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Partners in Health A Nonprofit Corporation

 800 BOYLSTON ST STE 300
 BOSTON, MA 02199
[P] (425) 260-3329
[F] --
https://www.pih.org/
[email protected]
Scott Garrepy
FOUNDED: --
INCORPORATED: 2002
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 04-3567502 00000

Summary



Mission StatementMORE »

We go. We make house calls. We build health systems. We stay.

Our mission is to provide a preferential option for the poor in health care. By establishing long-term relationships with sister organizations based in settings of poverty, Partners In Health strives to achieve two overarching goals: to bring the benefits of modern medical science to those most in need of them and to serve as an antidote to despair.

We draw on the resources of the world’s leading medical and academic institutions and on the lived experience of the world’s poorest and sickest communities. At its root, our mission is both medical and moral. It is based on solidarity, rather than charity alone.

When our patients are ill and have no access to care, our team of health professionals, scholars, and activists will do whatever it takes to make them well—just as we would do if a member of our own families or we ourselves were ill. 

Mission Statement

We go. We make house calls. We build health systems. We stay.

Our mission is to provide a preferential option for the poor in health care. By establishing long-term relationships with sister organizations based in settings of poverty, Partners In Health strives to achieve two overarching goals: to bring the benefits of modern medical science to those most in need of them and to serve as an antidote to despair.

We draw on the resources of the world’s leading medical and academic institutions and on the lived experience of the world’s poorest and sickest communities. At its root, our mission is both medical and moral. It is based on solidarity, rather than charity alone.

When our patients are ill and have no access to care, our team of health professionals, scholars, and activists will do whatever it takes to make them well—just as we would do if a member of our own families or we ourselves were ill. 


FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $149,000,000.00
Projected Revenue $132,700,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Research at PIH
  • Maternal Health at PIH
  • Mental Health

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

We go. We make house calls. We build health systems. We stay.

Our mission is to provide a preferential option for the poor in health care. By establishing long-term relationships with sister organizations based in settings of poverty, Partners In Health strives to achieve two overarching goals: to bring the benefits of modern medical science to those most in need of them and to serve as an antidote to despair.

We draw on the resources of the world’s leading medical and academic institutions and on the lived experience of the world’s poorest and sickest communities. At its root, our mission is both medical and moral. It is based on solidarity, rather than charity alone.

When our patients are ill and have no access to care, our team of health professionals, scholars, and activists will do whatever it takes to make them well—just as we would do if a member of our own families or we ourselves were ill. 


Background Statement

Partners In Health (PIH) was founded in 1987 to support a one - room health clinic serving a destitute squatter settlement in rural Haiti. PIH’s founders believed the conditions in the settlement — the crushing poverty, absence of modern health care and pervasive poor health — were not inevitable. These were social conditions subject to human intervention and so could be changed — in Haiti or anywhere in the world. In the three decades since, having served millions of patients across four continents, created thousands of jobs and transformed global health, the work of Partners In Health has proved our founders right.

Impact Statement

Building to Zero: We’ve set our four top-line clinical priorities in direct response to the pain we encounter in the places we work. Meeting it head-on—within a proven model of community-centered care—offers a way to make good on the promises that medicine made possible decades ago, but has yet to deliver to half the planet.
 
ZERO preventable maternal deaths in childbirth Every day, 800 women die in pregnancy or childbirth from preventable causes. The solution lies in meeting truly elemental needs: prenatal advice, safe delivery facilities, skilled birth attendants—all core elements of our maternal care platform.
 
ZERO mother-to-child HIV transmission Sixteen percent of children born to women living with HIV become infected even though a simple and effective way to prevent transmission has been available since 1994. We can expand testing and treatment to every pregnant woman we see.
 
ZERO childhood malnutrition deaths In this era of abundance, a basic lack of food remains a direct or underlying factor in the deaths of 3 million children every year—all of them younger than five. At our sites, feeding kids is often an essential first step in emergency care.
 
ZERO tuberculosis deaths Though treatable since 1949, TB recently leapfrogged HIV to become the world’s deadliest infectious disease. Our cure rates are among the highest anywhere— even for the most drug-resistant cases—and can be replicated everywhere. 

