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Hills For Everyone

 P.O. Box 9835
 Brea, CA 92822
[P] (714) 996-0502
[F] --
www.HillsForEveryone.org
[email protected]
Claire Schlotterbeck
FOUNDED: 1976
INCORPORATED: 1983
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Employer Identification Number 95-3786751 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

Hills For Everyone's mission is "to protect, preserve and restore the environmental resources and natural environs of the Puente-Chino Hills and surrounding areas for the enjoyment of current and succeeding generations..." Four counties come together in these hills. Regional efforts to save the area have been underway since 1977. Conservationists have been remarkably successful. In the western part of the Corridor, 4,000 acres are protected above Whittier while 14,000 acres are set aside in the east as Chino Hills State Park. The entire hillside system is now connected to the Cleveland National Forest at Coal Canyon along the 91 freeway in Anaheim. The challenge remains. Threats to the integrity of the State Park, its borders in Brea, Yorba Linda, and Chino Hills, and the Wildlife Corridor in general continue to emerge. We also remain vigilant in working to secure the “Missing Middle” of the Wildlife Corridor, the undeveloped hills along the 57 freeway north of Brea. These lands are owned by Aera Energy, a subsidiary of Shell-ExxonMobil and the City of Industry.

Mission Statement

Hills For Everyone's mission is "to protect, preserve and restore the environmental resources and natural environs of the Puente-Chino Hills and surrounding areas for the enjoyment of current and succeeding generations..." Four counties come together in these hills. Regional efforts to save the area have been underway since 1977. Conservationists have been remarkably successful. In the western part of the Corridor, 4,000 acres are protected above Whittier while 14,000 acres are set aside in the east as Chino Hills State Park. The entire hillside system is now connected to the Cleveland National Forest at Coal Canyon along the 91 freeway in Anaheim. The challenge remains. Threats to the integrity of the State Park, its borders in Brea, Yorba Linda, and Chino Hills, and the Wildlife Corridor in general continue to emerge. We also remain vigilant in working to secure the “Missing Middle” of the Wildlife Corridor, the undeveloped hills along the 57 freeway north of Brea. These lands are owned by Aera Energy, a subsidiary of Shell-ExxonMobil and the City of Industry.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $293,683.00
Projected Revenue $458,683.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Land Use Advocacy
  • Threats to Protected Parklands
  • Creating Funding for Land Acquisition
  • Bridging and Building Friends and Partners
  • Awaken the Wonder

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

Hills For Everyone's mission is "to protect, preserve and restore the environmental resources and natural environs of the Puente-Chino Hills and surrounding areas for the enjoyment of current and succeeding generations..." Four counties come together in these hills. Regional efforts to save the area have been underway since 1977. Conservationists have been remarkably successful. In the western part of the Corridor, 4,000 acres are protected above Whittier while 14,000 acres are set aside in the east as Chino Hills State Park. The entire hillside system is now connected to the Cleveland National Forest at Coal Canyon along the 91 freeway in Anaheim. The challenge remains. Threats to the integrity of the State Park, its borders in Brea, Yorba Linda, and Chino Hills, and the Wildlife Corridor in general continue to emerge. We also remain vigilant in working to secure the “Missing Middle” of the Wildlife Corridor, the undeveloped hills along the 57 freeway north of Brea. These lands are owned by Aera Energy, a subsidiary of Shell-ExxonMobil and the City of Industry.

Background Statement

Hills For Everyone (HFE) was formed in 1976 to protect the unique, rare, and disappearing landscapes in the Chino Hills by establishing Chino Hills State Park (CHSP).  These hills lie at the juncture of Southern California’s four most populous counties: Orange, Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernardino. Volunteers hiked, photographed, and documented the natural and cultural resources. We still present slide shows (PowerPoints), work to protect the park’s remaining unsecured ridge line boundaries, and are involved in planning processes of numerous local governments.

