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1736 Family Crisis Center

 2116 Arlington Avenue, Suite 200
 Los Angeles, CA 90018
[P] (323) 737-3900
[F] (323) 737-3993
www.1736familycrisiscenter.org
www.1736fcc.org
[email protected]
Anne O'Connor, [email protected]
FOUNDED: 1972
INCORPORATED: 1986
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Employer Identification Number 95-3989251 00001

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

The mission of 1736 Family Crisis Center is to comprehensively help children, women, men and families through crisis circumstances, including domestic violence, homelessness, abuse, neglect, poverty, substance use, post-traumatic stress disorder, and distress, and to improve their prospects for long-term housing, safety, survival, financial stability, and success.

Mission Statement

The mission of 1736 Family Crisis Center is to comprehensively help children, women, men and families through crisis circumstances, including domestic violence, homelessness, abuse, neglect, poverty, substance use, post-traumatic stress disorder, and distress, and to improve their prospects for long-term housing, safety, survival, financial stability, and success.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $12,160,000.00
Projected Revenue $12,160,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Residential Programs for Victims of Domestic Violence and Human Trafficking
  • Everychild Foundation Emergency Shelter and Youth Program
  • Domestic Abuse Response Team Program
  • Orange County Rapid Re-Housing for Homeless Veterans Program
  • Los Angeles County Veteran Families Program

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

The mission of 1736 Family Crisis Center is to comprehensively help children, women, men and families through crisis circumstances, including domestic violence, homelessness, abuse, neglect, poverty, substance use, post-traumatic stress disorder, and distress, and to improve their prospects for long-term housing, safety, survival, financial stability, and success.

Background Statement

For the past 46 years, 1736 Family Crisis Center (1736 FCC) has been a leading provider of life-saving services for children, youth and families in crisis. The organization was established in 1972 as an Emergency Youth Shelter to help homeless, runaway and abandoned girls and boys who were sleeping on local beaches. In response to growing community needs, the agency expanded to include 24-Hour Hotline and Drop-In Services offering food, clothing, counseling, and suicide intervention. In 1981, 1736 FCC's first emergency domestic violence shelter was established at a separate, confidential location. In 1984, we established one of Southern California's first clinically-focused transitional domestic violence shelters to give victims and their children licensed mental health counseling, job preparation, life-skills education, and self-confidence tools needed to build safe, independent lives. The agency incorporated as a nonprofit in 1986 and since then, has strategically expanded its programs and geographic footprint to address unmet needs of underserved populations and communities. Today, the agency operates four confidentially-located shelters for domestic violence victims and their children, two Veteran Families Programs (Orange County and Los Angeles County), an emergency youth shelter, a Legal Services Program, an employment program serving homeless Veterans and domestic violence survivors, five 24-hour crisis/suicide hotlines, and four Community Service Centers that serve low-income individuals, children and families. 1736 FCC's programs and administrative capabilities have been acknowledged by federal reviewers, including from the Youth and Family Services Bureau (U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services), as best practices in the field compared to programs nationwide. In June 2015, the Community Action Board of the City of LA recognized 1736 FCC's FamilySource Center (youth academic and family self-sufficiency services) as a top performer, with 4 out of 4 stars, for customer satisfaction, program quality and administrative excellence. In 2013-14, the Dept. of Veteran Affairs designated 1736 FCC's Director of Veteran Programs as a Program Mentor for one of its signature initiatives to end veteran homelessness nationally. As one of only 3 such designees in California that provides rapid re-housing services to very low-income Veteran families, our Director and his staff assist the VA to provide training and capacity building assistance to peer agencies in Southern California.

Impact Statement

1736 Family Crisis Center serves approximately 6,000 individuals directly through in-depth residential and nonresidential programs, and 20,000 through educational and street outreach. The agency is funded through public and private sectors, including the United States Government, State of California, Counties of Los Angeles and Orange, City of Los Angeles, surrounding municipalities, foundations, corporations, clubs and service organizations, churches, community groups, and individuals. 
 
Organizational accomplishments from the past year include the opening of a new youth shelter, housing the agency's Everychild Foundation Emergency Shelter and Youth Program; continued strengthening of the OC Veteran Families Program, with the opening of an office in Garden Grove; the continuation of vital human trafficking victim assistance funding from the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services; and the successful completion of a Housing First program for victims of domestic violence, also supported by the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services. 
 
