Share |

CHUCK JONES CENTER FOR CREATIVITY

 3321 Hyland Avenue
 Costa Mesa, CA 92626
[P] (949) 386-7504
[F] (949) 660-8815
chuckjonescenter.org
chuckjones.org
[email protected]
Robert Patrick
FOUNDED: 1999
INCORPORATED: 2013
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 45-2982522 --

Summary


--

Mission StatementMORE »

Our vision is a world where creativity is known and experienced in every discipline including science, technology, math, engineering and the arts. Our mission is to inspire creativity via the unique philosophies and creative genius of legendary animator and founder, Chuck Jones. The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is a “gymnasium for the brain” that fosters creative thinking, the thinking behind problem solving, through creativity exercises. Creativity is like a muscle in your brain that needs exercise. The stronger it is, the better it works. But creativity is waning … the brain is not being sufficiently exercised. Creative activities at the Center address this gap. Creativity means a brighter future for youth. Creativity helps people find jobs – businesses of all sizes are seeking employees with the ability to think creatively. Unfortunately, California schools continue to eliminate funding for arts education. Children don’t have the chance to develop creative abilities, impacting their ability to reach their full potential after graduation. The arts promote healthy aging. Evidence demonstrates that creative exercises improve the brain health of older people; reducing the advancement of dementia and helping seniors live independently. Creative activities benefit children on the autism spectrum. Our programs facilitate connections with others, use visual art as a form of non-verbal communication and increase tolerance to stimuli.


 

Mission Statement

Our vision is a world where creativity is known and experienced in every discipline including science, technology, math, engineering and the arts. Our mission is to inspire creativity via the unique philosophies and creative genius of legendary animator and founder, Chuck Jones. The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is a “gymnasium for the brain” that fosters creative thinking, the thinking behind problem solving, through creativity exercises. Creativity is like a muscle in your brain that needs exercise. The stronger it is, the better it works. But creativity is waning … the brain is not being sufficiently exercised. Creative activities at the Center address this gap. Creativity means a brighter future for youth. Creativity helps people find jobs – businesses of all sizes are seeking employees with the ability to think creatively. Unfortunately, California schools continue to eliminate funding for arts education. Children don’t have the chance to develop creative abilities, impacting their ability to reach their full potential after graduation. The arts promote healthy aging. Evidence demonstrates that creative exercises improve the brain health of older people; reducing the advancement of dementia and helping seniors live independently. Creative activities benefit children on the autism spectrum. Our programs facilitate connections with others, use visual art as a form of non-verbal communication and increase tolerance to stimuli.


 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2018
Projected Expenses $108,400.00
Projected Revenue $121,225.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Public School Outreach
  • Boys & Girl Scouts Badge Round-Ups
  • Food for Thought - Adult Brain Health
  • Milestones - Autism Spectrum
  • Community Events

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

Our vision is a world where creativity is known and experienced in every discipline including science, technology, math, engineering and the arts. Our mission is to inspire creativity via the unique philosophies and creative genius of legendary animator and founder, Chuck Jones. The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is a “gymnasium for the brain” that fosters creative thinking, the thinking behind problem solving, through creativity exercises. Creativity is like a muscle in your brain that needs exercise. The stronger it is, the better it works. But creativity is waning … the brain is not being sufficiently exercised. Creative activities at the Center address this gap. Creativity means a brighter future for youth. Creativity helps people find jobs – businesses of all sizes are seeking employees with the ability to think creatively. Unfortunately, California schools continue to eliminate funding for arts education. Children don’t have the chance to develop creative abilities, impacting their ability to reach their full potential after graduation. The arts promote healthy aging. Evidence demonstrates that creative exercises improve the brain health of older people; reducing the advancement of dementia and helping seniors live independently. Creative activities benefit children on the autism spectrum. Our programs facilitate connections with others, use visual art as a form of non-verbal communication and increase tolerance to stimuli.


