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Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County

 1801 E. Edinger Ave., Ste. 101
 Santa Ana, CA 92705
[P] (714) 544-7773
[F] (714) 544-7643
http://www.ocbigs.org
www.iebigs.org
[email protected]
Melissa Beck
FOUNDED: 1958
INCORPORATED: 1958
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire
Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Inland Empire
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Employer Identification Number 95-1992702 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

 

Our Purpose: For every child to have the opportunity to succeed in life and live up to their full potential.
 
Our Mission: To provide strong and enduring, one-to-one, professionally supported mentoring relationships for every child who needs and wants one.
 
Our Vision: To change the life of a child for the better, forever.

Mission Statement

 

Our Purpose: For every child to have the opportunity to succeed in life and live up to their full potential.
 
Our Mission: To provide strong and enduring, one-to-one, professionally supported mentoring relationships for every child who needs and wants one.
 
Our Vision: To change the life of a child for the better, forever.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $7,691,721.00
Projected Revenue $7,730,764.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • School-Based Mentoring
  • Community-Based Mentoring
  • Workplace Mentoring
  • Destination Future - 18+ Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

 

Our Purpose: For every child to have the opportunity to succeed in life and live up to their full potential.
 
Our Mission: To provide strong and enduring, one-to-one, professionally supported mentoring relationships for every child who needs and wants one.
 
Our Vision: To change the life of a child for the better, forever.

Background Statement

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America’s roots date to 1904, when Ernest Coulter, a New York City court clerk, established Big Brothers to match caring adults with young people who were getting into trouble. At the same time, members of Ladies of Charity were befriending girls who had come through the New York Children’s Court. That group would later become Catholic Big Sisters, and subsequently, Big Sisters International. These groups worked independently until 1977, when Big Brothers Association and Big Sisters International joined forces and became Big Brothers Big Sisters of America.

Big Brothers of Orange County was established in 1958 at a meeting of the Men’s Club of the First Presbyterian Church of Santa Ana when an FBI agent suggested a mentoring program for youth be founded to combat juvenile delinquency in Orange County.  In 1961, Big Sisters of Orange County was founded, and in 1981 the two agencies merged to become Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County. 

The children served today by BBBSOC experience the same challenges as the youth identified back in 1904. They are among the thousands of children in our community who have an absent mother or father, or sometimes both parents due to death, divorce, incarceration or abandonment. They are living in densely populated, low-income neighborhoods that are often plagued with violence, drugs and criminal street gangs. Many have experienced abuse and neglect. They are lacking structure, direction, and a sense of hope for their futures. They all need a positive adult who can be a friend, coach, and mentor that guides, encourages and motivates them to live successful, meaningful lives, and make significant contributions to the world around them. 


Impact Statement

We served 3,538 children and youth this past year across Orange County and the Inland Empire. 100% of mentees graduated high school. 61% were the first generation in their family to graduate. 96% set postsecondary plans to pursue college, military, or vocational careers.

74% reported an increase in academic achievement. 100% refrained from criminal activity.

Charity Navigator 4-Star Rating Recipient: We are proud of this year’s 4 Star Rating, which means our agency exceeds industry standards and outperforms most charities in our Cause area.

Melissa Beck, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire, was honored at the EY Entrepreneur of the Year Orange County awards gala as the 2018 Social Entrepreneur.

Orange County Business Journal 2017 Best Places to Work: BBBSOC was named one of Orange County's 2017 Best Places to work! We were one of only two non-profits that made the list, and we were ranked 17th in the medium business category.


Needs Statement

While our volunteers are unpaid, there is a cost of $1,500 per match each year. Funding is needed to support:

1) Volunteer Recruitment & Engagement: We have staff in the community on a continual basis that are conducting orientations, Lunch and Learn sessions and community outreach events. Additionally, once a volunteer is mentoring a child, we ensure they are feeling engaged and rewarded in order to retain their service and rely on them to ask others in their network to join our program.

2) Enrollment/Screening: We employ professionally, degreed staff that is charged with conducting family, child and volunteer assessments. This ensures that the children’s needs/interests, parent’s preferences, and volunteer’s skills and assets are all being evaluated and addressed. Additionally, it is imperative that we maintain our priority to ensure child safety by thoroughly screening and training volunteers.

