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RTH Stroke Foundation

 23382 Mill Creek Drive, #130
 Laguna Hills, CA 92653
[P] (949) 305-8450
[F] (949) 916-1780
www.rthfoundation.org
[email protected]
Deborah Massaglia
FOUNDED: 1996
INCORPORATED: 1996
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA OC Stroke Association
RTH Stroke Foundation
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 33-0809745 00000

Summary


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Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of the RTH Stroke Foundation is to eliminate stroke whenever and wherever possible. People suffer 795,000 strokes in the U.S. every year, 144,000 of which result in death.  Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death, and although most strokes occur to people 65 or older, stroke can attack people of any age or gender.

But experts in vascular medicine say that fully eight out of every ten strokes can be prevented. That means we have it in our power to reduce the annual incidence of stroke from 795,000 to less than 160,000, The key is awareness. Only a fraction of the American population understands the lifestyle and medical steps they need to take to keep them out of the high-risk stroke pool. Fewer than one in five can recognize the symptoms of a stroke at its onset.

The RTH Stroke Foundation aggressively pursues this under informed segment of our population. Every year we hold free stroke awareness seminars for several thousand attendees at which experts in the field explain what people have to do to reduce the likelihood of stroke. We conduct free diagnostic screenings for aneurysms, blood pressure, carotid narrowing and cholesterol. These screenings identify people at various stages of risk, including some whose lives may have been literally saved because they had no idea that they had an aneurysm or a severely restricted carotid. And we hold free monthly stroke support meetings to help stroke victims, their families and caregivers learn how to adjust to the stroke victim’s new normal.

The quest to reduce the incidence of stroke so drastically may seem Quixotic to some, but not to us. It’s the reason we come to work every day.  

 

 

Mission Statement

The mission of the RTH Stroke Foundation is to eliminate stroke whenever and wherever possible. People suffer 795,000 strokes in the U.S. every year, 144,000 of which result in death.  Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death, and although most strokes occur to people 65 or older, stroke can attack people of any age or gender.

But experts in vascular medicine say that fully eight out of every ten strokes can be prevented. That means we have it in our power to reduce the annual incidence of stroke from 795,000 to less than 160,000, The key is awareness. Only a fraction of the American population understands the lifestyle and medical steps they need to take to keep them out of the high-risk stroke pool. Fewer than one in five can recognize the symptoms of a stroke at its onset.

The RTH Stroke Foundation aggressively pursues this under informed segment of our population. Every year we hold free stroke awareness seminars for several thousand attendees at which experts in the field explain what people have to do to reduce the likelihood of stroke. We conduct free diagnostic screenings for aneurysms, blood pressure, carotid narrowing and cholesterol. These screenings identify people at various stages of risk, including some whose lives may have been literally saved because they had no idea that they had an aneurysm or a severely restricted carotid. And we hold free monthly stroke support meetings to help stroke victims, their families and caregivers learn how to adjust to the stroke victim’s new normal.

The quest to reduce the incidence of stroke so drastically may seem Quixotic to some, but not to us. It’s the reason we come to work every day.  

 

 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2017
Projected Expenses $924,413.00
Projected Revenue $910,672.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Stroke Newsletter English / Spanish
  • Stroke Education Seminars / Free Stroke Screenings
  • Support Group Expansion
  • Stoke Respite In-Home
  • Nurse

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

The mission of the RTH Stroke Foundation is to eliminate stroke whenever and wherever possible. People suffer 795,000 strokes in the U.S. every year, 144,000 of which result in death.  Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death, and although most strokes occur to people 65 or older, stroke can attack people of any age or gender.

But experts in vascular medicine say that fully eight out of every ten strokes can be prevented. That means we have it in our power to reduce the annual incidence of stroke from 795,000 to less than 160,000, The key is awareness. Only a fraction of the American population understands the lifestyle and medical steps they need to take to keep them out of the high-risk stroke pool. Fewer than one in five can recognize the symptoms of a stroke at its onset.

The RTH Stroke Foundation aggressively pursues this under informed segment of our population. Every year we hold free stroke awareness seminars for several thousand attendees at which experts in the field explain what people have to do to reduce the likelihood of stroke. We conduct free diagnostic screenings for aneurysms, blood pressure, carotid narrowing and cholesterol. These screenings identify people at various stages of risk, including some whose lives may have been literally saved because they had no idea that they had an aneurysm or a severely restricted carotid. And we hold free monthly stroke support meetings to help stroke victims, their families and caregivers learn how to adjust to the stroke victim’s new normal.