 


Background Statement

Founded in 1999 by Chuck Jones – the legendary animator who gave life to Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote and Bugs Bunny – The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity is a 501(c)3 public charity located in Orange County, CA. Chuck Jones, four-time Academy Award-recipient, was a creative genius who gave life to over 300 animated films as a director at Warner Bros. Animation Studio. Chuck's passion is reflected in our vision – to inspire innate creativity by using the innovative philosophies of Chuck Jones, leading to a more successful life and innovative community. Linda Jones Clough, Chuck’s only child, has been an integral part of the Center from the very beginning. Marian Jones, Chuck’s widow, has also played a key role in the evolution of the Center from its fledgling stage. Upon the passing of Chuck Jones in 2002, the mantle of leadership for the Center was taken up by Craig Kausen – Chuck’s grandson. He continues to serve as Chairman of the Board, Acting Executive Director and the keeper of the Chuck Jones legacy. Our vision and mission has remained the same for nearly 18 years. To better reflect our focus, the name was changed to the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity in 2003. To better protect the invaluable assets and ephemera of Chuck Jones, the Chuck Jones Museum was separated from the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity in 2013. (The original tax EIN was retained by the Chuck Jones Museum.) The Center has the rights (subject to the trademark and copyright provisions of Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc.) to use these amazing resources for our events. Film festivals showcasing these beloved characters bring an inestimable amount of awareness to the work of the Center across the nation. The “What’s Up, Doc?” exhibit (produced by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services) has been seen by tens of thousands over the last 3 years – bringing smiles to all and serving as an ambassador for his namesake philanthropic organization.

 


Impact Statement

Our programs build important life skills for school age children, support healthy cognitive abilities for seniors and enhance behavioral function for children on the autism spectrum. We offer both one-time programs and several different multiple-session workshops at our Center – along with schools and other community locations – across the four local counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Diego. While we sometimes charge a nominal fee to offset the direct expenses, we strive to minimize the cost and serve youth that might otherwise not be able to afford these meaningful experiences. The Center reached 8,000 participants in 2015 (an increase of 50% over 2014) and 12,000 in 2016 (another 50% increase). In 2016, we reached over 17,000 people through our work. Through museum exhibitions and unique events, we reached over 35,000 additional participants over the last 3 years. Our long-term goal is to expand these enterprises outside southern California to communities around the country. We have already launched our first venture outside the area in Schaumburg, Illinois. We are also creating a business plan through our participation in the UCLA Social Enterprise Academy to launch  a new and unique program targeting 14-17 year-olds with the goal of reducing our dependence on donations and sponsorships. Further, we have expanded our offering from one-time events to a program series that increased our ability to capture returning participants.
Some of our valued collaborators are Huntington Beach City School District, Irvine Public School Foundation, Bonita Canyon After-Class Enrichment, Girls Scouts of America, the Muckenthaler Cultural Center Middle School STEAM Program, Autism Resource Mom, the Orange County Vital Brain Aging Program at Hoag Hospital, the Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Rising Above Disabilities (RAD) Camp.


 


Needs Statement

Our top 5 most pressing needs listed along with estimates of the associated costs are: (1) Executive Director Recruitment and Hire: estimated cost of $60,000 per year. (2) Board Recruitment and Development Consultant: estimated cost of $1000 per month for 6 months. (3) Volunteer Management and Recruitment: our plan is to recruit a volunteer with experience in the development and implementation of a volunteer program, so the costs will only be staff time for training and a laptop computer. (4) Executive Director & Fund Development Director: estimated at $75,000 to $85,000 annual salary plus benefits for each full-time position. (5) Marketing Manager: to foster effective use of social media platforms, customer engagement and ongoing web site management. Estimated total of $65,000 to $75,000 annually for full-time salary and benefits.