3) Match Support: Each facilitated match is assigned to a professional Match Support Specialist that makes monthly phone or personal contact with the child, parent and mentor to ensure that match is going well, achieving match goals, and address any challenges, in order to ensure we are making the highest impact we can on each client.


CEO Statement



Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County and the Inland Empire offers adult and peer mentoring to make an impact on the children we serve. You may donate online at www.OCbigs.org or mail a check to: BBBSOC & IE, 1801 E. Edinger Ave., Ste. 101, Santa Ana, CA 92705, or by phone at (714) 544-7773. We also accept in-kind donations. For more information on in-kind donations contact Sloane Keane, Chief Development Officer at (714) 619-7048.  BBBSOC is always in need of new volunteer mentors. We currently serve over 3,560 children annually, and there is always a waiting list of children in need of a Big Brother or Big Sister. Our three-year strategic goal will have us serving 4,000 youth by December 2019.  We have Community- and Site-Based programs to choose from.  Volunteers must be:-18 years of age or older (unless applying for High School Bigs program) -Be an Orange County or Inland Empire resident for at least one month -Be employed at current job for at least one month (or may be a college student, retiree or homemaker) -Be willing to commit at least one year to volunteer with the program Have a vehicle, current CA driver’s license, and current proof of auto insurance To apply to be a volunteer you can complete an online inquiry form at https://www.ocbigs.org/volunteer.  Once you complete the form, a member of our staff will contact you.    If you are a high school, please contact our Site Based Peer Mentoring Director Cristal Ochoa at 714-544-5612 to set up a high school bigs club.

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Central Orange County
West Orange County
South Orange County
North Orange County
Every city in Orange County, and metro Riverside County and San Bernardino County (Ontario, Rancho Cucamonga, Colton, Chino, Moreno Valley, Fontana, Rialto, Redlands, Upland and San Bernardino)

Organization Categories

  1. Youth Development - Big Brother, Big Sisters
  2. Human Services - Children's and Youth Services
  3. Education - Higher Education

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Programs


School-Based Mentoring

Like our community based program, our school-based program offers one-to-one mentoring for children in the community at participating schools and are facilitated by our team.

The Site-Based Mentoring Program matches qualified high school student leaders (volunteers) with at-risk elementary school youth. While our focus is the service to the at-risk elementary school student, we create a double impact of service by mentoring to the high school volunteers.  We promote healthy youth development by providing emotional, academic, and social support through one-to-one peer mentoring, while empowering high school mentors to become future community leaders. Currently we have 43 high schools participating in Orange County, serving 28 elementary schools.
 
 
Budget  $891,809.04
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served At-Risk Populations K-12 (5-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 
When at-risk youth are able to build self-esteem and improve their self-confidence, as well as are exposed to positive enrichment and recreation, they are able to improve in other areas of their life, such as becoming more motivated in school, having a better sense of their future, and improving health, which eventually leads to them being able to positively impact their friends and families, their schools, and their communities.

Program alumni report that having a Big mentor in their lives positively influenced their self-confidence, provided stability and changed their perspective on life, taught them new things, influenced aspects of their education, pushed them to set higher goals and make better decisions. Many have been motivated to become mentors themselves.

Through rigorous evaluation and replication, the Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring program is nationally recognized as an Evidence-Based Practice, meaning has shown to be effective at preventing juvenile delinquency or related risk factors such as substance abuse, crime, and violence.
 
1) Youth show improvement in Social Acceptance
2) Youth show improvement in Scholastic Competence
3) Youth show improvement in Educational Expectations to graduate high school, attend and finish college
4) Youth show improvement in risk taking attitudes
5) Youth have improved relationships with parents, peers and other adults
6) Youth do not enter juvenile justice system
7) Youth feel supported by special peer/adult other than parent/sibling/other family member
8) Youth improve their grades in core subjects
9) Youth reduce rates of truancy/absenteeism
Program Long-Term Success 
1) Youth are more likely to graduate on time from high school
2) Youth are more likely to enroll in, attend and complete higher education
3) Youth are more likely to obtain gainful employment during and after college.
4)  Youth are less likely to need financial or social welfare assistance
5)  Youth are less likely to become involved in juvenile justice system
6)  Youth are more civically engaged
Program Success Monitored By 

Program outcomes are measured through case management and a variety of surveys which are administered to the Littles, Bigs, parents, and teachers on a pre/post basis.