The quest to reduce the incidence of stroke so drastically may seem Quixotic to some, but not to us. It’s the reason we come to work every day.  

 

 


Background Statement

Our foundation came about because of the life experiences of Roxanna Todd Hodges, after whom it is named.  Ms. Hodges, a native of Minnesota, became a community leader in Santa Monica. Later in life she suffered a series of strokes, the first in 1995 and the last in 2005, which left her confined to her bed. Her understanding of the critical need for stroke “brain attack” awareness and treatment advances led her to establish the Roxanna Todd Hodges Foundation.  Her last words were “Strike out stroke wherever you can.”

Deborah Massaglia, President and Trustee of the Foundation, helped Roxanna Todd Hodges develop the Foundation and now runs the day-to-day operations.  We are a lean organization with just five fulltime employees who are assisted by a small corps of volunteers, many of whom choose to work with us because they or their families have been touched by stroke.

Our two primary activities are (1) conducting community education seminars and screenings, and (2) providing stroke survivors and their families with education and support.

We have been fortunate to have a strong working association with Keck Medical Center, USC which operates the Roxanna Todd Hodges Comprehensive Stroke Clinic and the Roxanna Todd Hodges Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Program. World class experts in stroke research and treatment provide us with invaluable support, including speaking at some of our seminars, providing articles for our newsletter, and advising us on developments in stroke research and treatment.


Impact Statement

2013

Seminars and Screenings: We set a goal of holding 50 free stroke awareness seminars during 2013.  We will exceed our goal of 50 with four in November and December.

We set a goal of 3,000 people educated at our seminars in 2013.  By October the number reached 3,012, with more to come.

We set a goal of providing 2,000 seminar attendees with free diagnostic screening for stroke-related medical conditions. We have already exceeded that target with 2,133 people screened for aneurysm, carotid narrowing, blood pressure and cholesterol levels.  All those screened received an up-to-date picture of their condition, and the condition of six was considered sufficiently critical that they were referred for immediate treatment.

Newsletters.Our goal for 2013 was to publish six newsletters with stroke-related information about nutrition, exercise, patient checkups and similar topics.  We published all six, and increased our mailing list to 2500.

Support.Again this year we held 24 free support group sessions at our offices in Laguna Hills.  We invite stroke survivors, their family members and their caregivers.  At these events stroke patients learn not just how to survive but how to thrive in their new condition.   400 people attended our support events in 2013.

2014

Screening Follow-up. We have referred some attendees with extremely poor diagnostic test results to doctors. Beginning in January we are going to be more proactive.  A nurse is being brought on staff who will examine all test results, cull those that are outside the acceptable range, make follow-up calls to that person and the person’s doctor.  Test scores are nice to know but we want to make sure something is done about the marginal ones.

Seminars and Screenings. We want to expand our attendance at both by at least 30%.

Newsletters. We intend to double our newsletter circulation.


Needs Statement

1. Expansion of Seminars and Screenings.The more we can educate, the more people we can help avoid stroke.  Therefore we have a goal of increasing the number of our seminars and screenings by 30% during 2014. 

2. Addition of a staff nurse.Volunteer nurses have staffed our seminars and screenings.  However, we need a trained nurse in our office to follow up with (1) diagnostic attendees whose test numbers were poor, and (2) the regular doctors of these attendees.

3. Increased Newsletter Circulation.We need to increase stroke awareness among as many people as possible.  The newsletter is an effective vehicle for doing that.

4.  In-Home Stroke Respite.We want to give a break to caregivers, especially those whose patients are suffering with the most severe effects of strokes. Every caregiver needs time for necessary financial and other errands, medical appointments, and basic rest and recreation.  Both the caregiver and the patient benefit from respite.

5.Expansion of Stroke Support Groups. Stroke survivors begin to adjust to their new condition in the hospital. Our free support groups allow patients, families and caregivers to continue this process for months and years, in a positive setting with others affected by strokes.


CEO Statement

I want to repeat something from our mission statement because I think it is so important.  “The mission of the RTH Stroke Foundation is to eliminate stroke whenever and wherever possible. People suffer 795,000 strokes in the U.S. every year,144,000 of which result in death.”  Dire statistics, but there is one that is even more startling: experts in stroke research and treatment say that eight out of every ten strokes can be prevented —eight out of ten! 

