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Santa Catalina Island Conservancy

 320 Golden Shore, Suite 220
 Long Beach, CA 90802
[P] (562) 4378555 x 1228
[F] --
www.catalinaconservancy.org/
[email protected]
Suzanne Gardner
FOUNDED: 1972
INCORPORATED: 2015
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA --
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 23-7228407 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

Founded in 1972, the Santa Catalina Island Conservancy's mission is to serve as a responsible steward of our lands through a balance of conservation, education, and recreation. As one of the oldest and largest land trusts in California, we protect nearly 90% of Catalina Island (42,000 of 48,000 acres), which is home to 60+ plants and animals found nowhere else in the world.

Mission Statement

Founded in 1972, the Santa Catalina Island Conservancy's mission is to serve as a responsible steward of our lands through a balance of conservation, education, and recreation. As one of the oldest and largest land trusts in California, we protect nearly 90% of Catalina Island (42,000 of 48,000 acres), which is home to 60+ plants and animals found nowhere else in the world.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $10,548,903.00
Projected Revenue $11,017,181.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Conservation Programs
  • Education Programs
  • Recreation Programs
  • Trailhead Visitor Center

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

Founded in 1972, the Santa Catalina Island Conservancy's mission is to serve as a responsible steward of our lands through a balance of conservation, education, and recreation. As one of the oldest and largest land trusts in California, we protect nearly 90% of Catalina Island (42,000 of 48,000 acres), which is home to 60+ plants and animals found nowhere else in the world.

Background Statement

Our core programming is described below:

Conservation: We’re a leader in conservation programs that protect, restore, promote the sustainable use of natural resources for present/future generations. Our conservation efforts have been in partnership with some of the most dedicated conservation managers, scientists, and volunteers. Through these partnerships, we have established our Wildlife Conservation and Management Program and Catalina Habitat Improvement and Restoration Program (CHIRP), which includes native plant conservation and restoration projects and invasive plant removal projects. Through these programs/projects, the Conservancy has achieved the following milestones: 1) brought back the endangered and endemic Catalina Island Fox from the brink of extinction; 2) helped to reintroduce bald eagles to the skies above Catalina; 3) removed thousands of invasive plants that were choking-out native Island chaparral populations; 4) monitored plant and animal populations to proactively address signs of disease and distress; and 5) discovered new, endemic plant species, creating a seed bank at our Ackerman Native Plant Nursery.

Education: We’ve provided environmental education to disadvantaged K-12 youth, families, and adults for 30+ years as part of ongoing efforts to cultivate the next generation of stewards of the Island/Earth. We’re committed to preparing Avalon’s predominantly socio-economically disadvantaged student population for entry into Catalina’s largest industry (eco-tourism) and/or higher education in Science, eco-tourism, or conservation fields through our NatureWorks Programs and Sub-Programs. NatureWorks is aligned with Common Core Standards, STEM curricula and, Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). We currently offer: NatureWorks (in classroom, K-12); Kids in Nature (K-5th grades, after-school program); Island Scholars (4-6th grades); Course Catalina (6-8th grades); Rose Ellen Gardner Internship (9-12th grades); Job Shadow Week (11-12th grades); Summer Naturalist Program (post high school-college); Naturalist Training (18+); and Families in Nature (serving local Catalina families).

Recreation: Our commitment to accessibility allows active recreation on Catalina, making it the most accessible of the Channel Islands. We offer many opportunities to explore Catalina’s interior, including biking, hiking (on 165+ miles of trails and roads), camping, and Eco/Wildlands Express tours.