We measure changes and improvements observed by parents and teachers in key areas, which include Confidence, Competence, Caring, and Strength of Relationship. Within these categories, short-term success is measured by a number of indicators, such as improvement in the child’s self esteem, ability to express feelings, ability to trust and feel safe with another adult, ability to have more hope for a future, improved family and peer relationships, academic performance, attitude toward school, classroom participation, homework preparedness, school behavior, and ability to avoid delinquency and high-risk behaviors.

Youth Outcome Surveys are administered to the Littles and include indicators that focus on Scholastic Competence, Academic Performance, Misconduct, Social Acceptance, Attendance, Parental Trust, and Educational Expectations.

Grades and attendance are evaluated through the collection of student report cards. We will compare attendance from the previous school year to the current school year, and grades from first to last semester of the current school year.

Mentors are surveyed to measure program satisfaction and the impact this program has on areas of their life such as; taking on responsibility, setting goals, pursuing higher education, and their relationships with their own peers and family members. 

Examples of Program Success 

Between 2004 and 2006, Private Public Ventures (P/PV) conducted a study which focused on our School-Based Program model, and found that relative to their non-mentored peers, Littles showed improvement in the following teacher reported outcomes: 

1) Overall academic performance, specifically in Science and Written and Oral Communications 
2) Quality of assignments completed
3) Number of homework and in-class assignments turned in; and 
4) Reduction in serious school infractions, including principal’s office visits, fighting and suspensions 
5) School efficacy: they felt more competent academically
6) Fewer skipped school days, which teachers also confirmed by teachers

Community-Based Mentoring

Many relationships between Bigs and Littles fall under our Community-Based programs, which is where Bigs and Littles see each other on a regular basis in the community engaging in one-to-one outings and activities, doing things they enjoy together, like: Taking a walk in the park, Going to museum, Inspiring each other, Listening to music, or just Hanging out and talking.  Most Bigs meet their Littles on the weekends. Others get together with their Littles in the evenings during the week. Each match is unique and develops a schedule that works for them.
 
The volunteer Bigs are carefully screened and trained in order to ensure child safety and relationship quality.  The youth and their families are also assessed to determine the needs of the child and preferences of the parent, so that we are able to make a match where Big and Little have similar qualities and set a foundation for a good relationship.
Budget  $1,524,969.66
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served At-Risk Populations K-12 (5-19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
After one year of being mentored between 65% and 75% of youth will show improvements in at least two of the following areas which are measured on a pre/post basis.
 
1) Social Acceptance - Child's perception of their ability to make friends and maintain strong peer to peer relationships.
2) Scholastic Competency - Child's perception of their ability to understand and complete schoolwork.
3) Educational Expectations - Child's perception of graduating on time from high school, attending college and finishing college.
4)  Risk Taking Attitudes - Child's attitudes toward smoking tobacco, drinking alcohol, taking drugs, acting out violently, skipping school.
5) Parental Relationships - Child's perception of whether parent understands and respects them.
6) Truancy - Frequency of unexcused absences.
7) Special Adult Relationships - Child's perception of having a special adult other than parent/guardian with whom they can go to to discuss problems and confide in.
8) Juvenile Justice Involvement - Child's involvement in the juvenile justice system.
9) Grades - Child's self-report of grades in core subjects: Reading, Math, Science, Social Studies, English Language.
Program Long-Term Success 

The major findings below were based on a study conducted by Wilder Research in March 2007, of youth mentoring programs, and highlight that mentoring programs can produce some of the following benefits whose values can be quantified:

1) Improved school attendance and performance – leading to increased post-secondary education, and higher lifetime earnings;

2) Reduced truancy – resulting in reduced school costs and ultimately, reduced high school dropouts and increased lifetime earnings, greater fitness and reduced healthcare costs;

3) Improved health outcomes – including reductions in teen pregnancy, reduced or delayed use of tobacco, alcohol, or illicit drugs;

4) Reduced juvenile and adult crime (both violence and property crimes) reduced costs for administrative activities of arrest, prosecution, and conviction, reduced cost of treatment and/or incarceration, reduced cost for post-treatment probation, reduces losses by the crime victims and reduced risk of crime.

