest out of 20 Orange County agencies serving homeless families.

80% of families accomplished two or more goals in their case plan by the time they completed the program.

100% of families received services from community organizations, which builds self-sufficiency and decreases overreliance on our housing programs.

100% of children moved from the In Crisis well-being level to Stable.

Goals

Permanent Housing: a) 100% of homeless families that enter our rapid rehousing program will acquire permanent housing within 60 days. b) 75% of families will remain in permanent housing at year’s end or will exit to permanent housing (subsidized or unsubsidized).

Income: 83% of adults will maintain or increase their total income (from all sources) as of the end of the operating year or program exit.

Greater Self-sufficiency: a) 50% of families will accomplish no less than two goals in their case plan prior to successfully completing the program. b) 60% of families will receive services they need from community-services organizations.

Child Well-being: 70% or more of children in OC Gateway housing programs will move from well-being levels of In Crisis to Stable and 30% will move from In Crisis to Thriving.


Needs Statement

1) Media marketing of our programs and our accomplishments.

2) Diversification of our financial portfolio in order to survive any federal reductions of grants from HUD.

3) Baby supplies and household supplies for our families.

4) On-call volunteers to cover the front office when the staff or other volunteers can not come in for that day.

5) Board members with knowledge in fundraising, real estate, event planning and finances.


CEO Statement

OC Gateway fills crucial gaps in care. We accept single mothers, single fathers and couples, both married and unmarried, and children of all ages. A number of transitional family programs in Orange County will not accept children above age 10, male adolescents, single fathers or unmarried couples. We keep families together—with both parents and all their children. Also, we accept parents and children with chronic mental illness, as well as children with autism or behavioral issues. Many housing programs are not equipped or willing to accept families with these challenges. In addition, OC Gateway will admit a parent who is on probation or parole after a nonviolent crime. Few housing programs will take these families because it is harder for the parent with a criminal past to find a job.

Also, OC Gateway programs assist many abused children, who enter our programs with their families. Roughly 20% of children enter OC Gateway directly from domestic violence shelters, and 100% of those children have been physically, sexually or emotionally abused by the perpetrator. An additional 30% of children come from a history of domestic violence in the two to seven years prior to entry into OC Gateway. Also, another 2% have been in foster care for one or more years because of domestic violence in their homes and have been reunited with their nonabusing parent—generally their mothers—before entering our program, sometimes within a few months.

The average homeless family that enters OC Gateway is a single mother with three children. Her income for a family of four from the CalWorks program is a monthly payment of $852, or $10,224 per year. Of the single women with children who come to OC Gateway, 80% have a high school diploma or less. About 40% of the single-female heads of household who enter the program are working; they earn minimum wage, work part-time, and have no benefits.


Board Chair Statement

OC Gateway is a financially stable organization with good leadership and a committed board of directors. Since June 2014, OC Gateway has had an annual renewable grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for the Rapid Rehousing Program of $291,789 in 2016-17 and in 2017-18. To support rapid rehousing and our transitional program, OC Gateway receives donations from individuals, special events and philanthropic organizations. From 2012-13 to 2016-17, OC Gateway received generous bequests totaling $1.075 million, which increased our sustainability. Bequest funds and proceeds from the sale of our shelter building are being invested in our programs. These funds are being used to purchase additional transitional units for families and are assisting OC Gateway in the transition to our new combination of rapid rehousing and scattered-site transitional housing.

OC Gateway collaborates with agencies in Orange County that also address family homelessness through the Central Entry System, which prioritizes families and sends them to the housing nonprofit best able to meet their needs. With fellow nonprofits in the Central Entry System, OC Gateway is using the proven Housing First model that places families in housing as soon as possible and does not screen families out due to, e.g., unemployment or history of evictions.

Housing First also produces some challenges because a family’s ability to acquire or remain in permanent housing depends on income from employment and willingness of landlords to rent to them. OC Gateway must advocate to landlords for families and work with parents to increase their education or skills to increase income.

Although OC Gateway has a HUD grant for rapid rehousing, there is no guarantee that this grant will continue if federal funding for HUD is cut. Also, OC Gateway receives no federal funding for transitional housing and is dependent on private funding for this crucial program. HUD rules do not permit families to move from transitional housing to rapid rehousing, which limits OC Gateway’s ability to give them the support they need. We are supporting an effort to change this rule.


Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

To donate by credit card, please call our office at 949-631-7213, or you can send a check to17972 Sky Park Circle, Building #47, Suite E, Irvine, CA 92614, to the attention of the Executive Director.

The Donate section of our website includes wish lists of material donations. If you would like to donate items to our programs, please contact us to arrange the donations.

To volunteer, please call 949-631-7213 ext. 500 or email [email protected] The Volunteer section of our website describes opportunities to volunteer in tutoring, furniture pickup and delivery, office support, and leading seminars.
 

