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Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation

 17932 Sky Park Circle, Suite E
 Irvine, CA 92614
[P] (949) 859-6312
[F] (949) 859-6323
https://pcrf-kids.org/
[email protected]
Jeri Wilson
FOUNDED: 1982
INCORPORATED: 1982
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA Reaching for the Cure
NVRQT
Dribble for the Cure
Dream Discover Cure
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 95-3772528 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

Founded in 1982 by physicians, parents and community leaders, Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation (PCRF) has raised over $44 Million for cancer research since its inception. This represents the persistent hard work of physicians, researchers, volunteers, staff and community partners who are dedicated to the health of our future generation—our children. Our mission has stayed true over the course of time: to improve the care, quality of life and survival rates of children with malignant diseases. Over the last 38 years, we have seen drastic improvements – survival rates for childhood cancer have risen from 10% to almost 80%. Because of research, the cancer death rate has dropped more dramatically for children than for any other age group. However, there are still childhood cancers that have not had the same results – rare and aggressive cancers continue to devastate families and rob children of their childhoods.

Mission Statement

Founded in 1982 by physicians, parents and community leaders, Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation (PCRF) has raised over $44 Million for cancer research since its inception. This represents the persistent hard work of physicians, researchers, volunteers, staff and community partners who are dedicated to the health of our future generation—our children. Our mission has stayed true over the course of time: to improve the care, quality of life and survival rates of children with malignant diseases. Over the last 38 years, we have seen drastic improvements – survival rates for childhood cancer have risen from 10% to almost 80%. Because of research, the cancer death rate has dropped more dramatically for children than for any other age group. However, there are still childhood cancers that have not had the same results – rare and aggressive cancers continue to devastate families and rob children of their childhoods.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $3,107,500.00
Projected Revenue $3,200,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • PCRF Laboratory Research Program at the Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital (MFCH) at New York Medical College (NYMC)
  • Basic Science Research at Seattle Children's Hospital
  • Pediatric Cancer Translational Research Program at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA
  • Translational Research Program at Stanford University
  • Translational Grant Program at Dana Farber Cancer Institute

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

Founded in 1982 by physicians, parents and community leaders, Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation (PCRF) has raised over $44 Million for cancer research since its inception. This represents the persistent hard work of physicians, researchers, volunteers, staff and community partners who are dedicated to the health of our future generation—our children. Our mission has stayed true over the course of time: to improve the care, quality of life and survival rates of children with malignant diseases. Over the last 38 years, we have seen drastic improvements – survival rates for childhood cancer have risen from 10% to almost 80%. Because of research, the cancer death rate has dropped more dramatically for children than for any other age group. However, there are still childhood cancers that have not had the same results – rare and aggressive cancers continue to devastate families and rob children of their childhoods.

Background Statement

Since it's establishment in 1982, PCRF has focused its efforts to improve the care, quality of life and survival rate of children with malignant diseases.  The founders of PCRF joined forces to support laboratory research that would translate into immediate treatment for children with cancer.  Over the past 38 years, the staff and dedicated volunteers of PCRF has raised over $44 million for pediatric cancer research across the United States.  Research results are reported worldwide through major medical journals and at professional conferences.  Information on successful, state-of-the-art treatments are made available through the research investigators funded by PCRF, in presentations of their findings at both national and international scientific meetings any many scientific publications.  PCRF is an independent, nonprofit organization governed by a volunteer 20 member Board of Directors comprised of community and business leaders and parents of oncology patients.  PCRF is privately supported by donations from individuals, charitable foundations and corporations through special events throughout the year and by PCRF product sales.  A dedicated group of volunteers donate their time and talents to ensure that 81% of funds raised go directly into research.

Impact Statement

 Throughout our history of supporting pediatric cancers, we have maintained a stable foundation financially. This year we attained a Platinum rating from GuideStar. What this means for our donors is that you can have confidence in PCRF’s ability to fund the best researchers in the world, with the utmost attention to financial efficacy and transparency.