5) Reduced need for social services – includes near-term costs of counseling and long-term costs of public assistance.

6) Enhanced hope for the future (reflected in increase lifetime earnings)

7) Increased workforce preparedness and self sufficiency

Program Success Monitored By 

Program evaluation is conducted through the use of several survey instruments as well as through one-to-one contact with all parties during the match supervision process.

The Youth Outcome Survey (YOS) is administered to the youth in the program on a pre/post basis (at match date and one year match anniversary date), and measures changes in the child’s perception of social acceptance, scholastic competency, educational expectations, risk attitudes, parental relationships, and grades/attendance, juvenile delinquency, and special adult relationships.

A Strength of Relationship (SOR) survey is administered to the Bigs and Littles twice a year in the first year of the match (3rd and 12th month), and annually thereafter, to effectively track match progress and increase the probability that the match can be retained and outcomes achieved. Seeing the strength of the relationship in measurable terms early in the match guides program improvements that lead to fewer premature closures of our matches. The SOR is a strong tool that measures the following relationship quality dimensions:1) Centeredness on youth’s developmental needs (Child feels emotionally supported), 2) Conflict (Absence of negative emotional experience with Big), 3) Competence (Child feels safe with Big), 4) Centrality (Child feels significance of relationship with Big), and 5) Closeness (Feelings of emotional bond and attachment toward Big).

Examples of Program Success 

Recent research has been conducted by Harris Interactive® (2009), to determine the long-term effect of mentoring by studying adults who had been mentored as children through the Big Brothers Big Sisters program. Just over half (52%) of the adults in the study grew up in single-parent homes and described their financial situation during childhood as worse off than the average American household (51%). Program Alumni reported that having a Big Brother or Big Sister in their lives positively influenced their self-confidence, provided stability and changed their perspectives on life, taught them new things, influenced aspects of their education, which motivated them to set higher goals and make better decisions. Below are highlights from the study and what researchers found when comparing non-mentored adults to mentored Alumni:

1) 42% were more likely to have received a four-year college degree.

2) 39% were more likely to have current household income of $75,000 or higher.

3) 52% were more likely to become engaged in their community.

4) A majority of adults were extremely or very satisfied with their relationships to friends (72%), family (65%) and spouses (62%).

5) 64% reported to be very satisfied with life compared to 35% of non-mentored adults.

6) 62% perceived themselves to have achieved a higher level of success than their peers not involved in the BBBS program.

7) 84% surveyed agree their experience influenced them in showing understanding to those less fortunate.


Workplace Mentoring

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County implemented the Workplace Mentoring Program 4 years ago after realizing the desire for local corporations to engage their employees in giving back to the community by providing on-site corporate mentoring  for at-risk youth in Orange County. At least once per month, local high school students are bused to a local corporation and meet one-to-one with their Bigs. This program includes one-to-one mentorship and group activities which will facilitate character building, relationship development and academic success and lasts for the entire school year for a three or four year period with one 'class'.
 
The companies we partner with include:
- BUNZL
- Disney 
- Emcor
- Hybrid 
- KPMG 
- PIMCO
- St. Jude Medical Center
- Vizio
 *Experian (Graduated Class of 2017)
The High Schools that we partner with are:
-Anaheim
-Cypress 
-Estancia 
-Katella
-Laguna Hills (2)
-Samueli Academy
-Savannah
Budget  $207,990.55
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
After one year of being mentored, 65%-75% of youth will demonstrate improvement in at least two of the following areas:
 
1) Social Acceptance
2) Scholastic Competence
3) Educational Expectations
4) Grades
5) Risk Taking Attitudes
6) Parental Relationships
7) Rate of Truancy
8) Special Adult Relationships other than parent/guardian
9) Juvenile Justice System Involvement
 
Program Long-Term Success 
1) Increased number of youth that graduate from high school
 2) Increased number of youth that attend and finish college
3) Increased number of youth that are able to obtain stable employment   
4) Increased number of youth that are civically engaged
5) Decreased number of youth that engage in high risk behaviors leading to being involved in the criminal justice / social welfare systems
Program Success Monitored By 

Program evaluation is conducted through the use of several survey instruments as well as through one-to-one contact with all parties during the match supervision process.