Geographic Area Served

Central Orange County
West Orange County
South Orange County
North Orange County
OC Gateway to Housing serves all of Orange County, California

Organization Categories

  1. Housing, Shelter - Housing Support
  2. Human Services -
  3. Human Services - Family Services

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Programs


Transitional Housing Program

Transitional Housing increases families’ self-sufficiency by building skills while they live in units owned by OC Gateway. We own nine condominiums with a total of 48 beds for transitional families. They receive case management, life-skills training, referrals for education or vocational training, mental health therapy, subsidized child care, and transportation assistance. At the end of the 6- to 9-month maximum period, case managers help families find permanent housing. Families agree to save 10% to 30% of their income, find employment, improve life skills, set goals and work with their case managers to learn to budget and rehabilitate their credit.

Budget  $304,260.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Homeless Shelter
Population Served Families Homeless At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 
During the first three months of the program our adults will become gainfully employed either part-time or full-time.
During the first three months of the program our adults will achieve no less than two-goals in their service plan.
During the first week of our program all eligible school-aged children will be registered in school.
During the first week of our program all families will begin to apply for all and any public entitlements that they are qualified for in Orange County.
Program Long-Term Success  75% of transitional housing families will exit to permanent housing (subsidized or unsubsidized). 83% of adults will maintain or increase their total income form all sources as of the end of the operating year or program exit. 50% of families will accomplish no less than two goals in their case plan prior to successful completion of the program. 60% of families will receive services from community-based organizations. 100% of children will move from In Crisis to higher well-being levels of Stable or Thriving. As a result, homeless families will secure and maintain permanent housing, parents will be better able to provide for their children, families will be more self-sufficient and child well-being will be improved.  
Program Success Monitored By 

1) Permanent housing is evaluated through a central database quarterly to assess the number of families that have moved to and remain in permanent housing.

2) Income is evaluated through case notes and weekly case management meetings. Staff assess which residents have full-time and part-time jobs, average number of hours worked per week, wage or salary adjustments, training conducted either on the job or in a vocational program, and total income.

3) Greater self-sufficiency is assessed through case managers’ notes and referral records. Plan goals relate to vocational skills, income, education level, problem-solving skills, etc. Community services include special education, medical and dental services.

4) Child well-being is evaluated using the Family Basic Needs and Family Functioning Factors assessments, which encompass physical, emotional and behavioral well-being. Case managers assess children within five days of intake every 90 days and at exit.

Examples of Program Success 
A single-mother who came from a drug and alcohol rehabilitation program had very little job experience due to her former addictions. She came to OCIS with very few personal possessions and lack of self-esteem.
 
During the first month of being in the program she registered for nursing school to become an LVN.  She completed her nursing degree and passed her LVN exam,  while raising a young child and attending to their needs too.
 
She is now working in a local health facility and gaining experience for her future goal of becoming a Registered Nurse.  She will be getting her own apartment for the first time in 5 years, within the next 5 months.
 
She stated that had she not found our Transitional Housing Program, she may have relapsed, lost her child and possibly her life.

Rapid Re-Housing: Permanent Housing

Rapid Rehousing quickly places families in permanent housing. OC Gateway forms relationships with landlords to initiate leases and resolve any landlord-tenant issues, but a lease is in a family’s name, creating a sense of stability and permanence from the start. OC Gateway provides subsidized rent, utility deposits and moving costs. Also, families receive case management, life-skills training, referrals for education or vocational training, mental health therapy, subsidized child care, and transportation assistance. Parents improve their economic situation so they can pay full rent when they exit the program after a maximum of 18 months.
Budget  $367,238.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Homeless Shelter
Population Served Families Homeless Homeless
Program Short-Term Success 
100% of homeless families that enter rapid rehousing will acquire permanent housing within 60 days. 90% of the families will successfully remain in permanent housing after 3 months.
 
Program Long-Term Success 

75% of families will remain in permanent housing at year’s end 83% of adults will maintain or increase their total income form all sources as of the end of the operating year or program exit. 50% of families will accomplish no less than two goals in their case plan prior to successful completion of the program. 60% of families will receive services from community-based organizations. 100% of children will move from In Crisis to higher well-being levels of Stable or Thriving. As a result, homeless families will secure and maintain permanent housing, parents will be better able to provide for their children, families will be more self-sufficient and child well-being will be improved.

Program Success Monitored By 

1) Permanent housing is evaluated through a central database quarterly to assess the number of families that have moved to and remain in permanent housing.

2) Income is evaluated through case notes and weekly case management meetings. Staff assess which residents have full-time and part-time jobs, average number of hours worked per week, wage or salary adjustments, training conducted either on the job or in a vocational program, and total income.