Impact Statement

In 2018, the Conservancy was able to reach 333,624 unduplicated individuals through its ongoing programs/services. Programmatic accomplishments from 2018 are summarized below:

• 2,279 acres were surveyed by CHIRP
• 385 Islands Foxes were trapped, vaccinated, and examined for overall health. To date, the population has reached a total of 1,570 foxes.
• 110 Bison are on the Island
• 4,866 native plants were grown and maintained
• 90,518 campers camped on the Island
• 8,873 student interactions were made with Conservancy staff through Education programming
• 3,066 Avalon and mainland LA County students and residents were served through NatureWorks programming
• 15,684 hikers hiked Catalina’s trails
• 24,254 visitors were welcomed in the Conservancy House (guest services)
• 23,800 visitors were welcomed in the Nature Center at Avalon Canyon (education department/programming)
We have reached the final stages of the IMAGINE CATALINA campaign, and are currently working to close an existing $935,492 funding gap to close the campaign and complete the Trailhead Visitor Center. The Trailhead is a an initiative of our IMAGINE CATALINA long-term strategic plan, which imagines how we can evolve, advancing our expertise, experience, and resources to serve Catalina and a greater good beyond its shores. The Trailhead underpins all three areas of our mission – conservation, recreation, and education – and will expand our accessibility and impact.
Since launch of the campaign, the Conservancy has achieved the following:
• Reached 95% of overall campaign funding goals. We have raised more than $16.9M toward the IMAGINE CATALINA goal of $17.9M through full (100%) support from our Board of Directors, individual donors, and several prominent Los Angeles County foundations, including Ahmanson, Annenberg, Rose Hills Foundation, Southern California Edison, and S. Mark Taper Foundation, among several others;
• Completed Trekking Catalina: Master Trails Program in 2017, expanding our trails system by 27 miles, and adding seven eco-friendly waterless restrooms and a large-scale, fully equipped, volunteer campsite.
• Received a $100,000 grant award from the Offield Family Foundation to use toward West End habitat restoration planning; and
• Continued to progress towards the completion of Trailhead construction, which began in June 2016.


Needs Statement

The Conservancy’s most pressing needs continue to focus on securing funding for our ongoing programming, along with final funding to complete the Trailhead. There is currently a $935,492 funding gap. We also need funding for vast infrastructure needs. Our work in caring for the majority of the Island can be compared to running a municipality without a tax base, including maintenance of roads, bridges, an airport, Native Plant Nursery, vehicles, and other heavy equipment, etc.
Education Programs (NatureWorks Programs and Sub-Programs), including: NatureWorks (in classroom, K-12), Kids in Nature (K-5th grades, after-school program, Island Scholars (4-6th grades), Course Catalina (6-8th grades), Rose Ellen Gardner Internship (9-12th grades), Job Shadow Week (11-12th grades), Summer Naturalist Program (post high school-college), Naturalist Training (18+), Families in Nature (serving local Catalina families)
Conservation Programs/Projects: Fox Recovery Program, Flora of Santa Catalina Island and Field Guide, Catalina Habitat Improvement & Restoration Program (CHIRP), Vegetation Mapping, Tree Mortality Project, Hydrologic Monitoring, Water Reliability Study, Solar/Wind/Water Technologies exploration


CEO Statement

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Board Chair Statement

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Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Make a donation: Your gift will help the Conservancy keep Catalina wild and accessible through programs such as removing highly invasive plants, maintaining a healthy Island fox population and educating thousands of visitors and young people about the Island’s ecology and natural history. Gifts of cash, stock or other assets can be put to work at the Conservancy. Unrestricted gifts are particularly helpful because they can be directed to where they are most urgently needed. Become a member: Your membership will help save animal species on the verge of extinction, protect and restore rare and endangered habitats, and support experiential ecological literacy education programs. Current membership levels: Friend: $35.00 Explorer: $65.00 Adventurer: $125.00 Conservationist: $250.00 Discoverer: $500.00 Naturalist: $1,000.00 Aeroclub: $115.00 Corporate Partners: Become a corporate partner by sponsoring one of our annual events or ongoing programs, volunteering as a team on Island, or through in-kind donations. Conservancy Corporate Partners are important environmental leaders in protecting and restoring Catalina for the more than one million annual visitors who come to the Island every year. Leadership Circle: Join this special membership group for exclusive access to private Island tours and special member events. Leadership Circle involvement begins at a $2,500 annual support level. Matching Gifts: Many companies offer employees a matching gift benefit that, in effect, doubles (or in many cases even triples) your gift to the Conservancy. Give to a Project: To make a donation toward any of the Conservancy's programs or projects, you can donate online (see button below). Simply designate the project or program you wish to support by choosing it from the Donation Category drop-down list on the online form. Or, you can specify a program on your check and mail it to: Catalina Island Conservancy, 320 Golden Shore, Suite 220, Long Beach, CA 90802.