While advocating for CHSP, HFE members educated elected officials about the value of open space in this highly urbanized region. A bipartisan and bicameral coalition of state legislators secured funds through five Park Bond Acts that our volunteers worked to pass. With 35 separate acquisitions the State has spent nearly $120 million, making it the most complicated set of acquisitions in state park history. Since the Park lies within an hour’s drive of over half of California’s population, a wilderness experience is now available to people who might not otherwise be able to afford to travel to a distant locale.

Though our earliest goal was the creation and completion of CHSP, we have since widened our vision. With our increased understanding of conservation biology and the need to save and connect large habitats to preserve the region’s rich biodiversity, we are working to permanently protect remaining critical parcels of undeveloped land in the Puente-Chino Hills hillside system. CHSP protects 14,100 acres in the eastern part of the hills, while another 4,000 acres in the west have been saved near Whittier. After combining forces across the hills nearly 25 years ago, HFE coordinated efforts to secure funds to add Coal Canyon Wildlife Corridor to the State Park. These parcels on both sides of the 91 freeway comprised the last viable linkage between this hillside system and the Santa Ana Mountains at Coal Canyon. It marks the first time a state agency purchased land solely for connectivity. Without the Coal Canyon connection, the entire Puente-Chino hillside system would have become “an island” of habitat and, over time, native species would have declined due to a limited gene pool and loss of large predators.
 
We still work to ensure the Wildlife Corridor and the ecological integrity of the hills are protected for future generations.

Impact Statement

Hills For Everyone has been cumulatively successful in its efforts to establish Chino Hills State Park and connect the Puente-Chino Hills Wildlife Corridor. Our top five successes of the last year include:

· Assisting local residents to organize and oppose two poorly planned hillside developments that will threaten the integrity of Chino Hills State Park; these included the Madrona Project in Brea and the Esperanza Hills project in county territory above Yorba Linda.

· Winning our legal challenge against the City of Brea in its approval of the 162-unit Madrona project; the judge and Appellate ordered the City of Brea to revoke the project approvals. We are working now to acquire the land for conservation

· Supporting California State Parks by outreaching to local decision makers including conducting tours, making PowerPoint presentations, tabling and hosting events.

· Partnering with numerous other groups to promote conservation, establish funding sources for acquisition and encourage appropriate use of the parkland; and,

· Worked with impacted cities to oppose the solar farm on Tres Hermanos Ranch in upper Tonner Canyon.

Additionally, our top five goals for this next year include:

· Supporting residents who are challenging poorly planned projects that impact the Corridor.

· Participation in important land use decisions that have the potential to impact the Wildlife Corridor;

· Implementation of our evolving Fundraising and Communications Plan;

· Continued legal challenges on lands adjacent to the State Park where poorly planned developments or uses threaten the integrity of the Park and its resources including opposing a private off highway vehicle park planned next to the State Park; and,

· Continue to work to secure and protect funding mechanisms for land acquisition to complete the ridge lines of the State Park.


Needs Statement

HFE’s top five most pressing needs are funding for:

1. Planning and legal expertise to address land use issues to ensure the biological functionality of the Wildlife Corridor remains intact;

2. Outreach and education about the Wildlife Corridor and its important role in the quality of life of the region;
 
3. Coordination of joint efforts to protect the hills; and,
 
4. Continued legal presence when projects arise that threaten protected lands
 
5. Funding to transition our records into a donor management system.

 


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Donations may also be made by mail, with checks payable and mailed to: Hills For Everyone P.O. Box 9835 Brea, CA 92822 

Geographic Area Served

North Orange County
The Wildlife Corridor spans four counties (Orange, Los Angeles, Riverside, and San Bernardino). Nearly half of Chino Hills State Park lies in northern Orange County with the entire four-county area benefiting from the preservation of the Corridor lands.