In 2018, we continue with the programs describe above, among other long-standing programs, in service to children, youth, women and men affected by violence, abuse, sexual exploitation, and human trafficking; homeless Veterans; and low-income families. Additionally, agency advocates have served alongside LAPD-Harbor Division through the Domestic Abuse Response Team (DART) Program since 2015. In 2018, the LA Mayor's Public Safety Office has asked 1736 Family Crisis Center to replicate its services in three additional LAPD divisions -- Newton, Southeast, and Southwest Divisions.
 

Needs Statement

1) New funding to replace employment and domestic violence services funding that has been eliminated due to federal budget cuts or reallocated to serve other populations. 2) Mental health and health care services for Veterans; current funding does not cover these services and yet external, community-based resources are inadequate 3) Financial donations from the community to help us fill program gaps such as described in #2 4) In-kind donations from the community to help us continue to respond to the most basic needs of our various clients (food, clothing, etc.) 5) Volunteers

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

1736 Family Crisis Center relies exclusively on donations and grants to financially support our programs. Financial donations can be made online at www.1736fcc.org/donate.html, by phone (323-737-3900, extension 207) or by mailing a check to our administrative offices located at 2116 Arlington Avenue, Suite 200, Los Angeles, 90018. Community members can also support 1736 Family Crisis Center through the purchase of beautiful custom-designed silk ties and headbands produced in honor of the agency (Click on Project Halo link: www.1736fcc.org/donate.html).1736 Family Crisis Center accepts many types of goods and services throughout the year. Toys, printing for brochures, households goods and supplies, washing machines, beds/mattresses, sofas and other furniture - are all examples of the essential goods and services that help 1736 Family Crisis Center deliver high quality, cost-effective aid. Arrangements may be made to accept donations by calling (310) 543-9900.Volunteer opportunities include childcare, grocery shopping, meal preparation, client mentoring, professional/legal services, interns, volunteer MFT/MSW interns (therapists in training through partnerships we have with local universities), shelter beautification, outreach, and special projects. In-kind donations and volunteer opportunities are available through our Volunteer Coordinator Michele Nadeau (310-543-9900 or [email protected]).

Geographic Area Served

In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Local
North Orange County
Central Orange County
West Orange County
South Orange County
While placing no geographic limitations on the communities served, 1736 Family Crisis Center serves communities throughout Orange and Los Angeles counties, with a focus on North, East and West Orange County and South and Central Los Angeles County.

Organization Categories

  1. Human Services - Family Services
  2. Housing, Shelter - Temporary Housing
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Military/Veterans' Organizations

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Programs


Residential Programs for Victims of Domestic Violence and Human Trafficking

Our confidential, residential programs are meant to provide safe, temporary shelter for victims of domestic violence and/or human trafficking. Our free shelter services are individualized and can range from one month to one year and provide an array of services that range from providing food and clothing to long-term counseling and case management services. Our client-centered programs provide trauma-informed services that encourage self-sufficiency and long-term safety. The intensive supportive services aid victims/survivors gather the self-esteem, emotional stability, and other supports to secure and maintain employment and permanent housing. Our services are provided in English and Spanish. The program includes four confidential, 24-hour shelters (serving adults and their children ages birth through 17), five suicide/crisis hotlines, and three community service centers that provide legal assistance, employment services, case management, and mental health care to survivors.