The key is public awareness.  People can take steps in their everyday lives to mitigate the effects of most of their risk factors for stroke — not all, but most.  But most people don’t know how.  Which is why we work so hard to educate the Orange County community about stroke and to give as many of them as possible diagnostic tests to let them know the state of their vascular health.

If you’re a donor you want to know where your dollars are going. In February alone donations enabled 300 people to receive $150,000 in free carotid artery screenings. They also helped to pay for more than $100,000 in free aneurysm and blood pressure screenings. This year they will enable us to give seminars attended by more than 3,000 people. They fund twice-monthly support groups at our offices that provide invaluable help to stroke survivors and their families and caregivers.

At least ten people got to our screenings just in time this year.  They had life-threatening conditions without knowing.  Thanks to the screening they were referred for immediate medical attention.

Our operating model enables us to put donor money directly to work affecting the lives of literally thousands of people.  As is noted elsewhere, the last words of Roxanna Todd Hodges were“Strike out stroke wherever you can.” This is what we do every day of the week.


Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

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Geographic Area Served

South Orange County
Central Orange County
West Orange County
South Orange County
North Orange County
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Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Public Health
  2. Health Care - Patient & Family Support
  3. Human Services - Family Services

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Programs


Stroke Newsletter English / Spanish

We publish an eight-page newsletter in both English and Spanish, and distribute it to a total readership of about 2,500. Each issue contains stroke-related articles on diet, exercise, blood pressure, sodium intake, preventive testing, and related topics.  Much of the material is staff written while a significant number of articles are authored by researchers at Keck USC Hospital with which we have a close working relationship. We design and print the newsletter in house, which gives greater flexibility and also the opportunity to use considerable color in our design, thus creating an attractive product.

Our newsletter budget for 2014 is $45,000 which includes all staff time, production costs and mailing for a print run of about 3,000.

 

Budget  45,000
Category  Education, General/Other Adult Education
Population Served At-Risk Populations Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success 

The near-term and long-term successes of our newsletter are identical. We want positive behavior modification in the areas of nutrition, exercise and patient-doctor relationship. So we will use reader interest as a gauge of short-term improvement. Beginning with our January-February issue each article will have a brief note at the end telling the reader how they can send an email and get more information on the article’s topic. Simply wanting more information doesn’t demonstrate any health improvement, but it is a necessary and encouraging first step.   Our goal will be to have at least 25% of our readers request more information during the course of each calendar year.

Program Long-Term Success 

The newsletter is a behavior modification tool.  We are particularly interested in having readers achieve three results.  (1) Improve their nutritional choices, (2)  begin or expand their exercise regimen, and (3) consult with their doctor regularly, especially about stroke and cardio-related matters. We will gauge the results from responses we get to a questionnaire we will send annually with the November-December issue to people on the subscriber list. 

Program Success Monitored By 

The surveys mentioned in the long-term success portion and the responses in the short-term success will be our major tools.  Our staff will monitor these. Staff will also keep notes and records of other contacts with readers who call, email or otherwise communicate with us about behavioral changes in the three areas mentioned.

Examples of Program Success 

We will follow up with additional contacts to those who have (1) responded to our questionnaires and (2) emailed or otherwise requested more information about newsletter articles.  Our follow-up will ask for specific resulting changes, e.g., weight loss, improved blood pressure readings, improved cholesterol screening results, more regular doctor visits, and the like.


Stroke Education Seminars / Free Stroke Screenings

Stroke awareness seminars are one-and-one-half hour sessions led by professionals in the field. As we have noted elsewhere there are 795,000 strokes in the U.S. every year, but fully 80% can be prevented when people are armed with the right knowledge. We want to make people aware of (1) their risk factors, (2) the medical diagnostic test they should have, and (3) the symptoms a person feels at the onset of a stroke so that they can, as much as possible, take themselves out of the high-risk category. 

We are seeking $30,000 in additional support so we can increase the number of seminars. This will cover site rental, seminar materials, transportation and related expenses.

 
Budget  30,000
Category  Education, General/Other Educational Programs
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens At-Risk Populations
Program Short-Term Success 

Every person who attends a seminar is asked to complete a detailed evaluation and virtually all of them do. Our goal is to have at least 70% of the attendees answer at least five of the six objective questions in the affirmative.  We have never yet failed to meet this goal. In addition there are five one-sentence subjective questions designed to guide us in designing future events.