CEO Statement

My grandfather’s passion was encouraging and inspiring each person to be their best within their chosen discipline. The purpose of the  Center is to stimulate the creative spark within everyone, especially young people, through our  programs using the films, drawings, and writings of Chuck Jones as inspiration. There is a concept called a “beginners mind”, meaning openness, eagerness, a joyful lack of preconceptions when studying a subject, even at advanced levels. Chuck talked about this – about how children between 4 and 7 all do beautiful painting and drawing, unless they are told “no”. He said, “Self-expression is one of the pressure valves to normalcy in a world heavy with restrictions. As adults we learn to live with our inhibitions – but a stifled child is an indictment of such a society. To the extent a child loses confidence in his ability, to that extent is the likelihood of doing any creative work or creative thinking diminished.” Sir Ken Robinson put it this way: “Imagination is the source of every form of human achievement. And it’s the one thing that I believe we are systematically jeopardizing in the way we educate our children and ourselves.” The Center encourages the “beginner’s mind” – the freedom to color outside the lines, to think outside the box, to regard mistakes as possibilities, to explore new ways of thinking for all ages and all levels. Society increasingly recognizes the benefits of creativity in the technical fields of science, engineering and math to the wider world of industry. As more people are empowered with the freedom to create without expectations or limitations, the Center believes there will be a wave of innovation in individual lives and the world will change. As psychologist, physician and widely read author Dr. Edward De Bono put it: “There is no doubt that creativity is the most important human resource of all. Without creativity there would be no progress, and we would forever be repeating the same patterns.” To create these new patterns, Chuck wrote, “The artist must be accident-prone … must stumble, then get up and not walk away, for that is when it happens. Stumbling is the unexpected event that corresponds to a mutation in genetics. It is the mutation of creativity. Without it, we would continue to do only those expected things the experts so adore. Without stumbling, we wouldn’t have gotten into the Stone Age – much less out of it. And we would have missed a lot of laughs.” Stumbling and laughter. It’s a journey we all can take with the Center as joyful guide.


 


Board Chair Statement

As the grandson of Chuck Jones, the founder of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, I have inherited his passion for our work – to inspire each person to be their best within their chosen field or endeavor. Positioning and communicating the importance of creativity to success for all walks of life creates its own challenges – particularly to grant funders and corporate sponsors that are inundated with requests from organizations trying to meet basic human needs. Although there are many published studies by reputable sources, it is becoming increasingly necessary to provide specific documentation that proves the tangible benefits of our programs on our three primary target demographics – youth without access to arts education, seniors, and children on the autism spectrum. Within the bounds of our limited funds, we have implemented a three-pronged strategy with the support of our Board of Directors: (1) Engaged an expert resource in August of 2017 to provide pro bono development of a brand strategy. (2) Decrease our dependence on donations by increasing our focus on social enterprise programs that deliver a consistent source of earned income. (3) Internal development of a “creativity test” as a start to measure both subjective and objective impact of our programs on the participants. However, these strategies will only take us so far without additional funding from new sources. The critical success factor to improve fund development is a healthy, engaged Board of Directors that operates from a philosophy of philanthropy. We are in a transition from a group of original Board members that were Chuck’s personal connections to a more diverse group with connections that will facilitate our fund development efforts – through personal giving and network connections to other potential funding sources. In June of this year, our Board approved an initiative to attract the next generation of Board members. In addition, we are actively seeking other appropriate individuals to recruit. Again, these efforts are important but will not get us to the ideal Board configuration. Funds permitting, we are hoping to engage an experienced consulting resource that will develop the initial strategy for implementation by the Chairman of the Board along with the Executive Director.

 


Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

How can you get involved with the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity? Participate in one of our programs. Join out volunteer team. Become a community creativity sponsor. Support us with a tax-deductible contribution. For more information, email [email protected] or call 949-660-7793.

Geographic Area Served

Central Orange County
West Orange County
South Orange County
North Orange County

In addition to serving all of Orange County, we also serve the communities of Riverside and San Diego counties through our network of teaching artists and collaborations with other non-profit organizations. We are also expanding to areas outside California through a train-the-trainer model.