Geographic Area Served

North Orange County
Central Orange County
West Orange County
South Orange County

As an international tourist destination, Catalina welcomes over one million local, national, and international visitors of all ages annually. This includes all Orange County residents.

Organization Categories

  1. Environment - Land Resources Conservation
  2. Education - Educational Services
  3. Recreation & Sports - Camps

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Programs


Conservation Programs

We’re a leader in conservation programs that protect, restore, and promote the sustainable use of natural resources for present/future generations. Our conservation efforts have been in partnership with some of the most dedicated conservation managers, scientists, and volunteers. Through these partnerships, we have established our Wildlife Conservation and Management Program and Catalina Habitat Improvement and Restoration Program (CHIRP), which includes native plant conservation and restoration projects and invasive plant removal projects.

Budget  3,000,000
Category  Animal-Related, General/Other Wildlife Preservation & Protection
Population Served Other Named Groups
Program Short-Term Success 
Short-term successes vary by program. In 2018, the following program outcomes were achieved (these are reflective of some, but not all, of our current Conservation programs, as space limitations limit our response):
• 2,279 acres were surveyed by the Catalina Habitat Improvement and Restoration Program (CHIRP), which includes native plant conservation and restoration projects and invasive plant removal projects.
• 4,866 native plants were grown and maintained
• 1,570 Catalina Island Foxes are on the Island (385 of these were trapped, vaccinated, and given health checks).
• 110 Bison are on the Island, and the Conservancy continues to work to minimize the size and impact of Catalina’s Bison population.
Program Long-Term Success 

The Conservancy has achieved the following milestones in its 46-year history: 1) brought back the endangered and endemic Catalina Island Fox from the brink of extinction; 2) helped to reintroduce bald eagles to the skies above Catalina; 3) removed thousands of invasive plants that were choking-out native Island chaparral populations; 4) monitored plant and animal populations to proactively address signs of disease and distress; and 5) discovered new, endemic plant species, creating a seed bank at our Ackerman Native Plant Nursery.

Most recently, the Conservancy was able to reunite a Catalina Island Fox pup with her mother after nearly two weeks of separation. After Conservancy biologists and our local veterinarian nursed the abandoned pup back to health, it was deemed healthy and strong enough to return to her family. Wildlife Biologists will continue monitoring the pup’s family group for the next several months to ensure that the reintroduction was fully successful, and that similar efforts can be carried-out in the future.

 
Program Success Monitored By  Each of our ongoing programs has specifically defined evaluation strategies and outcomes, ensuring our ability to determine overall effectiveness. For example, Fox and Bison population control efforts focus on the achievement of target numbers representing ideal population sizes of each group. CHIRP effectiveness is measured by number of acres surveyed, acres treated for invasive plant species, and measureable changes in vegetation mapping
Examples of Program Success 

Short-term successes vary by program. In 2018, the following program outcomes were achieved (these are reflective of some, but not all, of our current Conservation programs, as space limitations limit our response):
• 2,279 acres were surveyed by the Catalina Habitat Improvement and Restoration Program (CHIRP), which includes native plant conservation and restoration projects and invasive plant removal projects.
• 4,866 native plants were grown and maintained
• 1,570 Catalina Island Foxes are on the Island (385 of these were trapped, vaccinated, and given health checks).
• 110 Bison are on the Island, and the Conservancy continues to work to minimize the size and impact of Catalina’s Bison population.
Continued vegetation mapping in partnership with USC, CSULB, and the California NPS.

Education Programs

The Conservancy is committed to preparing Avalon’s sizable socio-economically disadvantaged student population for entry into Catalina’s largest industry (eco-tourism) and/or higher education off the Island in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM), conservation, or similar fields through its NatureWorks Education Program. NatureWorks is a multifaceted educational program focused on increasing ecological literacy among K-12 learners. Connected with Long Beach Unified School District’s (LBUSD) Common Core Standards, STEM curricula, and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (https://bitly.im/0t83j), the program emphasizes hands-on investigation/experiences aligned with the work of science researchers, naturalists, and others to provide authentic pathways to increase STEM related knowledge. These programs provide increased access to environmental education, with the goal of better preparing Avalon/mainland students to pursue higher education and/or careers in ecotourism, STEM, or related fields and inspiring an appreciation for the natural world. 