Program Long-Term Success 

During 2014 we will ask a percentage of attendees who also take our diagnostic screening to become volunteers in a three-year annual follow-up study. The study group will be divided into low-risk, moderate-risk, and high-risk categories based on their diagnostic screening results. The data we are seeking are indicators of progress, or lack of progress, in improving their diagnostic numbers. We expect that the average results from all groups combined will show that 30% will experience significant improvement, 50% will remain static, and 20% will show some regression.

Program Success Monitored By 

Our staff uses the assessment evaluations as their primary gauge of an individual seminar’s success.  In addition we hold informal conversations with attendees during breaks and after the event and later as a staff get together for a one-hour comparison of any anecdotal information that might help us understand how the event was received. 

Examples of Program Success 

The best indicator we’ve had thus far of program success is public response.  We had moderate signups for some of our early events, but this year have found we needed to add events and add more space to existing events to satisfy demand.  Positive word of mouth is not a quantifiable gauge, but it is the only way we can  account for the increased interest in our seminars.


Support Group Expansion

You can’t plan for a stroke the way you do for a wedding or a business trip.  They just happen out of the blue. In the first post-stroke day the patient and the family are quietly worried about the same thing: What now? 

Most hospitals work hard at helping patients transition to their “new normal.”  But soon it’s time to leave the hospital, and patients are cut adrift from the 24/7 assistance they had been receiving, 

Twice each month we hold free stroke support sessions for stroke survivors, their families and their caregivers. We want them all to come for as many months or years as they need. These are positive meetings where stroke survivors learn not just how to survive but how to thrive in their new condition. Much of the encouragement comes from our staff but much of it also comes from those attendees who may be many months removed from their strokes and who have marvelous success stories to share with others.            

 $15,000, which will enable us to offer session in North Orange County each month.
 
Budget  15,000
Category  Diseases, Disorders & Medical Disciplines, General/Other Medical Disciplines & Occupations
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

The first short-term success has already been achieved when survivors walk into their first support session. In most cases it means they have accepted their condition and want to do something positive about it.  The second occurs the first time a survivor speaks out in a group session, which to us signifies that the person is becoming part of the group. The next and most important short-term successes are when the patient returns for a second and third meeting and beyond.

Program Long-Term Success 

There are successes survivors experience along the way in their post-stroke life: being able to go home from the hospital or rehab, getting out for one’s first trip to a restaurant or a movie, meeting with one’s employer to discuss getting back to work, and finally actually getting to work, either in the former position or a different one more suited to the stroke survivor’s condition.  These are the long-term successes we want to continue to achieve.  It’s a group effort involving patient, family, caregiver and staff. Some of us on staff have never heard a more emotional ovation as when an ongoing stroke survivor announces to the group, “I went back to work last week.” It’s a success for one and encouragement for all.

Program Success Monitored By 

Our staff does the monitoring as a group.  We determine what patients are achieving and what we need to do to help them make more progress.  We evaluate caregivers and family in a similar way because the patient’s ultimate progress depends in large measure on the quality of the understanding and care that others provide.

Examples of Program Success 

We had a patient come to his first meeting, helped slowly by a caregiver and taken to a seat. He had all the body language of a person who figured life as he knew it was gone forever.  We — the staff and the group — worked on that.  The group particularly encouraged him to jump into occupational therapy with all the enthusiasm he could summon.   It was gradual, but he did it.  He still comes to meetings but today he walks on his own, smiles most of the time, and engages others in the room in pre-meeting conversations.  We have other examples of people who have returned to work, taken up new hobbies that excite them and returned to some of their former recreational pursuits, like golf and swimming.


Stoke Respite In-Home

The second victims of many strokes are the family members who suddenly find themselves as caregivers. Depending upon the severity of the stroke, their new responsibilities vary from minimal care to a virtually 24/7 on-call status. The respite program is designed to give caregivers time away from their duties for relaxation or for taking care of their own needs. 

$20,000 per year/$1,667 per month, all for payment to the respite provider roughly 83 hours of care per month.

Budget  20,000
Category  Health Care, General/Other Home Health Care
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent People/Families of People with Health Conditions Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 

No matter how dedicated the caregiver is, respite service gives that person something to look forward to, a kind of TGIF feeling.  Specialists in this field say this is just as important for the stroke patient as it is for the caregiver.