Organization Categories

  1. Arts,Culture & Humanities - Arts Education
  2. -
  3. -

--

Programs


Public School Outreach

Richly designed after school programs, built around various forms of art making. With a total of over 50 lesson plans, each program is available individually as well as in a customizable series of 6 or 8 week sessions – such as “Exercise Your Genius”, “Paint Like Picasso”, “Be A Junior Animator” & “Let’s Have Fun Cartooning”. We also collaborate with schools to complement their Enrichment Day activities during various holidays. Our Master’s Program travels to schools, introducing students to the work of Chuck Jones through lecture and film clips; students are then taught his technique of combining shapes as they learn how to draw Bugs Bunny.
Budget  $67,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Our success is measured by conducting a creativity assessment before and after each class that evaluates four key aspects of creativity - fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration. The assessment is scored by our lead teaching artist and the change in each aspect is calculated. 

Program Long-Term Success  The impact of creativity exercises is often not observed until years later. Retrospective studies to document the specific impact of our programs would be complex and extremely costly. However, there is a growing body of evidence from highly respected sources on the impact of creativity exercises. A bibliography is available upon request.
Program Success Monitored By  Our success is monitored by a short survey to assess the participants experience with each question measured on a scale of one to five.
Examples of Program Success  --

Boys & Girl Scouts Badge Round-Ups

Monthly, multi-troop workshops promote socialization by gathering many troops (Brownie, Junior & Cadette levels) together to earn a merit badge relating to creative problem solving and the visual arts that meets the specific requirements for each badge – such as Cadette Comic Artist, Brownie ACME Inventor, Cadette Book Artist & Brownie Painting.
Budget  $67,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program Short-Term Success 

Our success is measured by conducting a creativity assessment before and after each class that evaluates four key aspects of creativity - fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration. The assessment is scored by our lead teaching artist and the change in each aspect is calculated. 

Program Long-Term Success  The impact of creativity exercises is often not observed until years later. Retrospective studies to document the specific impact of our programs would be complex and extremely costly. However, there is a growing body of evidence from highly respected sources on the impact of creativity exercises. A bibliography is available upon request.
Program Success Monitored By  Our success is monitored by a short survey to assess the participants experience with each question measured on a scale of one to five.
Examples of Program Success  --

Food for Thought - Adult Brain Health

Being creative causes the brain to reshape, adapt, and restructure – improving cognitive function and serving as a strong defense against Alzheimer's disease. This 8 week program is designed to exercise memory, executive function, visual function and association through creative projects to provide exceptional cognitive exercise. The two-hour sessions are “Time Capsule Collage”, “Metamorphosis”, “The Art of the Doodle”, “Creating Calm”, “ACME Inventions”, “Pictures Tell 1000 Words”, “Notar” and “Paper Bending”.
Budget  $67,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program Short-Term Success 

Our success is measured by conducting a creativity assessment before and after each class that evaluates four key aspects of creativity - fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration. The assessment is scored by our lead teaching artist and the change in each aspect is calculated.

Program Long-Term Success  The impact of creativity exercises is often not observed until years later. Retrospective studies to document the specific impact of our programs would be complex and extremely costly. However, there is a growing body of evidence from highly respected sources on the impact of creativity exercises. A bibliography is available upon request.
Program Success Monitored By  Our success is monitored by a short survey to assess the participants experience with each question measured on a scale of one to five.
Examples of Program Success  --