Needs Statement

1. Universal Health Care Coverage in the countries where we work
2. Neo/Child Maternal Health -- ensuring mothers deliver their babies in hospitals and that babies receive the healthcare services they need in their first few days of life
3. Innovation/Technology  -- employing new tools and practices to increase effectiveness and efficiency in healthcare delivery
4. Capital Renewal -- making sure our hospitals, clinics, medical equipment, ambulances, and other buildings/tools are kept in good working order to serve patients
5. Education -- Training the next generation of global health workers through our University of Global Health Equity in Rwanda  
 
PIH's expense in 2017 were $147.5M -- our programs were 90% of the overall budget, meaning PIH's overall program expense was $132.75M. 

CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

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Geographic Area Served

South Orange County
 Haiti, Rwanda, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Peru, Mexico, Russia, Sierra Leone and Navajo Nation

Organization Categories

  1. Health Care - Community Health Systems
  2. -
  3. -

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Programs


Research at PIH

Research at PIH

From clinical trials of tuberculosis treatment in Kazakhstan, Lesotho, and Peru to multi-year studies of HIV treatment in Rwanda and groundbreaking cholera vaccination projects in Haiti and Sierra Leone—to name just a few efforts—Partners In Health, or PIH, has been leading, facilitating, and conducting applied medical research for decades, through large-scale, collaborative projects around the world.

The core of PIH’s mission, to bring the benefits of modern medical science to the world’s most vulnerable populations, relies on the generation of new knowledge through rigorous research that raises the global discussion about health care delivery, improves that delivery, and comprehensively strengthens health systems in the world’s poorest settings.


Budget  $147.5M
Category  Health Care, General/Other Rural Health Services
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  EndTB aims to enroll at least 2,600 patients in 17 countries on new TB drugs, while closely documenting the drugs’ effectiveness and safety, by 2019. The partnership had enrolled nearly 1,400 patients across 15 countries as of September 2017.
Program Long-Term Success 

Global Approach

The Global Health Delivery Partnership, for example, was formed with these goals firmly in mind. The partnership reflects PIH’s strong ties with Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the partnership’s other founding members. Many PIH staff hold academic appointments at those institutions. The partnership enables PIH to leverage academic and clinical resources to research complex health issues, closely monitor existing and new interventions, utilize new data to improve clinical services, and, ultimately, set new standards of care for underserved populations. The partnership’s strategic priorities for 2014-19 focus on addressing the burden of disease and gaps in delivery in the 10 countries in which PIH works, while strengthening health care workforces and building a foundation of data to aid implementation.

Another partnership that exemplifies PIH’s commitment to research is Expand New Drugs for TB, or endTB, which began in 2015 to foster innovation in places where multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is deadliest. The $60.4-million project is being conducted by PIH; Médecins sans Frontières; Interactive Research & Development, a global health delivery group; and financial partner Unitaid, a World Health Organization partnership that invests in the international fight against TB, HIV, and malaria.

In short, PIH’s research projects inform the adoption and implementation of best practices, and build effective tools for health systems delivery and strengthening in resource-limited settings. Research findings also demonstrate the effectiveness of PIH’s programs to potential donors, and are used to advocate for policy change at the national and international levels.

Program Success Monitored By 
Please see a recent artcile published about our progress:  
https://www.pih.org/article/pih-making-strides-against-tb-stigma-kazakhstan
Examples of Program Success 

Maternal Health at PIH

Pregnancy and childbirth pose major risks of disability or death for millions of women in the developing world who lack access to basic health care. Each year in Rwanda and Malawi, for example, one woman out of every 200 who delivers a baby will die in pregnancy or childbirth, compared to one out of 3,600 in the United States.

Family planning is one proven method for safeguarding women’s health. Women familiar with contraception are more likely to delay childbearing and have fewer children, thus reducing their risk for obstetrical complications. Yet women in poor communities all too often lack access to contraception. Clinics are too far away, fees are too high, and transportation costs are beyond their means. If contraception were available, maternal mortality in poor countries could be reduced by as much as one third.