 
Budget  $4,624,500.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Homeless Shelter
Population Served Victims Families Females
Program Short-Term Success 
During a one-year period:
1) 700 women/children will be served: 350 in shelter and 350 in outpatient services 2) 3,000 will be assisted through hotline services to find and gain access to shelter and other services to resolve their immediate crises 3) 150 survivors of violence will receive free, in-house legal services, including court representation as needed
Program Long-Term Success  1) 50% of clients in shelter (approx 350/year) will increase their income through employment and/or public benefits 2) 65% of clients in shelter (approx 350/year) will exit shelter to permanent housing 3) 85% of clients receiving mental health care (residential and outpatient) (approx 500 year) will demonstrate improvement in their mental health and ability to function, including job readiness
Program Success Monitored By  Program effectiveness is determined by measuring client progress against Individual Service Plan goals, which are developed at intake and tracked confidentially in a database. While program services are individualized, the common aim for all clients is to work toward financial stability and self-sufficiency in order to become independent of their batterers. As such, staff regularly document client progress and changes in their status, such as attainment of restraining orders, completion of mental health therapy, changes in household income, and signing of lease agreements for permanent housing. Weekly reviews are conducted by frontline staff to ensure that client service plans/activities are on track and properly documented in confidential files. When clients are accomplishing their goals, staff supports and encourages their progress. If clients are not making progress, staff will work with them to refine or revise their service plans to better serve their needs.
Examples of Program Success  Maria Martinez*, a 29 year-old single mother and domestic violence survivor with a five year-old daughter,came to 1736 Family Crisis Center to improve her life and leave a history of abuse behind. She was recommended to participate in our in-house Spanish Empowerment group. The woman expressed that she had part-time work but wanted a full-time job. After several sessions in our Spanish Empowerment group and meetings with her case manager, the client began expressing a sense of renewed confidence and ambition to move on with her life and achieve her goals. Through our employment specialist, the client was able to obtain full-time employment. The client sought additional services offered by the Domestic Violence Program; specifically free tax preparation, and obtained an Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) of $3,250 and child tax credit of $1000, both of which were refundable. This was the first time that she had received the EITC despite her prior employment and tax filings. Since receiving services the client continues to express other interests and goals. She plans on participating in Financial Literacy training and as well is excited to open a savings account. The family is doing extremely well, has achieved self-sufficiency, is living violence free, and looks forward to a very bright future. *Name changed to protect confidentiality.

Everychild Foundation Emergency Shelter and Youth Program

Licensed by the California Community Care Licensing Division, the Everychild Foundation Emergency Shelter and Youth Program addresses the immediate critical needs of homeless, runaway and abandoned boys and girls (ages 10-17) who are often victims of extreme trauma (violence at home, sex trafficking, physical assault on the streets, etc.). Central program goals are to build client coping skills and help vulnerable youth return home when appropriate, or find stable alternative living arrangements when their home is not safe. Shelter staff work with youth and their families to help each youngster develop the skills and networks of support that will lead them on paths toward safety and stability. Annually the program provides emergency shelter and supportive services to approximately 125 homeless and runaway youth, and 24-hr. crisis hotline services, outpatient care, referrals and outreach services to approximately 1,000 youth and their families.

 
Budget  $692,410.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Emergency Shelter
Population Served Homeless Victims Adults
Program Short-Term Success  125 youth (per year) will be provided with immediate access to safe shelter and rescued from victimization on the streets or at home
Program Long-Term Success  1) 90% of youth will exit the shelter to safe, stable housing through family reunification or an alternative living arrangement 2) 90% of youth will complete 6 months of aftercare activities and report using at least 2 life skills learned in shelter at 6-month follow up 3) 65% of youth in aftercare will report ongoing housing stability at 6-month follow up  

 

Program Success Monitored By  Program success is measured through the tracking of individual goals as determined in Client Service Plans, and updated on a regular basis by staff and clients. In addition, youth are provided opportunities to provide feedback on program operations through anonymous surveys as well as participation in the program's Youth Advisory Board.
Examples of Program Success  Eight months pregnant and on probation after detention in a juvenile facility for her involvement in a fight, 17-year-old Deidre entered 1736 Family Crisis Center's Emergency Youth Shelter Program with the assistance of the California Department of Children and Family Services. A volatile and abusive living situation had led to extended absences from home and incidents on the street that resulted in angry interactions with law enforcement. As well, she had a history of walking out on programs geared to troubled teens. Deidre's record included violence, arrests, and mental health issues (including attempted suicide). During her stay at our youth shelter, a staff therapist and a case manager worked closely with Deidre to address the issues and obstacles around her difficulty with anger management and identified ways that she could make her way to safety and stability for both herself and her baby: Her therapist introduced parenting skills training and assisted her with life skills training, which addressed communication (i.e., verbalizing her needs), anger and impulsivity control, and decision making processes. After completing her stay with us, Deirdre has transitioned into permanent placement with a foster family that will give her a stable and supportive environment and a future for her baby. *Name changed to protect client confidentiality.