Milestones - Autism Spectrum

Art offers a non-verbal language for people with autism to express themselves. This 8-week program teaches techniques that allow students to visually articulate their thought process while tapping into their imagination. The sessions are “The Art of the Doodle”, “Tulpa and Splatter Creatures”, “Painting to Music”, “Underwater Adventure Collaborative Mural”, “A Creature Like Me”, “Paper Bending”, “Collaborative Chuck Jones Character Mural”, ACME Inventors”. Quarterly Creativity Workshops for families and their children are also offered to facilitate the formation of connections with peers, foster cooperation and offer support to families.
Budget  $67,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Under development.
Program Long-Term Success  The impact of creativity exercises is often not observed until years later. Retrospective studies to document the specific impact of our programs would be complex and extremely costly. However, there is a growing body of evidence from highly respected sources on the impact of creativity exercises. A bibliography is available upon request.
Program Success Monitored By 

Our success is measured by conducting a creativity assessment before and after each class that evaluates four key aspects of creativity - fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration. The assessment is scored by our lead teaching artist and the change in each aspect is calculated.

Examples of Program Success  Our success is monitored by a short survey to assess the participants experience with each question measured on a scale of one to five.

Community Events

Our free community events inspire young artists who would not otherwise receive art instruction. “Drop In & Draw” teaches children how to draw characters like a pro. “Creative Classrooms” are a unique venue for parents and their children featuring a recognized literary/artistic speaker that inspires the creative genius of participants through lecture and a related creativity exercise. Chuck Jones Big Draw is a customized, creative experience for large groups from school districts and other not-for-profit organizations with a specific theme. We also provide activities at other community events – such as Newport Beach Art in the Park, Costa Mesa Actions Arts in the Park, Balboa Island Art Walk, OC Make-A-Wish and Festival of Children.
Budget  $67,500.00
Category  Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 

Our success is measured by conducting a creativity assessment before and after each class that evaluates four key aspects of creativity - fluency, flexibility, originality and elaboration. The assessment is scored by our lead teaching artist and the change in each aspect is calculated.

Program Long-Term Success  The impact of creativity exercises is often not observed until years later. Retrospective studies to document the specific impact of our programs would be complex and extremely costly. However, there is a growing body of evidence from highly respected sources on the impact of creativity exercises. A bibliography is available upon request.
Program Success Monitored By  Our success is monitored by a short survey to assess the participants experience with each question measured on a scale of one to five.
Examples of Program Success  --

Management


CEO/Executive Director Craig Kausen
CEO Term Start Sept 2014
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Craig Kausen – grandson of legendary Looney Tunes animation film-maker, Chuck Jones – is not only one of the art industry’s most visionary entrepreneurs but is the passionate voice for the importance of creativity in every aspect of life. Following graduation from UCLA in 1985 with a degree in computer engineering, he worked at Hughes Aircraft and taught computer engineering and computer science at the college level. Subsequently, he attended the prestigious Strategic Leadership Institute at UCLA’s Anderson School of Business. In early 1991, he joined his mother at the company she founded and led the development of the Chuck Jones Galleries into a thriving fine art gallery business. In 2003, he took the helm of the company as President and CEO. He has lectured and taught for and about the art industry over the past two decades across the country. Craig is a founder and the current Chairman of the Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. The Center is a place to unleash the creative spark in everyone, serving individuals from childhood to their golden years through a wide range of unique creativity experiences based on Chuck Jones’s unique philosophies of education while incorporating his well-loved films, characters, writings and art.


 

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Cyndi Burgess Program Manager --
Denise Dion-Scoyni Lead Teaching Artist & Program Developer --
Robert Patrcik Marketing & Fundraising Events Director --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

Some of our valued collaborators are Huntington Beach City School District, Irvine Public School Foundation, Bonita Canyon After-Class Enrichment, Girls Scouts of America, the Muckenthaler Cultural Center Middle School STEAM Program, Autism Resource Mom, the Orange County Vital Brain Aging Program at Hoag Hospital, the Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Rising Above Disabilities (RAD) Camp.