Prenatal and obstetric care often lag as well. Each year in developing countries, just a little more than half of pregnant women receive the recommended amount of prenatal care, and a quarter of all births occur without help from a skilled birth attendant. This is true despite the fact that potentially fatal complications occur in 15 percent of births.

Mother-to-child transmission of HIV continues to be a concern in resource-poor countries. A simple and effective treatment for prevention of transmission has been available since 1994, yet 16 percent of children born to women living with HIV still become infected each year.

Budget  $147.5M
Category  Health Care, General/Other International Public Health/International Health
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program Short-Term Success  6,000 C-sections performed in 2017 as well as 1,000,000 women's health visits, family planning visits and deliveries each year. 
Program Long-Term Success 

artners In Health strives to address these inequalities by expanding access to women’s health services in the countries where we work. We provide access to family planning, medical care for pregnancy and childbirth, and antiretroviral treatment for pregnant women living with HIV.

In Haiti, all our clinics have a nurse trained in sex education and reproductive health counseling. Staff members have offered free condoms and contraception for more than 15 years. We have trained community health workers who specifically teach about HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, while they promote family planning and women’s health. This successful model is being replicated at our sites in Rwanda, Malawi, and Lesotho.

Meanwhile, obstetrician/gynecologists and midwives in Haiti ensure that high-quality care for pregnancy, childbirth, and related complications is always available. At Rwinkwavu Hospital in rural Rwanda, specialized nurses are trained in prenatal counseling and delivery as well as family planning. And in Lesotho, our community health workers educate and accompany pregnant women to health centers, ensuring they receive care from skilled health professionals.

For more than 20 years, we have provided antiretroviral treatment to HIV-positive pregnant women in rural Haiti. The HIV infection rate of newborns delivered at our clinics rivals the rates in developed countries. This program has since been expanded to Rwanda, Malawi, Lesotho, and Russia.

Program Success Monitored By 
# of facility based births
 
In 2016 alone, PIH/ZL-supported services averted the deaths of about 1,000 women across PIH/ZL’s entire catchment area  
 
In 2016, PIH-supported maternal health care services saved the lives of around three women every day 
 
Examples of Program Success  --

Mental Health

The World Health Organization estimates that untreated mental disorders account for 13 percent of the total global burden of disease, and that by 2030, depression alone will be the leading cause of disability around the world—outpacing heart disease, cancer, and HIV.

Almost half the world’s population lives in countries where, on average, there is one psychiatrist to serve 200,000 or more people. And it’s likely that in these places people are poor and suffer other diseases, which can create and worsen mental health problems. They might also have lived through wars or natural disasters. To make matters worse, stigma against disorders such as depression, schizophrenia, bipolar, and epilepsy often goes unchecked, discouraging people from seeking care and sometimes leading to inhumane treatment.

Budget  $147.5M
Category  Health Care, General/Other International Public Health/International Health
Population Served People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program Short-Term Success  Please see above for short and long term successes. 
Program Long-Term Success 

PIH’s response

Our mental health programs are delivering care and growing at nearly all of our global sites. Given common co-morbidities between mental health and other areas—HIV, tuberculosis, noncommunicable disease, cancer, substance abuse, domestic violence, and poverty—our priority is to make mental health care a central part of our primary care package across our sites and systems.

Soon after Haiti was struck by a devastating earthquake in 2010, PIH began building a system for mental health care to serve an area of 1.3 million people. Over the past three years, we have created a community-based model that is integrated into our primary care system in rural Haiti—11 hospital sites in the country’s Central Plateau and Artibonite departments.

In Rwanda, the focus of our mental health program has been a health center nurse training model called MESH (Mentoring and Enhanced Supervision at Health Centers). The work focuses on providing affordable, community-based care in the public primary care system, and increases the use of effective treatments of non-specialists through the mentorship program. 

In Peru, we work in Carabayllo, one of the poorest districts of the capital city, Lima, where we have been a global leader in modeling community-based approaches to successful treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Our mental health program has evolved from a strong psychosocial program for patients living with tuberculosis, to delivering care for depression, and developing safe houses for people living with psychotic illness.

In Mexico, we serve 10 clinics staffed by pasantes (physicians) and acompañante (community health workers). The pasantes receive ongoing monthly trainings on best clinical practices, mental health diagnosis, and treatment. The acompañantesprovide basic psychoeducation, monitor treatment adherence, and refer patients to care. Eudeli Velasquez is one such acompañante. 