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
  2. Environment - Land Resources Conservation
  3. Environment - Alliances & Advocacy

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Programs


Land Use Advocacy

In the late 1970s, Hills For Everyone worked with state officials to design our proposed state park along ridge line boundaries. This would ensure that once a visitor was inside the Park they would not know that 18 million people were just over the ridges. We have stayed involved in land use decisions in numerous cities and the four counties that come together in this region: Orange, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and Riverside. We still work to save the rest of the unprotected ridge lines and to connect the natural lands across the hills to the Puente Hills Preserve in Whittier. From analyzing the impacts of proposed housing developments next to the State Park to resisting efforts to add urban infrastructure in protected parklands, Hills For Everyone is the umbrella organization for knowing the land, collaborating with other organizations, and informing decision makers, residents, and the press across the region. We have worked with legislators on both sides of the aisle and in both houses.
Budget  $40,000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Land Use Planning
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Successes that can be measured over the short-term include the delay of development project review and/or approval due to the participation and input of Hills For Everyone.  For example, a recent discovery of a public road easement could entirely change the outcome of a draconian development adjacent to Chino Hills State Park in Brea.  The creation of a resident-led (but Hills For Everyone advised) coalition in Yorba Linda could change the outcome of two hillside projects there.  Finally, by following and providing substantive comments/participation in land use decisions, such as a General Plan or policy, Hills For Everyone can help future conservation efforts in the Wildlife Corridor.  With four counties and 12 cities surrounding the Corridor there seems to be no shortage of projects or policies that need our review and input.
Program Long-Term Success 
After 30 years of advocacy work, numerous successes and shifts in policy decisions have already occurred.  However, there is still room from continued changes and these include:
  • The preservation of the Missing Middle (including the 3,000 acre Shell-Aera and 5,000 acre Tonner Canyon properties);
  • The preservation of lands surrounding our existing parks (including existing proposed developments throughout the Corridor, like Madrona [Brea], Cielo Vista and Esperanza Hills [near Yorba Linda] and the Matrix Oil Project [Whittier];
  • Increase support by agencies, decision makers, and the public for conservation of the region's natural resources;
  • Changed/Improved land use decisions, General Plans, and outcomes of ballot measures related to our existing protected and adjacent land uses; and,
  • The recognition of the sustaining value of habitat and open space in a very urban and populated area. 
Program Success Monitored By 
We will know if our land use advocacy efforts are being effective through measurable successes such as:
  • Meetings requested by developers, residents, agencies, staff, and decision makers;
  • Frequency of publication, quote or involvement in newspaper or other media reports and articles; and,
  • Improved natural resource protection (i.e., saved parkland), decreased water use of a development, reduced footprint for a development (changes the size/scope of the project).
Examples of Program Success  With 30+ years of history behind our efforts, we've seen numerous successes by becoming involved and advocating for improved land use decisions.  For example, Hills For Everyone worked with a broad coalition and a transportation agency to permanently preserve a 296-acre property in Carbon Canyon, adjacent to Chino Hills State Park, that could have been developed with residential units.  We activated Brea residents to run a land use initiative that, even though it barely lost at the ballot box, changed how the City of Brea viewed hillside development.  Getting involved with the revision of the Brea General Plan allowed the antiquated overly aggressive Carbon Canyon Specific Plan to be revoked thereby reducing the density of hillside homes allowed in the canyons near the State Park.  With our advice, Chino Hills also passed an initiative that requires a vote of the people if a developer wants to increase density.  We also helped get very low density (1 unit per 40 acres) designated on lands next to the State Park. Finally, through our partnerships with various cities we helped in the formation of two multi-county and multi-city governmental groups to work toward conservation of natural lands.

Threats to Protected Parklands

Over the 38 years of supporting 35 different acquisitions, we learned we had to also remain engaged to support what we thought we had saved when it became a State Park. In that long term involvement, Hills For Everyone has established credibility among agencies, decision makers, and the public. When a project is proposed that threatens the Park, Hills For Everyone engages numerous strategies (from grassroots organizing to legal remedies) to ensure parklands that have been protected in perpetuity stay protected and don't get nibbled away. We have learned that parklands are often looked at by agencies as a dumping ground for urban infrastructure like roads, utility easements, pipelines, etc. Park staff are already challenged enough with budget and staffing constraints just managing the land. Public involvement is absolutely critical when threats arise. Among other things, we have fought off several highways proposed through the Park, including the northern extension of the 241 toll road.