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 20
Number of Contract Staff 10
Staff Retention Rate % 70%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: --
Asian American/Pacific Islander: --
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: --
Native American/American Indian: --
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 3
Male: 1
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Under Development
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency No N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

--

CEO Comments

Did you know that we all have the capacity to be a creative genius, like the legendary Chuck Jones?  Chuck was the legendary artist who gave life to Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote & Bugs Bunny, along with over 300 animated films, and who continues to provide laughter to all of us.  The Center is proud of our work with disadvantaged youth, local schools without art programs, those on the autism spectrum, seniors dealing with dementia, university researchers and corporate clients. Through our cost-effective network of trained teaching artists, over 80% of funds raised in 2016 went to direct support of our innovative programs and allowed us to reach more than 17,000 people across Southern California. However, we can’t do it without your help. As a 501(c)3 charity, we rely on the generous support of people like you. Please consider making a tax-deductible contribution today to The Chuck Jones Center for Creativity, so that we can continue helping people of all ages to “exercise your genius!”

Foundation Comments

--

Governance


Board Chair Craig Kausen
Board Chair Company Affiliation Linda Jones Enterprises
Board Chair Term Sept 2013 - Sept 2019
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Fernando del Rosario Art Institute of California--Orange County Voting
Marian Jones Retired Exofficio
Linda Jones Clough Founder, Linda Jones Enterprises & Daughter, Chuck Jones Voting
Alex Kausen Jones Family Companies Voting
Jessica Kausen Jones Family Companies Voting
Ben Olson 3 Monkeys & Aardvark Studios: Director, Chicagoland CJCC Voting
Mike Smith Founder, Beardboy Productions Voting
Andrew Turner Turner Law Firm Voting
Michael Wedaa Ocean Capital Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
Jeff DeGrandis Animator NonVoting
Rob Minkoff Film Director & Animator NonVoting
John Ramirez Animation Artist & Rose Parade Float Designer NonVoting

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 8
Hispanic/Latino: 1
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 2
Male: 7
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 75%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 100%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

In addition to serving as the Chairman of the Board, I am also the acting Executive Director – both as a volunteer. Beyond 3 part-time staff members, everything else is also done by volunteers – including accounting and human resources. While this is a short-term bridge, it is not sustainable in the long-term. Our strategic needs are articulated in the “Statement from the Board Chair/President” section. From an operational perspective, our most significant limiting factor is funding to grow both full time and part time staffing. Our opportunities to expand the reach of the Center for Creativity reach into the community and beyond are greater than ever – but we need the staff to do it successfully. For example, we have interested potential partners that want to launch satellite locations around the country. There are other individuals associated with the arts that would love to do “pop-up” creativity experiences. Our second challenge is the need to establish systems and processes to make organization more effective as well as efficient. This will enable us to keep our staff as lean as possible. Thanks to their nonprofit program, we have already been able to implement Salesforce.com to manage our donor and participant database. There is a workflow function that would be a great tool to map and monitor other processes – such as volunteer recruitment, new teacher training, new program development – but we do not have the people resources to accomplish this goal.
The specific positions and the estimated costs are identified in our “Needs Statement”.

Foundation Comments

--

Standing Committees

  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Marketing
  • Program / Program Planning

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2018 to Dec 31, 2018
Projected Revenue $121,225.00
Projected Expenses $108,400.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $151,996 $136,806 $87,076
Total Expenses $133,927 $121,407 $99,025

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$31,145 $23,272 $21,288
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue $120,851 $113,534 $21,544
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- $44,244
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $129,136 $103,807 $81,806
Administration Expense $4,309 $15,927 $17,219
Fundraising Expense $482 $1,673 --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.13 1.13 0.88
Program Expense/Total Expenses 96% 86% 83%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 2% 7% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $34,348 $8,644 $12,867
Current Assets $27,245 $4,919 --
Long-Term Liabilities $8,293 -- --
Current Liabilities -- $658 $20,280
Total Net Assets $26,055 $7,986 $-7,413

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities inf 7.48 0.00

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 24% 0% 0%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

CEO Comments

--

Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.