NatureWorks Education programming focuses on K-12 youth, and most programs are offered in partnership with schools, teachers, and afterschool programs. However, many learners of all ages also connect with our other Complementary Programs on weekends, evenings, and during the summer months. These programs, including our Summer Naturalist Program (Post High School‐College), Families in Nature (local families), and Naturalist Training (18+), allow us to provide lifelong science education and even more science experiences for youth during out of school hours.

 
 
 

Budget  1,000,000
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) Adults
Program Short-Term Success 
• Providing multiple, free access points for learners of all ages to experience hands-on science instruction and first-hand exposure to the natural world.
o 80% of grade levels at Avalon School will receive science enrichment programming provided by our Education Department.
• Improving student understanding of scientific tools, processes, and research methods.
o 80% of program participants will have the opportunity to use scientific tools and/or processes for science learning (e.g. binocular use, scientific illustration, field surveys, etc.).
o 80% of program participants will experience increased understanding of the work of science researchers.
• Increasing learner awareness of the unique natural history of Catalina.
o 80% of program participants will demonstrate increased science content knowledge related to Catalina.
• Providing learners with opportunities to increase skills related to career awareness and/or workplace readiness.
o 90% of work readiness program participants (e.g. Summer Naturalists; Job Shadow Week participants) will demonstrate new knowledge and/or a new skill that better prepares them for the workplace.
• Inspiring appreciation for the natural world
o 80% of program participants will report positive feelings toward nature in post-program measures.
Program Long-Term Success 
Our long-term goals include expanding the reach of NatureWorks, while also increasing the program’s depth:
• Expand program offerings so that 80% of Avalon school grade levels have access to a science enrichment program
• Expand program offerings to serve more youth and adult learners from mainland communities
• Expand our evaluation plan so that we can continue to make data-driven decisions on program design and improvement
• Create sharable inquiry-centered STEM lessons that will be available free of charge online to support educators in schools and informal institutions, connecting learners to quality science education

Each of our NatureWorks programs and Complementary programs has a unique focus. Combined, they provide a comprehensive suite of learning opportunities for learners of all ages. Some programs focus on content gains, while others focus on career awareness and workplace readiness. Our overarching NatureWorks goals and corresponding anticipated short-term outcomes are included below:

Program Success Monitored By 

Each of our Education programs has a unique evaluation plan tailored to measure its individual goals and objectives. Evaluation efforts utilize a range of data collection and analysis methods. Examples include pre-post questionnaires, lesson plan analysis, retrospective questionnaires, instructor observations, participant self-reflections, work-sample analysis, document review, and attendance metrics.



Examples of Program Success 

A recently completed evaluation demonstrated that Natureworks programs were effectively meeting these goals. The future holds continued development of evaluation efforts that are specifically tailored to each program model. Dr. Melber has been conducting program evaluation for nearly 20 years, with special emphasis on measuring the impact of informal science education programs.


Recreation Programs

Our commitment to accessibility allows active recreation on Catalina, making it the most accessible of the Channel Islands. We offer many opportunities to explore Catalina’s interior, including biking, hiking (on 165+ miles of trails and roads), camping, and Eco/Wildlands Express tours.

Budget  3,000,000
Category  Recreation & Sports, General/Other Public Parks & Recreational Trails
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success 
In 2018, some of the following successes were reported (space limitations limit our response):
• 90,518 campers camped on the Island
• 15,684 hikers hiked Catalina’s trails
• 24,254 visitors were welcomed in the Conservancy House (guest services)
• 23,800 visitors were welcomed in the Nature Center at Avalon Canyon (education department/programming)
Program Long-Term Success 

The Conservancy’s commitment to accessibility allows active recreation on Catalina, making it the most accessible of the Channel Islands. We are unique in that we believe in, and promote, the concept of a lived landscape – we work to ensure that Catalina is not only preserved, maintained, and stewarded, but also, easily accessible and enjoyed by all visitors and residents. We offer many opportunities to explore Catalina’s interior, including biking, hiking (on 165+ miles of trails and roads), camping, and Eco and Wildlands Express tours – which allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of conservation in a lived landscape.