 


Needs Statement

Because childhood cancers still exist, PCRF presses on, funding experienced researchers as well as emerging researchers to continue the necessary work of finding cures and improvements to care. Your partnership with PCRF powers this gift of Hope. Hope for a cure, hope for less aggressive treatments that attack cancer cells but leave the healthy cells, hope for long-term quality of life through safer therapies to fight cancer. Hope for new research, new protocols, new interventions.

1. Donate and Contribute to a Cure
2. Participate in an Event
3. Understand the Research
4. Join the Organization
5. Share our Mission with your clients, customers, friends and family.
We solely exist to raise money for research.

Help build PCRF’s funding pool to $5.1 million annually. This will allow PCRF to initiate research consortiums, while positioning ourselves as a pioneering thinker whose innovation continues to move forward the science to transform the lives of children and families battling this disease.

CEO Statement

It is a privilege to work as Executive Director for the Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation.  The enormous passion for the mission of PCRF by the Board of Directors and volunteers of this organization is demonstrated each day by their dedicated hours of volunteerism, without which we could not keep our percentage of overhead so low, thus allowing over 81% of funds raised to go directly to research.  PCRF has consistently raised over $2 million a year with only 5 full-time employees.  This has, and continues to be, accomplished through dedicated volunteers who give of their time and talents.

Board Chair Statement

In these tough economic times deciding where to donate can be a difficult decision. For that reason, we will always be as transparent as possible and exceptional stewards of your contributions. Since our inception, we have raised over $44 million dollars for the fight against pediatric cancer, and over 81 percent of those funds have gone directly to support our research programs in the battle against childhood cancer. To that end we have made tremendous strides over the past 38 years, with the survival rate increasing from approximately 20% to 80% for those diagnosed with pediatric cancer. This past year I had the opportunity to tour our key grantee research facilities and meet directly with the principal investigators at New York Medical College MD Anderson and Children's Hospital Los Angeles and learn first-hand about the progress being made on a daily basis. But sadly, 1 out of 5 children with the disease will not survive their battle. -Past Board President, Keith Koeller

Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

At PCRF there are many ways to get involved and support our families. Donations can be made online, by mail or one of our staff members can accept your gift over the phone. You can designate a specific research institution that is supported by PCRF or make your gift in honor or in memory of someone special. You can even make your donation twice as effective with matching gifts - you can double or even triple your gift! Check with your employer for matching gift status today.Use other creative ways to donate - check out our NVRQT Campaign, participate in an event, or start your own fundraiser or view our 3rd Party Event platform and host your own event to raise funds for research that leads to curing childhood cancers. PCRF knows that a volunteer is the heart and soul of an organization. The passion and gifts that volunteers bring to all PCRF events and activities is what drives community and success.Volunteer needs include:Event Support, Office Support (Especially before and after events)Committee Membership, and many more…We are always looking for partners who wish to donate a professional skill or time that may be helpful in reducing overhead costs. For instance, we often need a medical professional to serve as first aid at our large events.To find out more Ways to Give visit our website at: http://pcrf-kids.org/contribute-cure

Geographic Area Served

Throughout the United States
We serve the entire United States, where all children may be diagnosed with pediatric cancer.

Organization Categories

  1. Medical Research - Pediatrics Research
  2. Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines - Cancer
  3. Philanthropy,Voluntarism & Grantmaking Foundations - Fund Raising & Fund Distribution

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Programs


PCRF Laboratory Research Program at the Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital (MFCH) at New York Medical College (NYMC)

The PCRF Laboratory Research Program at MFCH at NYMC is focused on five

overarching areas of research/hypotheses. These state of the art research initiatives include: 1) cancer genetics and treatment of childhood and adolescent hematological malignancies; 2) genetically re-engineering immune cells to enhance targeted adoptive cellular cancer immunotherapy; 3) tumor immunology and identifying targets for humoral targeted immunotherapy; 4) stem cell biology, cancer stem cells, and regenerative therapy; and 5) translational therapeutic consortiums for childhood and adolescent cancer therapy.

Budget  255,554
Category  Medical Research, General/Other Cancer Research
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

The overarching objective is to accelerate the accrual of children with cancer and other lethal blood/immune and genetic disorders onto early phase developmental clinical research trials improve biological specimen collection and transmittal and thereby enhance the rapid implantation of novel therapeutic strategies for this subgroup of children.