The Youth Outcome Survey (YOS) is administered to the youth in the program on a pre/post basis (at match date and one year match anniversary date), and measures changes in the child’s perception of social acceptance, scholastic competency, educational expectations, risk attitudes, parental relationships, and grades/attendance, juvenile delinquency, and special adult relationships.

A Strength of Relationship (SOR) survey is administered to the Bigs and Littles twice a year in the first year of the match (3rd and 12th month), and annually thereafter, to effectively track match progress and increase the probability that the match can be retained and outcomes achieved. Seeing the strength of the relationship in measurable terms early in the match guides program improvements that lead to fewer premature closures of our matches. The SOR is a strong tool that measures the following relationship quality dimensions:1) Centeredness on youth’s developmental needs (Child feels emotionally supported), 2) Conflict (Absence of negative emotional experience with Big), 3) Competence (Child feels safe with Big), 4) Centrality (Child feels significance of relationship with Big), and 5) Closeness (Feelings of emotional bond and attachment toward Big).

Examples of Program Success 
Workplace Mentoring was launched in 2013 in partnership with Pacific Investment Management Company, LLC (PIMCO) and served 30 students attending El Sol Academy.
 
Today we are partnering with 8 companies in Orange County and serving approximately 150 students attending multiple schools in Orange County: Anaheim, Cypress, Katella, Savannah, Samueli Academy, Estancia and Laguna Hills.
 
The most recent Youth Outcome Survey results showed us that the following percentages of students improved and/or remained consistent in 9 key areas.
1) 65% in Social Acceptance
2) 57% in Scholastic Competency
3) 70% in Educational Expectations
4) 67% in Overall Grades
5) 73% in Risk Attitudes Avoidance
6) 66% in Parental Trust
7) 59%  in Truancy
8) 85% in Special Adult
9) 99% in Juvenile Justice Avoidance
 
82% improved in at least two major categories.

Destination Future - 18+ Program

Destination Future 18+  helps Littles ages 13 to 25 take a proactive focus on graduating from high school and pursuing education, employment or enlistment.

Destination Future programming gives Littles access to resources for skills such as career-building and financial literacy, scholarships and apprenticeship opportunities.

1) College Campus Tours: 3 annually, financial aid & FAFSA support

2) SAT/ACT Test Prep and Tests: 2x annually, in partnership with Princeton Review

3) Financial Aid Assistance Workshops: Includes materials for parents

4) Career Exploration: Career Day in partnership with Taco Bell

5) S.T.E.M. career exploration fairs and events 

6) Destination Future Website: Career Exploration, Self-Assessments, Resume and Interview Prep, Job Search and internship placement.

7) Laptop computers for all high school graduates that attend a specific number of events and demonstrate they have been accepted to college, university or vocational school.

8) Scholarships to help defray the cost of tuition, books, and other materials.

Budget  $146,038.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Population Served At-Risk Populations Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

1) 98% high school graduation rate among Littles that are high school seniors.

2) After one year of mentoring and program participation at least 75% of participants will demonstrate improved academic performance.

3) 90% college, university, or vocational school enrollment rate.

4) 100% of students who pursue college will have access to public aid and scholarships to enable them to meet educational financial obligations.

5) 75% of participants will demonstrate improvements in one or more of the following areas: Social Acceptance, Scholastic Competence, Educational Expectations, Grades, Risk-Taking Attitudes, Parent Relationships, and Perception of having a special adult in their life.