Program Success Monitored By  Success is monitored via annual activity reporting. 
Examples of Program Success 
In 2018, some of the following successes were reported (space limitations limit our response):
 
• 90,518 campers camped on the Island
• 15,684 hikers hiked Catalina’s trails
• 24,254 visitors were welcomed in the Conservancy House (guest services)
• 23,800 visitors were welcomed in the Nature Center at Avalon Canyon (education department/programming)

Trailhead Visitor Center

The Trailhead will be a 9,000+ square foot building that is highly visible/accessible, located minutes from the Cabrillo Mole boat landing — greatly increasing our presence/exposure to a larger majority of Catalina’s 1M annual visitors. A multi-level building, the Trailhead will include roof decks, a gallery, a mission-related retail store, a small café, and meeting and event spaces. It will serve as the beginning point for Island adventure, including information regarding guided hiking and biking tours, and will offer learning experiences about Catalina’s history, ecology, and geology.

Budget  15,000,000
Category  Environment, General/Other Environmental Education
Population Served General/Unspecified
Program Short-Term Success  Immediate/short-term success will be achieved once fundraising goals are reached and construction is complete. Anticipated opening is March 2019.
Program Long-Term Success 
The Trailhead will:
• Provide annual access to 700,000+ visitors (or a larger majority of Catalina’s annual 1M visitors);
• Provide a portal for learning about Catalina’s ecology/natural history through Eco/Wildlands Express Tours, the Wrigley Memorial & Botanic Garden, the Nature Center, and the Airport in the Sky, and hiking, camping, and biking opportunities;
• Increase the reach of formal/informal education programming through conservation and education programs (including NatureWorks), lectures, exhibitions, and interpretive displays;
• Serve as a model of environmental sustainability as Avalon’s first LEED certified building, featuring a building management system to determine energy efficiency and demand response, rainwater collection systems, a photovoltaic system on roof surfaces, and salt water flush toilets;
• Increase awareness regarding methods of engagement; and
• Increase unrestricted revenues, up to $307,000 annually.
Program Success Monitored By 

Anticipated success of the Trailhead is outlined in our visitor and profit projections, which are based on professional forecaster and actual data from similar retail stores on Catalina. These projections indicate that the Trailhead will be self-sustaining, growing our financial resources through increased unrestricted revenues – up to $300,000+ annually.

Examples of Program Success 

The Trailhead will:
• Provide annual access to 700,000+ visitors (or a larger majority of Catalina’s annual 1M visitors);
• Provide a portal for learning about Catalina’s ecology/natural history through Eco/Wildlands Express Tours, the Wrigley Memorial & Botanic Garden, the Nature Center, and the Airport in the Sky, and hiking, camping, and biking opportunities;
• Increase the reach of formal/informal education programming through conservation and education programs (including NatureWorks), lectures, exhibitions, and interpretive displays;
• Serve as a model of environmental sustainability as Avalon’s first LEED certified building, featuring a building management system to determine energy efficiency and demand response, rainwater collection systems, a photovoltaic system on roof surfaces, and salt water flush toilets;
• Increase awareness regarding methods of engagement; and
• Increase unrestricted revenues, up to $307,000 annually.


Management


CEO/Executive Director Tony Budrovich
CEO Term Start --
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience
Tony Budrovich joined the Conservancy in 2015. After leading the Conservancy’s team as Chief Operating Officer for one year, he was named President and CEO in June 2016. He has 18+ years of experience serving as Deputy Director of the California Science Center and Senior Vice President of the California Science Center Foundation, where he was responsible for 350 staff, 150 volunteers, and all operations. Among Tony’s many accomplishments at the California Science Center, he oversaw all construction projects for Phase II of the Science Center’s Master Plan, including: Ecosystems, a new permanent exhibition wing, and the Samuel Oschin Air and Space Center, which will house its most popular exhibit, the Space Shuttle Endeavour. As CEO of the Conservancy, he currently manages 81 staff, and works closely with the executive team, including the Chief Development Officer, Chief of Finance and Business Development, Director of Conservation, Director of Education, Manager of Human Resources, and Administrative/Government Relations Manager and Senior Executive Assistant. Tony also works closely with a 13 member Board of Directors and four Benefactor Members in governance of our organization.