Program Long-Term Success 

Specifically this research will endeavor to determine the benefits of high dose and/or low toxicity chemotherapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation to provide a platform for additional allogeneic immune cell therapy in leukemia, lymphoma and other lethal diseases. We have specifically selected this critical portion of Dr. Cairo’s research because; i) collaborating institutions include UCLA and Children’s Memorial Hospital of Chicago; ii) and perhaps most importantly, because of its high-risk patients.

Program Success Monitored By 
As of September 2012 over 230 early phase clinical trials have been activated in the PCRF Laboratory with currently 75 active and open clinical trials, 146 manuscripts published that have received at least partial support from PCRF and over 2000 patients entered and accrued on PCRF trials. For our more recent research from 2011, we published 14 peer-reviewed manuscripts and published/presented 33 abstracts similarly related to this research.
Examples of Program Success  --

Basic Science Research at Seattle Children's Hospital

Program title: Development of Tunable ON-OFF CAR T Cells for Safe and Durable Tumor Control

Clinical trials conducted by our Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer Research (BTCCCR) at the Seattle Children's Hospital have reported 94% remission rates in patients with relapsed or refractory leukemia using T cells engineered to recognize and "kill" tumor cells based on specific cell surface proteins. Referred to as chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, this strategy is also being tested against solid tumors (such as brain tumors and neuroblastoma) in ongoing FDA-approved clinical trials at the Seattle Children's Hospital. However, solid tumors pose formidable challenges to CAR T cell therapy - of note is the loss of T cell function inside solid tumors. It is believed that with repetitive attacks against tumors, T cells slowly enter a state of "exhaustion" or dysfunction wherein they shutdown their anti-tumor functions. This state of inaction is reinforced through negative signals from tumor cells, which further suppress their metabolic capacity for mounting an anti-tumor attack.

Budget  $375,000.00
Category  Medical Research, General/Other Cancer Research
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Program Short-Term Success 

We propose a novel "Trojan Horse" strategy for "melting" solid tumors from within using CAR T cells controlled with bioengineered ON-OFF switches. The idea is to first allow CAR T cells to infiltrate solid tumors without undergoing functional exhaustion - this will be achieved by administering CAR T cells in an "OFF state" wherein they do not express CAR, and are hence incapable of recognizing or reacting to tumors. Next, we will activate CAR expression simultaneously in all therapeutic T cells, thus leading to a synchronous anti-tumor attack. The anti-tumor agents released by active CAR T cells are also expected to attract and activate more of the patient's own anti-tumor immune cells, thus leading to immune synergy. We further propose that the rapid and efficacious tumor clearance resulting from this synchronous and synergistic anti-tumor activity will lead to long-term persistence of functionally potent CAR T cells, which may be called upon again in case of future tumor relapse.

Program Long-Term Success 

It is believed that with repetitive attacks against tumors, T cells slowly enter a state of "exhaustion" or dysfunction wherein they shutdown their anti-tumor functions. This state of inaction is reinforced through negative signals from tumor cells, which further suppress their metabolic capacity for mounting an anti-tumor attack.

Program Success Monitored By 

In this proposal we will conduct preclinical testing of all aspects of the "Trojan Horse" strategy - therapeutic efficacy, long-term functional potency and durability of therapeutic T cells, toxicity and immune synergy. With the convenient on-site location of GMP-grade T cell production core at BTCCCR, we envisage seamless and rapid translation into clinical trials in high-risk pediatric patients in collaboration with oncologists at the Seattle Children's in the future.