Budget  $20,000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Land Conservation
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 
Ensuring our parklands remain protected involves numerous little steps that add up to big picture successes given enough time. For example, immediate results from our participation in the protection of parkland means that numerous land use decisions that affect parkland have better outcomes, including:
  • Formal legal comments from our organization has led to local efforts to stop an oil drilling project in the preserved hills above Whittier;
  • Documentation and history regarding a legal settlement from 1982 that finally forced Edison in 2010 to comply by removing deactivated towers and relinquishment of its right-of-way in Chino Hills State Park;
  • Mitigation of impacts to walnut woodlands now is possible due to a settlement agreement with Metropolitan Water District who has built  a new secondary access road to its Deimer crossing the State Park and disrupting woodlands and views at the main entrance to the Park; and,
  • Pressure and documentation to require Caltrans to restore the underpass at Coal Canyon Wildlife Corridor along the 91 freeway 10 years late. 
Program Long-Term Success  Determining long term successes means that lands now protected need an enforcement mechanism such as a conservation easement to ensure the lands and their prized natural resources remain unharmed from urban intrusions.  In addition, as developments or infrastructure projects are proposed, depending on the location, Hills For Everyone may advocate for proper mitigation in or adjacent to the parklands.  We've also been monitoring the implementation and/or fulfillment of obligations promised to State Parks. For example, Hills For Everyone reached a legal settlement with Edison in the early 1980s for a new powerline project.  Edison was required to remove an obsolete set of towers but did not comply with the legally mandated settlement until 2010.  Our history, institutional knowledge, and persistence has proven extremely useful in situations where there is no institutional memory or interest. 
Program Success Monitored By 
Monitoring our successes includes numerous tools we have used to ensure our parklands remain protected.  These tools include maintaining records, knowing when obligations have not been fulfilled, working with staff to prod them into action, and using legal means and public pressure to enforce action. We also keep the lines of communicate open as best we can across all levels of government.  We have also learned how to assess when to proceed with legal action and when to work toward a settlement. All in all, the key to our success is knowing what questions to ask and having the historical knowledge that seems to often be missing from the conversation.
 
Examples of Program Success 
A few key examples of our success as it relates to stopping the threats to protected parklands are:
  • The removal of 8+ miles of inactive powerlines through Chino Hills State Park and relinquishment of the Edison right-of-way;
  • The acquisition of 1,100 acres of land owned by Shell as mitigation for a development in Yorba Linda;
  • Having 160 acres of land purchased for the Olinda Landfill instead be added to the County of Orange's park system; and,
  • Changing agency behavior (such as implementing new fire reducing methods along freeways to reduce fire starts and thereby protecting wildlands).

Creating Funding for Land Acquisition

If permanent conservation is to occur, the key is to secure funding to buy the land. We have actively supported six Park bond acts over the last four decades, worked with state legislators on both sides of the aisle to name Chino Hills State Park as a recipient of funding in budget bills, worked to garner funding through a lawsuit settlement, through mitigation for freeway projects, and through establishing a mitigation fund for landfill expansions. In two acquisitions for the Coal Canyon Wildlife Corridor we helped assemble 22 different sources of funds. Over $200 million of public and private funds have been invested in protecting and restoring the Puente-Chino Hills Wildlife Corridor, natural lands that are within an hour’s drive of over half the state’s population. We are still engaged in continuing to find funding sources to buy the remaining ridge line parcels or parcels that link lands across the hills.
Budget  $15,000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 
Some of the short-terms successes Hills For Everyone has seen through its involvement in parklands include the creation of mitigation programs that link comprehensive conservation planning to transportation project dollars. Using the mitigation funds from the Puente Hills landfill  as an example, We helped secure over $40 million of mitigation funding for use by Brea for the expansion of the Olinda landfill.   We've also been involved in supporting other regional programs which can lead to funding like the Orange County Council of Governments conservation strategy, the Southern California Association of Governments regional advanced mitigation program, etc.  We've completed the necessary and extensive process of creating a Conceptual Area Protection Plan - Land Acquisition Evaluation, which makes the "Missing Middle" eligible for statewide conservation funding from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.  The state also recently authorized expenditures of Cap & Trade dollars for conservation purposes. 
 