Domestic Abuse Response Team Program

The Domestic Abuse Response Team (DART) program is a partnership between agency domestic violence advocates with specially trained LAPD Officers who respond to domestic violence 911 calls. Both the advocate and officers undergo training and have extensive knowledge to be able to provide on-scene crisis intervention and guidance and advice for victims, as well as other police officers. Currently all 21 division of LAPD have DART programs funded by the Mayor’s Office of Los Angeles. When victims gives consent, the DART advocate will either speak to the victim on the scene or will later conduct a phone call follow up to provide services and connect the victim to appropriate supportive services as needed. 1736 Family Crisis Center advocates serve in LAPD Harbor, Newton, Southeast and Southwest Divisions.

 

Budget  520,000
Category  Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Victims Females Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program Short-Term Success  During a 12-month period, 1736 FCC's DART program will 1) provide 1,400 - 2,000 DV victims and their children with on-scene and after-scene crisis intervention and follow-up services; and 2) conduct a minimum of 100 Roll Call trainings, annual in-depth training for Division police officers and sworn personnel, extensive community outreach and relationship, and at least semi-annual community educational presentations on DV related issues. 
Program Long-Term Success 
Clients served will increase their safety and knowledge of resources and victim's rights. They will gain access to education and resources to help break the cycle of violence and reduce repeat incidents and severe or lethal outcomes. They will have the ability to navigate social service and law enforcement systems, and again the confidence to prosecute their abusers.
 
LAPD police officers and community education participants will increase their knowledge of domestic violence identification and intervention, resources, domestic violence trends and laws, and best practices. 
Program Success Monitored By 
Program success is evaluated through regular reporting to the LA Mayor's Office and LAPD. These quarterly reports are filed by DART division. Additionally, the program will survey LAPD officers on the effectiveness of specialized training. The Director of Contracts & Quality Assurance manages data entry and quality control. The Training Director and Outreach Coordinator will be responsible for tracking project performance against established measures. Monthly review of project reports will enable the Director and Coordinator to identify areas for improvement, such as fewer victims accepting services than expected or the number of targeted police trainings being lower than anticipated. Identification of these issues will provide opportunity for staff to examine how changes can be made to improve performance, such as offering additional services during on-scene response or increasing (or modifying) the marketing of DV trainings to law enforcement agencies.
 
Examples of Program Success 

A recent response to a 911 call to assist a mom, Sara (victim’s name changed for confidentiality), and her young child. Once the scene was safe, the DART officer brought the 1736 advocate inside the home because Sara had agreed to speak to her. The advocate found her crying; sitting on the couch in the living room holding her baby. The advocate explained to her why she was there and how Sara could get help. Sara continued to cry while listening to the advocate and then said softly that she would have to think about going into shelter. The advocate left a brochure and business card and finished answering her questions. A few hours later, Sara called. Her mother dropped Sara and her baby off at the police station and we began her intake. Because of safety concerns related to the situation, we carefully selected a place in one of the four confidential shelters that 1736 FCC operates where they’d be safe, be able to recover, and where Sara could start a new life for herself and her child.