Examples of Program Success  --

Pediatric Cancer Translational Research Program at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA

The Pediatric Cancer Translational Research Program focuses on four areas of research: 1) Stem cell transplantation and gene therapy for leukemia and lymphoma – Drs. Satiro de Oliveira/Ted Moore/Don Kohn/Gay Crooks, 2) The Pediatric Sarcoma Translational Research Program: Spanning the gap from bench to bedside – Dr. Noah Federman, 3) Dendritic Cell Vaccination for Pediatric High-Grade Glioma Patients – Dr. Tom Davidson, 4) Next generation sequencing and pediatric cancer predisposition – Dr. Vivian Chang. Members of the Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Division are members of COG, PBMTC, SARC, PPNOC, NYMC consortium among others.
Budget  1,000,000
Category  Medical Research, General/Other Cancer Research
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  In the short-term, we hope to build a Leukemia Research program to bring together our investigators in collaboration and attract additional researchers from around the country. In doing this, we plan to develop a better understanding of leukemia and thereby formulate more rational therapies that lack the toxic side effects of current treatments leading to cures and improved quality of life for our young patients.
Program Long-Term Success  Our goals as a Division are to provide comprehensive and multidisciplinary care to patients to all patients. Research in these areas will attempt to provide effective treatments for children with cancer with less toxicity, fewer side effects and longer-term remission of disease, ultimately leading to life-long protection from recurrence and increased quality of life. Advanced testing for genetic predisposition to cancer can result in earlier detection and improved outcomes for the patient.
Program Success Monitored By 
# of new patients
# enrolled in clinical trials
# of publications and abstracts
Funds from PCRF have provided funds to support research among young investigators (Clinical Instructors and Assistant Professors) within the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology to help move their research forward while they await funding through other mechanisms, NIH and other established organizations.
Examples of Program Success  --

Translational Research Program at Stanford University

 Program Title: Targeted Inhibition of CREB for the Treatment of Pediatric Acute Leukemias
 
The overall survival of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is 50% and less than 30% with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). CREB (cAMP Response Element Binding Protein) is a protein that is overproduced in leukemia cells from patients in AML. CREB increases the growth and survival of immature blood cells resulting in AML. In addition, overexpression of the CREB protein in AML patients was associated with an increased risk of relapse and decrease in survival. Knocking down CREB in AML cells resulted in cell death but had no long-term effects on normal blood stem cells. Therefore, we propose that CREB and its downsteam pathways may provide an alternative approach to treat acute leukemia. We developed a small molecule compound that blocks the interaction of CREB and its binding partner CBP (CREB Binding Protein). Our hope is that CREB inhibitors will lead to discovery of a new class of drugs that will be used to treat acute leukemia.
 
Budget  $250,000.00
Category  Medical Research, General/Other Cancer Research
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Infants to Preschool (under age 5) K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  In Year 1, Dr. Sakamoto and her team plan to screen a small molecule library and test candidate compounds (through resynthesis) in vitro and in vivo. In Year 2, they plan to perform SAR to optimize the drug for delivery and test in cell lines and animal models. In Year 3, they plan to license to a company, obtain IND from the FDA, and propose a clinical trial for relapsed leukemia.
Program Long-Term Success  Dr. Sakamoto's goal is to bring new drugs to children with relapsed acute leukemia. One of the drugs being studied is a small moleucule that blocks the action of a protein known as CREB. CREB is over produced in AML cells in patients and this is associated with a worse prognosis. She is making progress in not only understanding how these new drugs work, but also, studying how to best use these drugs in patients. Her hope is to improve the overall survival of children with relapsed leukemia so that they will live healthy and productive lives.
Program Success Monitored By 
Dr. Sakamoto hopes to identify and develop new and potent compounds that inhibit CREB function. The goal is to license promising small molecule inhibitors to existing pharmaceutical or biotech companies in the U.S. 
Examples of Program Success  She is making progress in not only understanding how these new drugs work, but also, studying how to best use these drugs in patients. Her hope is to improve the overall survival of children with relapsed leukemia so that they will live healthy and productive lives.

Translational Grant Program at Dana Farber Cancer Institute

 Program Title: Bridging the gap between target discovery and clinical trials in pediatric Ewing sarcoma
 
Ewing sarcoma is the second most common bone cancer in children. Although cure rates in children with localized disease approach 75%, current treatment combines intensive chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation for which there is an alarming rate of long-term side effects. Furthermore, for patients with disseminated or recurrent disease, current treatment regimens are largely ineffective. Therefore, there is a great need for new and innovative treatments for patients diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma. In recent work, Dr. Crompton has shown that Ewing sarcoma tumor cells express a highly active protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK results in cancer cell death and slows tumor growth in multiple experimental models of Ewing sarcoma. This suggests that FAK inhibition may be a new, targeted approach for treating patients with this disease. With several FAK inhibitors in early-phase clinical trials for adult cancers, this approach could be translatable to patients with Ewing sarcoma in the near future.
 