Program Long-Term Success 

We anticipate 83 hours per week will be distributed to those applicants deemed most in need of the service. Vetted home care agencies will provide the respite service.  We expect two long-term benefits: (1) A break that will give the caregiver a welcome emotional and physical relief from the ongoing care duties, and (2) a change of pace for the stroke victim.

Program Success Monitored By 

Both the caregiver and the stroke patient will respond to a brief objective survey. Our staff will evaluate the results.  We expect at a minimum an average of 70% positive responses. 

Examples of Program Success 

Respite care allows loved ones to remain in the home and is therefore a cost-effective way to prevent or delay more expensive out-of-home or institutional placements.

Providing respite care makes sense because it:

  • Reduces family stress
  • Reduces the risk of abuse and neglect
  • Enhances family coping abilities
  • Increases feelings of well-being
  • Allows families to stay involved in their communities, helping them identify and establish additional support systems
  • Increases opportunities for social activities and family interactions
  • Improves attitudes toward the individual with the special need or circumstance
  • Strengthens the family’s ability to care for their loved one at home
  • Saves public funds by reducing residential, hospital and other costly out-of-home placements

Nurse

We regularly need a nurse to assist at seminars, post-seminar diagnostic testing, and monthly support group meetings.  Thus far in 2013 we have used the services of several different volunteer nurses, all of them competent but with understandably different work styles and varying degrees of experience in our particular medical emphasis.  We believe our seminar attendees, diagnostic patients, and support group members would be better served if we had one regular part-time nurse with special training in stroke treatment who could be a staff person and thus available for duties in addition to seminars and other events, such as doing follow-up monitoring of patients with marginal diagnostic scores. 

Estimated annual budget is $55,000 all for nurse’s salary and any benefits.

Budget  55,000
Category  Employment, General/Other Employment, General/Other
Population Served General/Unspecified General/Unspecified People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success 

We anticipate three short-term benefits from this program.  (1) More efficient team operation because the nurse would become an integrated part of our group. (2) Less time required by team members bringing the nurse up to speed on our operations. (3) Improved quality of care as the nurse becomes acclimated to the needs of the people we serve.

Program Long-Term Success 

The major long-term success we expect will come from the follow-up duties the nurse will do. At the moment we have no staff who can evaluate the test results from a single diagnostic session, flag those that are marginal, and follow up with both the patient and, if possible, the patient’s doctor. We believe this proactive approach will both prevent strokes and save lives.

Program Success Monitored By 

Like all staff members, the nurse will be evaluated, for the first year as a probationary employee, and subsequently as a permanent staff member.

Examples of Program Success 

Since this is a new program we cannot cite successes.  However we have had a half-dozen instances of the people’s lives literally being saved on the spot because the tests showed they had life-threatening conditions.  We believe if we had a nurse follow up with those who had poor results, though not immediately life-threatening, we would almost certainly prevent strokes and death.


Management


CEO/Executive Director Deborah Massaglia
CEO Term Start May 1998
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Guy Navarro Executive Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

--

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: --
Asian American/Pacific Islander: --
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: --
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 4
Male: 1
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

--

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Deborah Massaglia
Board Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Chair Term -
Board Co-Chair Alyson Peterson
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Alyson Peterson -- --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 2
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 0
Male: 2
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria --
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy --
Percentage of Monetary Contributions --
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Board Orientation --

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

--

Standing Committees

    --

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2014 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2013 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017
Projected Revenue $910,672.00
Projected Expenses $924,413.00
Form 990s

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 990pf

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Revenue $1,538,361 $2,047,457 $910,672
Total Expenses $625,227 $1,983,857 $924,413

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,408,644 $2,002,111 $866,875
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- $18,096
Investment Income, Net of Losses $39,177 $2,364 $1,620
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- $24,081
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other $92,540 $42,976 --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Program Expense $13,300 $1,520,130 $514,981
Administration Expense $611,927 $463,727 $409,432
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 2.46 1.03 0.99
Program Expense/Total Expenses 2% 77% 56%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Total Assets $921,212 $102,739 $39,786
Current Assets $51,547 $60,131 $34,618
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities $7,090 -- $55,615
Total Net Assets $914,122 $102,739 $-15,829

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 7.27 inf 0.62

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2015 2014 2013
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? --
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the Form 990-PF's and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions for 2010, 2011 and 2012. 

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.