3) Greater self-sufficiency is assessed through case managers’ notes and referral records. Plan goals relate to vocational skills, income, education level, problem-solving skills, etc. Community services include special education, medical and dental services.

4) Child well-being is evaluated using the Family Basic Needs and Family Functioning Factors assessments, which encompass physical, emotional and behavioral well-being. Case managers assess children within five days of intake every 90 days and at exit.

Examples of Program Success 

Rodney, a single-father entered our Rapid Rehousing Program in 2016 with his daughter, Chelsea, who was 16 years old at the time. Rodney was struggling with an illness and had to have treatments throughout his six-month stay in our RRH Program. Despite his treatments, he still held his job and raised his teenage daughter to the best of his abilities.

Six months later, Rodney and his daughter are still in the apartment and paying the rent on their own without our supportive services. The most recent good news is that Chelsea is graduating high school in June. She has also been accepted by a university and will be starting her freshman year in September 2017. Rodney has done a great job as a single father! Rodney said that without OC Gateway’s support, he and his daughter would still be living in their car, and their lives would have turned out much differently.


Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Laura Miller
CEO Term Start Oct 2006
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Executive Director Laura Miller has primary responsibility for oversight of the agency. She has been executive director for 10 years, starting in October 2006. Laura has led the organization through transformations that refocused OC Gateway programs on long-term housing solutions and building clients’ capacity to tap into community resources. Prior to OC Gateway, she was the executive director of Rio Hondo Temporary Home in Norwalk for more than seven years, following one year as RHTH’s program director. Laura has a master’s degree in social work and is a licensed clinical social worker. She has been responsible for program design, management and supervision of clinicians and program staff working with the homeless for more than 30 years.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

OC Gateway collaborates with many local nonprofits and government agencies. With other homeless-serving nonprofits and Orange County, OC Gateway collaborates in the Central Entry System, which centralizes referrals of homeless families to housing programs in the county. As a member of the rapid rehousing collaborative run by Pathways of Hope, OC Gateway is committed to filling rapid rehousing apartments. Also, OC Gateway collaborates with employment assistance agencies, local childcare centers, domestic violence groups, emergency and transitional shelters, child protective services, public assistance agencies, public and private schools, local law enforcement, mental health clinics, community health clinics, substance abuse programs, food banks and feeding programs, public law centers, tutoring agencies, and children’s summer programs.

Also, OC Gateway participates in a monthly Homeless Providers Collaborative with 35 other member organizations, including supportive services agencies, healthcare providers, public agencies, and advocates for the homeless. The forum’s goal is to improve the region’s housing programs and supportive services for the homeless, including development of new emergency, transitional, interim and permanent beds, and the facilitation of partnerships.

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 30
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 100%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: --
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 1
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 1
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

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CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Mr. Mark Franzen
Board Chair Company Affiliation Business owner
Board Chair Term July 2013 - July 2017
Board Co-Chair Ms. Ellie Palk
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation OC Superior Court
Board Co-Chair Term July 2016 - July 2019

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Judy Cooper Media & marketing business owner Voting
Ms. Gale Edelberg consultant and teacher of dance theatre Voting
Mr. Mark Franzen Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Jacqueline Ingels Community Volunteer Voting
Ms. Lois Jacobs Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Voting
Ms. Carole Kamper retired Voting
Ms. Gerri Kraft Environmental management consultant Voting
Ms. Ellie Palk Orange County Superior Court Voting
Ms. Barbara Sloate Event planner business owner Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 9
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 1
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 70%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 30%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

  • Board Governance
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Operations
  • Program / Program Planning

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2016 to June 30, 2017
Projected Revenue $708,000.00
Projected Expenses $708,000.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

Audit Documents

2016 OCGH audit

2015 Audited financials

2014 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $377,334 $627,272 $2,257,920
Total Expenses $502,470 $495,898 $685,588

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$118,487 $283,350 $416,732
Government Contributions $160,464 $162,344 $125,346
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $160,464 $162,344 $125,346
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- $0
Earned Revenue $23,448 $35,121 $51,207
Investment Income, Net of Losses $46,737 $121,568 $78,583
Membership Dues -- -- $0
Special Events $28,198 $24,889 $27,407
Revenue In-Kind -- -- $0
Other -- -- $-27,407

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $466,968 $441,349 $625,438
Administration Expense $15,930 $34,713 $38,899
Fundraising Expense $19,572 $19,836 $21,251
Payments to Affiliates -- -- $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.75 1.26 3.29
Program Expense/Total Expenses 93% 89% 91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 6% 4% 4%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $3,206,229 $3,265,296 $3,224,414
Current Assets $100,304 $170,848 $150,821
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- $5,584
Current Liabilities $36,077 $25,429 $15,563
Total Net Assets $3,170,152 $3,239,867 $3,203,267

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.78 6.72 9.69

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.