Budget  $50,000.00
Category  Medical Research, General/Other Cancer Research
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) Infants to Preschool (under age 5) K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  In closely related work, Dr. Crompton has found another class of proteins that are important in Ewing cancer cell adhesion and migration. These proteins may be critical in activating FAK and independently play a role in disease progression and dissemination. The generous support of the Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation will aid in validating these new findings.
Program Long-Term Success  The work currently being supported by the Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation will build on Dr. Crompton’s initial results to further define a role for FAK inhibitors in the treatment of Ewing sarcoma and identify new candidate therapeutic targets for this disease. FAK plays a critical role in cellular migration in normal cells and cancer cells. Migration of cells is necessary for cancer cells to disseminate to other sites in the body and form metastatic tumors. Dr. Crompton’s work suggests that FAK may be necessary for the development of disseminated disease in Ewing sarcoma. Thus, targeting FAK may be a tractable mechanism for preventing spread and metastatic relapse for patients with this disease.
Program Success Monitored By  Recent experience in the field of oncology demonstrates that treating cancers with single-agent targeted therapy is inadequate to cure patients. Therefore, Dr. Crompton has collaborated with the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences to screen a collection of anti-cancer drugs to identify combinations with FAK inhibitors that are synergistic against Ewing sarcoma. The funding from the Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation will allow Dr. Crompton to extensively validate the most synergistic combinations, further refining the potential use of FAK inhibitors for Ewing sarcoma before testing these inhibitors in patients with this devastating disease.
Examples of Program Success  --

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms Jeri B Wilson
CEO Term Start Sept 2011
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

As the Executive Director for the Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation, Jeri brings over 20 years of experience in the field of non-profit management and gift planning. Her extensive fundraising expertise and strategic planning at CHOC Children’s and MemorialCare, helped launch two successful multimillion dollar capital campaigns. After years of volunteering with pediatric oncology families, Ms. Wilson knows firsthand how valuable funding research is to families.

Prior to joining the Memorial Medical Foundation, Ms. Wilson served as Senior Director Trust and Estates at Children’s Hospital Orange County (CHOC), and worked with other notable charitable organizations as Alzheimer’s Association Orange County Chapter, and the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Mrs. Nancy Franks -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Mrs. Erin Arreola Director of Special Events --
Mrs. Christine Farwell Development Associate --
Mrs. Jenny Gehl -- --
Miss Julianne Ludwig Social Media/Marketing Manager --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2018
Charity Navigator 2018

Collaborations

Research Institutions PCRF is currently funding for 2019:

Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 
Beckman Research Institute City of Hope, Duarte, CA
MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA  
New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY
John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA
The Regents of the University of California, San Francisco (Contracts&Grants) San Francisco, CA
 
Other Collaborations:
National Charity League
St. John's University
UCLA Athletics 
Chicago Cubs
Rod Carew

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 1,200
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 1
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 8
Male: 0
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

--

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Elizabeth McNulty
Board Chair Company Affiliation Taylor Anderson, LLP
Board Chair Term Jan 2018 - Dec 2019
Board Co-Chair John Weiner
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation CBRE
Board Co-Chair Term 2017 - 2018