We are developing mental health programs in Navajo Nation, Malawi, Lesotho, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Russia. In partnership with the Program in Global Mental Health and Social Change and the Dr. Mario Pagenel Fellowship in Global Mental Health Delivery at Harvard Medical School, PIH is building platforms for the delivery of safe, effective, evidence-based and culturally sound mental health services across its sites.

Program Success Monitored By  Please see above for success factors. 
Examples of Program Success  --

Management


CEO/Executive Director Dr. Gary Gottlieb
CEO Term Start 2015
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience

Dr. Gary L. Gottlieb is the CEO of Partners In Health. From 2010 until February of 2015, he served as president and CEO of Partners HealthCare, the parent of the Brigham and Women’s and Massachusetts General Hospitals, operating the largest health care delivery organization in New England and among the nation’s largest nonprofit biomedical research and training enterprises. Dr. Gottlieb is a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. He served as president of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, as president of North Shore Medical Center, and as chairman of Partners Psychiatry. Prior to coming to Boston, Dr. Gottlieb spent 15 years in positions of increasing leadership in health care in Philadelphia. As a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, he earned an M.B.A with distinction in health care administration from the Wharton Graduate School of Business Administration. Dr. Gottlieb established the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center’s first program in geriatric psychiatry and developed it into a nationally recognized research, training, and clinical program. He served as executive vice-chair of psychiatry and associate dean for managed care at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, and as director and CEO of Friends Hospital in Philadelphia. Dr. Gottlieb received his M.D. from the Albany Medical College of Union University in a six-year accelerated biomedical program. He completed his internship and residency and served as chief resident at New York University/Bellevue Medical Center. As a leader in the Boston area community, Dr. Gottlieb serves as chairman of the board of directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
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Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
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Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
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Affiliations

Affiliation Year
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External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 16,000
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % --
Staff Professional Development --

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: --
Asian American/Pacific Islander: --
Caucasian: --
Hispanic/Latino: --
Native American/American Indian: --
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: --
Male: --
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? --
Organization has Strategic Plan? --
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy --
Whistle Blower Policy --
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? --
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency -- --
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency -- --
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency -- --

Government Licenses

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CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Ophelia Dahl
Board Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Chair Term -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Ophelia Dahl -- --
Paul Farmer -- --
Gary Gottlieb -- --
Todd McCormack -- --

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 4
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 1
Male: 3
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria --
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy --
Percentage of Monetary Contributions --
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Board Orientation --

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year July 01, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Projected Revenue $132,700,000.00
Projected Expenses $149,000,000.00
Form 990s

2017 PIH 990 Form

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

Audit Documents

2017 Financials

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $129,400,244 $109,067,193 $186,945,813
Total Expenses $145,464,654 $145,222,483 $121,630,141

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$87,513,408 $77,347,532 $151,278,793
Government Contributions $30,647,126 $30,334,450 $35,203,832
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified $30,647,126 $30,334,450 $35,203,832
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- $0 $0
Earned Revenue $797,374 $89,968 $24,000
Investment Income, Net of Losses $796,840 $470,474 $175,340
Membership Dues -- $0 $0
Special Events -- $0 $-1,155
Revenue In-Kind $8,997,289 $6,481,636 $21,556,373
Other $648,207 $302,047 $231,672

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $131,556,026 $131,525,227 $111,303,263
Administration Expense $8,679,347 $9,498,340 $5,071,318
Fundraising Expense $5,229,281 $4,198,916 $5,255,560
Payments to Affiliates -- $0 $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.89 0.75 1.54
Program Expense/Total Expenses 90% 91% 92%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 4% 4% 3%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $71,791,952 $77,882,363 $104,786,293
Current Assets $36,492,561 $41,413,372 $97,933,294
Long-Term Liabilities -- $0 $0
Current Liabilities $21,281,602 $11,243,582 $4,935,194
Total Net Assets $50,510,350 $66,638,781 $99,851,099

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 1.71 3.68 19.84

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% 0%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? --
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financial statements and Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.