Program Long-Term Success 
Long-term successes of creating and advancing new financing tools for protecting and restoring natural land includes:
  • The permanent preservation and/or restoration of important natural lands;
  • The creation of new and thoughtful conservation dollars through non-traditional partnerships; and,
  • A shift in how the conservation community is viewed by agencies, developers, and decision makers.
Program Success Monitored By  Our efforts are clearly working because 18,000 acres of land have been set aside as parkland over the last 40 years. We work hard to ensure existing conservation funding tools (like park bond acts, mitigation dollars) are used appropriately, while at the same time we help create new sources like the Orange County Transportation Authority's Renewed Measure M Environmental Mitigation Program, and two landfill mitigation funds. 
Examples of Program Success 
Our success can be measure by:
  • Nearly 18,000 acres protected in the Puente-Chino Hills Wildlife Corridor;
  • Thirty-three different acquisitions to create Chino Hills State Park;
  • Olinda Landfill mitigation program;
  • Orange County Transportation Authority Environmental Mitigation Program;
  • Orange County Council of Governments Conservation Strategy;
  • Southern California Association of Governments Regional Advanced Mitigation Program; and,
  • Cap and Trade Investment Plan inclusion of a Natural Resources Program.
  • Overturning of the 162 unit Madrona housing project on fire prone hills in Brea. 

Bridging and Building Friends and Partners

With CHSP serving as the anchor parcel for the Puente-Chino Hills Wildlife Corridor, the effort to protect and connect the remaining wildlands requires partnering. We helped establish the Wildlife Corridor Conservation Authority composed of the Whittier, La Habra Heights, Brea, and Diamond Bar, Los Angeles County, Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, and State Parks. We also helped create the Hillside Open Space Education Coalition made up of Whittier, La Habra, La Habra Heights, Brea, Rowland Heights Community Coordinating Council, and the Hacienda Heights Improvement Association. We all work to protect the Missing Middle. Some of our partners include Sierra Club, Friends of Harbors, Beaches and Parks, Friends of the Whittier Hills, the State Park Interpretive Association, Protect Our Homes and Hills, and other neighborhood groups to keep the communication lines open. In other arenas we also work with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, and the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy.

Budget  $30,000.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Short term successes include increasing awareness through all the various channels (social media, website, Powerpoints, conference presentations, newspaper articles, and literature).  We synthesized the message about the Wildlife Corridor and the threats to it.  We are able to visually display the Corridor, its protected lands, and threatened lands through GIS maps which relay the story well.  Our staff is continually asked to provide information, make reports, and presentations on the Wildlife Corridor.  They are also relied upon by agencies, staff, and newspaper reporters for information and updates on hillside and Wildlife Corridor issues and activities.
Program Long-Term Success  The long-term success of our outreach and partnership efforts mainly relate to the larger conservation planning effort for the entire Wildlife Corridor.  Through the creation of a joint-powers authority (the Wildlife Corridor Conservation Authority) and a partnership of cities (Hillside Open Space Education Coalition) the value of important natural lands will not be lost as these entities are watching closely the proposals that impact the region's open space.  This will ultimately lead to better land use decisions and more stewards of the environment.  With our leadership and persistence the Wildlife Corridor will be permanently protected from the Santa Ana Mountains at the 91 and 71 freeways all the way up to the 60 and 605 freeways, spanning four counties and 31 miles.
Program Success Monitored By  We know our efforts are successful because we founded Chino Hills State Park, which continues to grow to this day.  We are one of the few organizations in the region that focuses on broad scale conservation--we are not a single issue organization.  Our history, our flexibility, and nimbleness, and our involvement in the issues allows us to respond quickly and diligently to a threat.  We continue to expand our collaborations to non-traditional partners, including the Orange County Transportation Authority, Orange County Council of Governments, and the Southern California Association of Governments.
Examples of Program Success 
Our successes for outreach and collaboration can be quantified through the following statistics:
  • Creation of a three-county State Park;
  • Work with decision makers at various levels of government, in both houses and on both sides of the aisle;
  • Engage with transportation, fire, planning and resource agencies to protect the region's natural resources; and,
  • Growing support from our members/donors (more than 5,000 individuals involved). 