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Jeffrey Akin Ernst & Young LLP --
Thomas Brennan Prudential --
Susie Buchan Community Volunteer --
Tim Cromwell RD Olson Construction --
Cherie Daly Celularity, Inc. --
Scott Ecker Deloitte LLP --
Ralph Fariello Celgene --
Steve Giusto -- --
David Goldwasser The Marissa Fund --
Keith Koeller Koeller, Nebeker, Carlson & Haluck LLP --
Elizabeth McNulty Hewitt Wolensky LLP --
Daniel Mitchell C&W Phys. of Westchester --
Janet Mitchell Community Volunteer --
Cameron Munson -- --
Brad Neglia LBA Realty --
Ed Rosenblum Esq Philanthropist --
Cornel Sneekes -- --
John Vallely Community Volunteer --
Troy Varenchik Deloitte LLP --
John Weiner CB Richard Ellis --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
Emeritus Dr. Geni Bennetts -- --
Emeritus Susan and Richard Bridgford -- --
Emeritus Mrs. Leslie Bubb -- --
Emeritus Mr. Leonard Buchan -- --
Emeritus Mr. Brian Cameron -- --
Emeritus Ms. Melanie Colbert -- --
Emeritus Honorable Corey Cramin -- --
Emeritus Jeff and Bonnie Dankberg -- --
Emeritus Mr. John Deegan -- --
Emeritus Mrs. Barbara Edison -- --
Emeritus Mrs. Jane Fowler -- --
Emeritus Nancy and Mel Franks -- --
Emeritus Mr. Ken Gerdau -- --
Emeritus Mr. Curtis Green -- --
Emeritus Mrs. Dina Haddad -- --
Emeritus Mr. Ray Juels -- --
Emeritus Mr. Mike Latham -- --
Emeritus Mr. Steve Layton -- --
Emeritus Ms. Charlene Lee -- --
Emeritus Mr. Bruce Lehman -- --
Emeritus Mr. Chris Linskey -- --
Emeritus Mrs. Linda MacDonald -- --
Emeritus Mr. Ben McCallister -- --
Emeritus Mr. Craig McCallister -- --
Emeritus Joe and Janet McNeil -- --
Emeritus Mr. Kelly Monahan -- --
Emeritus Mrs. Karen Packer -- --
Emeritus Steve and Shirley Quackenbush -- --
Emeritus Mr. Rob Quish -- --
Emeritus Ms. Susan Reid -- --
Emeritus Mr. Dan Rosen -- --
Emeritus Cary and Michelle Sarnoff -- --
Emeritus Mr. Lou Sauritch -- --
Emeritus Mr. Royce Sharf -- --
Emeritus Mr. Leonard Shulman -- --
Emeritus Mr. Randy Teteak -- --
Emeritus Mrs. Erin Wagner -- --
Emeritus Mrs. Kim Weiner -- --
Emeritus Mr. James Weisenbach -- --
Emeritus Ms. Teri Wielenga -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 16
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel
  • Scientific Advisory

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2019 to Dec 31, 2019
Projected Revenue $3,200,000.00
Projected Expenses $3,107,500.00
Form 990s

2017 990

2016 990

2015 990

2014 990

2013 990

2012 990

Audit Documents

2017 PCRF - Financial Statements - 2017

2016 PCRF Financial Statements - 2016

2015 PCRF Financial Statements - 2015

2014 PCRF Financial Statements - 2014

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $2,919,100 $2,657,544 $2,687,834
Total Expenses $2,492,062 $2,108,445 $2,136,878

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,360,076 $1,352,900 $1,105,704
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- $0
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- $0
Earned Revenue $31,928 -- $313,115
Investment Income, Net of Losses $6,503 $50 $22
Membership Dues -- -- $0
Special Events $1,177,115 $1,076,938 $1,253,478
Revenue In-Kind $343,478 $203,981 $326,367
Other -- $23,675 $604,057

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $1,845,150 $1,603,280 $1,687,433
Administration Expense $208,113 $169,769 $140,469
Fundraising Expense $438,799 $335,396 $308,976
Payments to Affiliates -- -- $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.17 1.26 1.26
Program Expense/Total Expenses 74% 76% 79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 17% 14% 13%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $2,991,722 $2,529,604 $1,980,911
Current Assets $2,922,784 $2,422,197 $1,837,196
Long-Term Liabilities -- $1,343 $93
Current Liabilities $576,390 $539,967 $541,623
Total Net Assets $2,415,332 $1,988,294 $1,439,195

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 5.07 4.49 3.39

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financial statements of PCRF and it's affiliate PCRF, New York as well as consultation with the organization.

Documents


Other Documents

Annual Report (2017)

Annual Report (2016)

No Other Documents currently available.