6)  75% of youth that take the ACT / SAT will have increased scores after taking The Princeton Review Test Prep Course.
Program Long-Term Success 
1) Increase number of youth that enter and graduate from college
 2) Increased number of youth that can obtain financial aid to support college expenses
3) Increased number of youth that obtain soft skills critical to gaining successful employment
4) Increase number of youth that are able to search for and obtain gainful employment
 
Program Success Monitored By 

We will use case management records assessing the student’s access to financial aid to determine the number of students who successfully obtain financial support to enroll in college. We will administer a pre/post Youth Outcomes Survey at one year match anniversary dates, which will measure seven indicators for success. This measure has been tested and validated by experts in the mentoring field. And we will interview parents, mentors and youth to confirm college enrollment rates.

 

Examples of Program Success 
1) 98% on-time high school graduation rate
 
2) Of the graduates, 90% enrolled in college, university, or vocational school.
 
3) 30% of graduates were the first in their family to attend college
 
4) 12% received scholarships totaling $23,000+
 
5) 100% of the students attending college, stated their Big was the greatest influence in their decision to pursue higher education.
 
6) Littles were accepted to colleges such as: Eastern Michigan, CSU Fullerton, CSU Stanislaus, CSU Long Beach, Grand Canyon University, Mount Saint Mary's College, and many local community colleges.
 
7) The BBBSOC class of 2015 served 38 different high schools in our OC community
 
*Results from FYE June 30, 2015.

Management


CEO/Executive Director Melissa Beck
CEO Term Start Nov 2012
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Melissa Beck joined BBBSOC as Chief Operating Officer in November 2012, and was promoted to Chief Executive Officer in August 2013. Melissa previously served as the Executive Director for the Center for Investment and Wealth Management (CIWM) at the UC Irvine, Paul Merage School of Business.  Melissa began her career working in tax planning and preparation for professional athletes with CPA firm Zeisler, Zeisler & Rawson LLP. Melissa then served as the Controller and Director of Operations for Orion Financial Group, a private real estate investment company based in Orange County for four years before moving on to work with Merage. In addition to her Bachelors of Science in accounting and a minor in economics she has her MBA, magna cum laude from the UC Irvine Paul Merage School of Business.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Keith Rhodes Jan 2010 July 2013
Gustavo Valdespino June 2006 June 2009

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Melissa Beck Chief Operating Officer --
Chelsea Cavigli Director of Human Capital --
Allison Hata Director of Marketing & Communications --
Sloane Keane Director of Development --
Laura Marcum Director of Development --
Keith Mataya Director of Grants --
Jennifer O'Farrell Executive Director, Inland Empire

As executive director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Inland Empire, Jennifer spearheads efforts and services to combat human trafficking and prevents vulnerable youth from poverty, abuse and victimization through strategic and systematic one-to-one mentoring. Throughout her career, she has consulted, contracted with and worked for various nonprofits to ensure agency success through innovative and outcome-based measures to increase capacity and quality of programs, curriculum, services and funds.

Her leadership in the region has created pipelines and services for underserved youth to reduce child abuse, break cycles of generational poverty and increase academic attainment. She has served as president of the YWCA, founding member of The Pick Group, appointed board member to the Riverside Public Utilities, board member of San Bernardino City Unified School District’s Making Hope Happen Foundation, and the Parkview Community Hospital Foundation.

In addition, Jennifer is a past TedX Riverside speaker and has received numerous accolades from community organizations, including the 2012 Attorney General’s Award of Citizen Appreciation, 2013 Young Alumni Achievement Award from California Baptist University, 2013 Woman of the Year from the Riverside County Commission on Women, 2014 Soroptimist International Ruby Award and Soroptomist International Golden West Region Award, 2014 NAACP Community Service Freedom Award, and 2014 HOPE Collaborative Advocate of the Year Award.

Jennifer earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from California Baptist University, is a certified sexual assault counselor and advocate, graduated from the Riverside Chamber of Commerce 2010 Leadership Class and holds a philanthropy certificate from the Zapara School of Business at La Sierra University. As a wife, mother and mentor, she values the importance of community members investing in the lives of future generations to change a life and bring economic impact to the region.