Awaken the Wonder

Hills For Everyone hopes to reignite people’s interest in all things wild and wonderful after several years of very limited park access due to construction projects and after our involvement in critical, but draining, land use battles. Through our new program “Awaken the Wonder,” Hills For Everyone will partner with another non-profit (Nature of Wildworks) to provide informative, educational, and fun events about local wildlife. From snake dances to baby tarantula parades, the wonders abound. We need to remind people that these wonders are all right here—right in their own backyard.


We are part of a global hotspot of biodiversity—a place rich in species threatened by development. There are only 20 hotspots worldwide—and we live smack dab in the middle of one. Over the next year, using wildlife as the messenger, Hills For Everyone will offer a series of family friendly events across the hills to re-introduce or introduce for the first-time our natural resource conservation work to local residents.
Budget  $12,500.00
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served Families General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Immediate results include a better understanding of the types of wildlife in our region, how to reduce their visitation/conflicts with humans, and improved support for the State Park.
Program Long-Term Success 

This program will educate families surrounding our natural lands about responsible homeownership at the Wildland-Urban Interface.  The goal is to not only educate residents, but also remind them why the State Park and its natural resources are so important.  Better understanding will reduce human-wildlife conflicts and move toward creating better stewards for the region.

Program Success Monitored By  We will know this effort works by the number of attendees at the programs, the number of residents that sign up for e-newsletters/mailed newsletters, and requests for additional information.  Unfortunately data tracking wildlife interactions does not exist, so we won't know how the tools provided during the workshop are or are not ultimately utilized.
Examples of Program Success 
Things such as:
- Reduced interactions with coyotes, bobcat and other urban-friendly critters.
- Increased attendance at our programs and/or our partner programs.
- Increased readership/viewership/engagement on social media and newsletters. 

Management


CEO/Executive Director Claire Schlotterbeck
CEO Term Start July 1980
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Claire Schlotterbeck has been involved in preservation of the Puente-Chino Hills for nearly four decades, playing a key role in the formation of the 14,100+ acre Chino Hills State Park. Claire earned her bachelor's degree in Political Science from UCLA and a Master of Science from Purdue University. Active in her own community, she helped create the Brea Senior Center and the Brea Community Center. Former Republican Assemblyman Dick Ackerman selected Claire as "Woman of the Year in the 72nd Assembly District" in 1998 and former Democratic Senator Josh Newman selected her as "Woman of the Year-Environment" in the 29th Senate District in 2018. In August 2001, she was honored as one of six nationwide recipients of the Chevron Corporation Conservation Award. In March 2002, she was honored by the California State Park Ranger Association as the Honorary State Park Ranger of the Year. Claire has received many other honors as well: Sea and Sage Audubon Society, Whittier Audubon Society, Orange County League of Conservation Voters, and Women For:Orange County, Whittier chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution, etc. She serves as a Secretary of the Governing Board of UCLA UniCamp, UCLA's official student charity.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Dave Myers 1976 1984

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Melanie Schlotterbeck, CMP Technical Consultant Melanie Schlotterbeck works with HFE on GIS mapping, land acquisition, research projects, and outreach efforts. She earned her bachelor's degree in Environmental Geography and her MS in Environmental Science from Cal State Fullerton. In 2007, she was appointed by Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) Directors Bill Campbell (Supervisor) and Carolyn Cavecche (Mayor of Orange) to the Environmental Oversight Committee and then elected as its Vice Chair. This Committee oversees the spending of $243.5 million in acquisition and restoration funding. In this role she represents over 30 conservation and community groups, including HFE, that supported Renewed Measure M. Since 2010, Melanie has been recognized by numerous organizations including the Orange County League of Conservation Voters, Canyon Land Conservation Fund, Sea and Sage Audubon, and Women For: Orange County for her conservation efforts.