Orange County Rapid Re-Housing for Homeless Veterans Program

Rapid Re-Housing for Homeless Veterans Program in Orange County, focuses on providing rapid re-housing services to U.S. Veterans that have an other than honorable discharge and Reservist/National Guard. This includes Bad Conducts, Other than Honorable (OTH), and Dishonorable. The program is designed to promote the well-being of individuals who have served in the military and their families that may not necessarily qualify for regular veteran services. This is achieved though the provision of services that may include intensive case management support, medical and mental health resource referral and advocacy, benefits resource referral and advocacy, legal issues resource referral and advocacy, limited financial assistance, housing search assistance, and financial sustainability planning and referrals. Referrals are made by internal and external case managers, other public non-profit and governmental agencies as well as community based organizations.
Budget  $804,214.00
Category  Housing, General/Other Affordable Housing
Population Served Homeless Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  85% of homeless households will be assisted to move into permanent housing with their own lease agreements within 90 days of program enrollment
Program Long-Term Success  1) 90% of Veterans at risk of homelessness will avoid homelessness as demonstrated, for example, by the rescission of eviction orders 2) 85% of all enrolled will demonstrate housing stability by the end of the program, as demonstrated by consistent rent payments without program assistance
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored through a case management system that tracks individual client goals as well as program goals (housing, employment, etc.). Client feedback is collected through anonymous surveys conducted during program participation and 90 days after program participation. Survey feedback is used to inform ongoing program development and refinement.
Examples of Program Success  Natasha Taylor*, a female Veteran with a family of 5, was unemployed when she was enrolled into the Veteran Families Program. Ms. Banks has two daughters over the age of 18 and two granddaughters who are minors. The household income consisted of food stamps, unemployment benefits, and part-time employment income (from the adult daughters). Ms. Banks had fallen behind on rent for several months after depleting her savings, and received an eviction notice followed by an unlawful detainer. At the time of the final notice, she had two weeks to vacate the property. She felt completely overwhelmed and in crisis. Program staff assessed the family’s needs, developed a goal plan with Ms. Banks and jointly determined that moving to alternative housing as quickly as possible was the most appropriate course of action. Within 3 days of being referred to a Housing Specialist, the family was able to identify, apply to and get accepted for a new unit large enough to meet their needs (a 4-bedroom rental). At the same time, Ms. Banks received an acceptance offer for employment that increased the household income significantly. The family is now doing well in their new housing, with additional income through the new job and a monthly rent that is $500 cheaper than what they were previously paying. They continue to participate in case management services and are looking forward to a bright future. *Name changed for confidentiality purposes  

 


Los Angeles County Veteran Families Program

The program, which is based in Wilmington, assists military Veterans who are homeless or at imminent risk of homelessness. The overarching goal is to assist Veterans and their families achieve, or return to, housing stability and self-sufficiency, and to fill critical gaps in services by providing assistance that is not typically offered by other (veteran) programs in the county. Unlike traditional VA programs, for example, which are restricted to the Veteran herself/himself and are still largely designed for, and focused on the needs of, single male Veterans, the Veteran Families Program provides services (case management, child care, employment assistance) to female veterans as well as the children and spouses of Veterans. The program also provides flexible, temporary financial assistance to help struggling Veteran families overcome obstacles to housing stability, such as obtaining affordable child care, repairing a broken car necessary to maintain one's employment, and paying security and utility deposits on new rental units. Services are targeted to three high-risk subgroups: 1) households whose incomes are 30% and below Area Median Income; 2) veterans with minor children; and 3) post 9/11 veterans.
Budget  $1,334,000.00
Category  Human Services, General/Other Services for the Homeless
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Homeless
Program Short-Term Success  85% of homeless households will be assisted to move into permanent housing with their own lease agreements within 90 days of program enrollment
Program Long-Term Success  1) 90% of Veterans at risk of homelessness will avoid homelessness as demonstrated, for example, by the rescission of eviction orders 2) 85% of all enrolled households will demonstrate housing stability by the end of the program, as demonstrated by consistent rent payments without program assistance
Program Success Monitored By  Program success is monitored through a case management system that tracks individual client goals as well as program goals (housing, employment, etc.). Client feedback is collected through anonymous surveys conducted during program participation and 90 days after program participation. Survey feedback is used to inform ongoing program development and refinement.
Examples of Program Success  --

Management


CEO/Executive Director Ms. Carol Adelkoff
CEO Term Start 1984
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience Ms. Adelkoff has served as CEO/Executive Director of 1736 FCC since 1984. Under her leadership, 1736 Family Crisis Center has grown from a single Emergency Youth Shelter to an internationally recognized provider of professional shelter, treatment and prevention services for troubled children, youth, families, and Veterans. Ms. Adelkoff has consistently identified emerging community needs and guided the agency in developing programs to meet them, touching more than 25,000 people a year. Ms. Adelkoff is an active advocate, having been elected chair or member of various local task forces and advisory boards (e.g., County of Los Angeles Domestic Violence Council; Advisory Board of Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority). She has provided consultation to state and federal offices and elected officials regarding domestic violence and other pertinent subjects.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Ms. Debbie Nelson Senior Director of Clinical Programs and Services --
Ms. Tobi Quintiliani Senior Director of Community Response and Relations --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Congressional Recognition of Excellence Award U.S. Congress, Office of Karen Bass 2015
Four Star Community Service Award Community Action Board (City of Los Angeles) 2015
Four Star Community Service Award Community Action Board (City of Los Angeles) 2013
Four Star Community Service Award Community Action Board (City of Los Angeles) 2012