Laurie Peterson Director of Accounting & Finance --
Jessica Romley Director of Site-Based Programs --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Gold Standard Award Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 2013

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
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External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 86
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 3,538
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 87%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 3
Caucasian: 17
Hispanic/Latino: 65
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 5
Other (if specified): 5 (multi-race)
Gender Female: 80
Male: 8
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

--

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Todd J Pickup
Board Chair Company Affiliation Plus Four Management
Board Chair Term Jan 2017 - Dec 2018
Board Co-Chair Todd Pickup
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Plus Four Management
Board Co-Chair Term Jan 2016 - Dec 2017

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Todd Anderson Velocity Sports Performance Voting
Timothy Andrews Allergan Voting
Doug Antone Retired Voting
Patricia Arvielo New American Funding Voting
Matt Bailey UCI Voting
Rudy Baldoni Newport Investment Associates Voting
Ellen Bancroft Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Voting
Kurt Belcher STA Jets Voting
Steve Blanc Blanc Ventures LLC Voting
Carrie Block Holstrom, Block & Parke Voting
Steve Borowski Aristotle Capital Management Voting
Erin Boyl Wells Fargo Bank Voting
Brad Coleman Brad Coleman Real Estate Voting
Tim Crosson Crossfire Voting
Brian Davis Law Offices of Brian M. Davis, APC Voting
Peter Desforges Wohl Investment Company Voting
Tom Duddy -- --
Nori Ebersole Paul, Hastings, Janofsky and Walker Voting
Chris Flick Pimco Voting
Michael Fox Towers Watson Voting
Robert Friedman Auction.com Voting
Paul Fruchbom KDF Communities Voting
Elliot Gordon Retired Voting
Steve Holley Altamont Capital Partners Voting
Cary Hyden Latham & Watkins Voting
Chris Ivey Stradling, Yocca, Carlson & Rauth Voting
Scharell Jackson Squar Milner Voting
Blake Johnson Toyota Voting
Guy Johnson Johnson Capital Voting
Edward Lieskovan Performance Research Laboratories Voting
Tracy Miller-Weiner -- Voting
Dave Moellenhoff -- --
Navin Narang First Pacific Holdings, Inc. Voting
Scott Nelson Ernst & Young Voting
Scott Nelson Ernst & Young Voting
Todd Pickup Plus Four Management Voting
Chris Reedy Reedy Asset Management, Inc. Voting
Tom Reyes -- --
Mark Rutherford First American Title Voting
Tim Ryan Anaheim Arena Management, LLC Voting
Caroline Seifert-Sabo Hines Hampton Voting
Marilyn Stemper CareerArc Group Voting
Brian Stevens Advantage Sales and Marketing Voting
Matt Stowe OctoClean Voting
Jeff Swindell The Walt Disney Company Voting
Gus Theisen Columbia Steel Voting
Kim Thompson Rutan & Tucker, LLP Voting
W. Henry Walker Farmers & Merchants Bank Voting
Gary Wilson PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 4
Caucasian: 88
Hispanic/Latino: 6
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: 0
Other (if specified): 0
Gender Female: 10
Male: 36
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 54%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 27%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

  • Audit, Compliance and Controls
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Program / Program Planning
  • Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $5,797,380 $5,121,916 $6,942,477
Total Expenses $5,321,640 $4,728,919 $4,200,277

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$4,066,186 $4,085,291 $5,364,467
Government Contributions $15,000 $54,976 $118,800
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $15,000 $54,976 $118,800
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $30,303 $0 $0
Investment Income, Net of Losses $99,867 $96,591 $72,820
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events $899,879 $854,755 $606,275
Revenue In-Kind $686,145 $407,487 $210,799
Other -- $135,990 $105,474

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $4,268,365 $3,751,988 $3,291,544
Administration Expense $474,342 $444,608 $385,579
Fundraising Expense $578,933 $532,323 $523,154
Payments to Affiliates -- $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.09 1.08 1.65
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 79% 78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 12% 11% 9%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $13,725,742 $13,175,522 $12,930,411
Current Assets $10,625,183 $9,664,476 $9,410,439
Long-Term Liabilities $7,002,826 $7,155,997 $7,296,584
Current Liabilities $637,913 $415,156 $422,455
Total Net Assets $6,085,003 $5,604,369 $5,211,372

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 16.66 23.28 22.28

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 51% 54% 56%
Endowment Value $41,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates June - June
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financial statements and Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

Annual Report (2016)

No Other Documents currently available.