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Community Service Whittier Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution 2018
Woman of the Year-Environment Senate District 29 2018
Conservation Award Whittier Area Audubon Society 2016
Political Leadership Sierra Club 2015
Fern Zimmerman Award (to Melanie Schlotterbeck) Sea and Sage Audubon 2012
Suffrage Day Honoree (to Claire and Melanie Schlotterbeck) Women For: Orange County 2012
Chipko Award (one to each: Claire and Melanie Schlotterbeck) Canyon Land Conservation Fund 2010
Green Vision Award (to Melanie Schlotterbeck) Friends of Harbors, Beaches and Parks 2010
Special Recognition Award for Environmental Leadership and Achievement (to Melanie Schlotterbeck) Orange County League of Conservation Voters 2010
Top Achievements of the Environmental Community in Southern California (to Hills For Everyone) Environment Now 2006
Orange County Environmental Activist Leader (to Claire Schlotterbeck) Orange County League of Conservation Voters 2004
Honorary State Park Ranger of the Year (to Claire Schlotterbeck) California State Parks Rangers Association 2002
Fern Zimmerman Award (to Claire Schlotterbeck) Sea and Sage Audubon 2001
National Conservation Award (to Claire Schlotterbeck) Chevron 2001
Certificate of Recognition for Coal Canyon Wildlife Corridor (to Hills For Everyone) Governor's Environmental and Economic Leadership Awards 2000
Woman of the Year (to Claire Schlotterbeck) Assembly District 72 1998
Dewitt Award for Extraordinary Achievement in Establishment of Chino Hills State Park (to Hills For Everyone) California State Parks Department 1997
Commendation, Resolution 25-86 (to Hills For Everyone & Claire Schlotterbeck) California State Parks and Recreation Commission 1986
Judges' Special Award: Silver Medallion (to Claire Schlotterbeck) North Orange County YWCA 1983
Community Service (to Hills For Everyone) Orange County Press Club 1982

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
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External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

Hills For Everyone collaborates with like-minded environmental organizations such as Sierra Club, Audubon, California Native Plant Society, and Friends of Harbors, Beaches and Parks.  We also work closely with agencies and governmental entities such as the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, Hillside Open Space Education Coalition, Wildlife Corridor Conservation Authority, and resource agencies.  More recently HFE has worked with non-traditional partners like the Orange County Transportation Authority, Orange County Council of Governments, Carbon Canyon Fire Safe Council and the Southern California Association of Governments.

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 75
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 0
Not Specified 0

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures No
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency N/A N/A

Government Licenses

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CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Michael Hughes
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Board Chair Term July 2014 - Dec 2019
Board Co-Chair Bev Perry
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Former Mayor of Brea
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2013 - Dec 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Dr. Jack Bath Retired Professor Voting
Jeff Garvin Community Volunteer Voting
Bob Henderson -- Voting
Michael Hughes Former Chair Hacienda Heights Improvement Association Voting
Dr. Carol McKenzie Retired Professor Voting
Bev Perry Former Brea Mayor Voting
Roland vom Dorp -- Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
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Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 7
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 2
Male: 5
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % 85%
Written Board Selection Criteria --
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy --
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 83%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2019 to Dec 31, 2019
Projected Revenue $458,683.00
Projected Expenses $293,683.00
Form 990s

2017 990 Form

2016 990 Form

2015 990 Form

2014 990 Form

2013 990 Form

2012 990 Form

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $331,321 $379,916 $344,063
Total Expenses $296,129 $380,089 $339,626

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$331,295 $379,890 $343,986
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- $0
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- $0
Earned Revenue -- -- $0
Investment Income, Net of Losses $26 $26 $77
Membership Dues -- -- $0
Special Events -- -- $0
Revenue In-Kind -- -- $0
Other -- -- $0

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $288,630 $373,705 $334,742
Administration Expense $7,499 $6,384 $4,884
Fundraising Expense -- -- $0
Payments to Affiliates -- -- $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.12 1.00 1.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses 97% 98% 99%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $164,743 $129,551 $129,724
Current Assets $164,743 $129,551 $129,724
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- $0
Current Liabilities -- -- $0
Total Net Assets $164,743 $129,551 $129,724

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities inf inf inf

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy Income Only
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the form 990 EZ's and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.