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
OC Partnership 2015
OC Partnership 2014
OC Partnership 2013

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

1736 Family Crisis Center partners with more than 150 nonprofit organizations and public agencies throughout LA and Orange counties, believing firmly in the principle that no single organization can comprehensively address the multi-faceted needs of persons in need. For example, we intentionally co-locate our Orange County Veteran Families Program with complementary service providers to provide a coordinated, integrated continuum of services to Veterans in need and reduce common barriers to accessing care. Program staff co-locate in Santa Ana at the county's only veteran-specific resource center, and work alongside professionals from Veterans First, the VA, PTSD Support Group, Social Security Administration, Orange County Health Care Agency, and the Department of Social Services. Program staff provide services that these other agencies do not have the capacity or resources to provide (e.g., assistance with child care, help with rent, etc.), and link enrolled Veterans with services provided by partner agencies that we do not provide (temporary shelter; PTSD therapy; etc.). In addition to providing services at the one-stop center, we proactively outreach to other service providers countywide that also serve Veterans in order to collaborate and to facilitate access to care.

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 85
Number of Part Time Staff 65
Number of Volunteers 200
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 96%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 38
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 12
Caucasian: 49
Hispanic/Latino: 51
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 136
Male: 14
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Management Succession Plan Yes
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan Yes

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

Mental Health Care/Facilities

Substance Abuse Treatment Services/Facilities

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Mr. Robert C Smith
Board Chair Company Affiliation R.E. Smith & Associates
Board Chair Term May 2018 - Apr 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ms. Carol Adelkoff CEO and Executive Director, 1736 Family Crisis Center NonVoting
Mr. Wendell Barner Berkshire Hathaway Voting
Mr. Terry Eddy International Code Council, Senior Vice President, Human Resources (Retired) Voting
Ms. Ernestine Frazier -- Voting
Ms. Renate Hild Retired, Westchester/LAX Chamber of Commerce Voting
Mr. Robert E Smith R.E. Smith & Associates Voting
Mr. Alex Steinberg Steinberg and Foster Voting
Mr. Ron Troupe Retired, University of Redlands, Board of Trustees Voting
Ms. Cozette Vergari Vergari & Associates Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 5
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 5
Male: 4
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 4
Board Term Limits 4
Board Meeting Attendance % 100%
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

--

Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Development / Board Orientation
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Finance
  • Human Resources / Personnel

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Revenue $12,160,000.00
Projected Expenses $12,160,000.00
Form 990s

2017 1736 FCC Form 990

2016 1736 FCC Form 990

2015 1736 FCC Form 990

2014 1736 FCC Form 990

Audit Documents

2017 1736 FCC Audited Financials

2016 1736 FCC Audit

2015 Audited Financials

2014 Audited Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $10,935,254 $9,359,447 $10,454,675
Total Expenses $10,561,416 $9,351,417 $9,281,380

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$882,440 $572,137 $2,040,578
Government Contributions $9,790,163 $8,558,701 $8,409,436
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $9,790,163 $8,558,701 $8,409,436
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- $0
Earned Revenue -- -- $0
Investment Income, Net of Losses $19 $112 $233
Membership Dues -- -- $0
Special Events -- -- $0
Revenue In-Kind $262,632 $228,497 $203,239
Other -- -- $4,428

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $9,497,555 $8,328,427 $8,220,616
Administration Expense $965,070 $870,560 $913,557
Fundraising Expense $98,791 $152,430 $147,207
Payments to Affiliates -- -- $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.04 1.00 1.13
Program Expense/Total Expenses 90% 89% 89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 1% 2% 1%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $8,197,250 $7,958,674 $7,792,819
Current Assets $4,647,234 $4,375,046 $5,020,741
Long-Term Liabilities $1,158,929 $1,194,037 $942,602
Current Liabilities $1,660,802 $1,760,956 $1,854,566
Total Net Assets $5,377,519 $5,003,681 $4,995,651

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.80 2.48 2.71

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 14% 15% 12%
Endowment Value $130,882.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.