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
Ann Muscat -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
Michelle Badders Manager of Human Resources --
Tony Budrovich President and CEO Tony Budrovich joined the Conservancy in 2015. After leading the Conservancy’s team as Chief Operating Officer for one year, he was named President and CEO in June 2016. He has 18+ years of experience serving as Deputy Director of the California Science Center and Senior Vice President of the California Science Center Foundation, where he was responsible for 350 staff, 150 volunteers, and all operations. Among Tony’s many accomplishments at the California Science Center, he oversaw all construction projects for Phase II of the Science Center’s Master Plan, including: Ecosystems, a new permanent exhibition wing, and the Samuel Oschin Air and Space Center, which will house its most popular exhibit, the Space Shuttle Endeavour. As CEO of the Conservancy, he currently manages 81 staff, and works closely with the executive team, including the Chief Development Officer, Chief of Finance and Business Development, Director of Conservation, Director of Education, Manager of Human Resources, and Administrative/Government Relations Manager and Senior Executive Assistant. Tony also works closely with a 13 member Board of Directors and four Benefactor Members in governance of our organization.
Cynthia Fogg Administrative and Government Relations Manager/Senior Executive Assistant --
Suzy Gardner Chief Development Officer
Suzy Gardner joined the Conservancy in 2016, bringing 15+ years of experience in the business and nonprofit fields. She oversees fundraising, communications, marketing, and membership programs, along with events and other development activities. Prior to joining the Conservancy, she led development teams for several human services organizations and worked as a major gift officer in higher education. Before serving in these nonprofit leadership roles, she worked in the for-profit world in procurement for Pellerin Milnor Corporation and publicly traded Plexus Corporation in Wisconsin. She holds bachelor’s degrees in accounting and psychology, as well as a master’s degree in nonprofit management from Regis University.
Dr. Bill Giuliano Director of Conservation --
Tim Kielpinski Chief Operating Officer Tim Kielpinski joined the Conservancy in 2016, bringing extensive operations and facilities management experience. Prior to joining the Conservancy, he served as the Assistant Deputy Director of Operations at the California Science Center where he lead a staff of 80 and provided oversight and management of construction projects and all operations. Currently, Tim oversees the Conservancy’s general operations, including the Airport in the Sky, capital projects, facilities, guest and volunteer services, rangers, and safety programs. He is a West Point Graduate, and former army captain and company commander.
Larry Lloyd Chief Financial and Business Development Officer
Larry Lloyd joined the Conservancy in 2012. He guides all of the Conservancy's financial matters, from accounting and reporting, to budgets, tax returns, and development of new mission-related business opportunities. He has had a long and varied career, including positions in public accounting at KPMG and corporate planning and strategy for large publicly traded companies. He has also previously served as Treasurer and Board Member for the Taco Bell Foundation for Teens. Larry obtained a bachelor’s degree in business administration from University of Southern California (USC), and a Master of Business Administration (MBA) in finance from Pepperdine University.
Dr. Leah Melber Director of Education --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
Tourism Steward of the Year Award CalTravel Summit Annual Awards 2018

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
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External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
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Collaborations

We are a leader in conservation/education programs that protect, restore, and promote the sustainable use of natural resources for present and future generations. These programs are executed by experienced conservation and education staff in conjunction with many community partners, including but not limited to, the Institute for Wildlife Studies, Cal State University Long Beach, University Southern California Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies, Long Beach Unified School District and ABC Unified School District.

Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 77
Number of Part Time Staff 13
Number of Volunteers 628
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate % --
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 66
Hispanic/Latino: 21
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): 2
Gender Female: 45
Male: 44
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? --
Organization has Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 14
Management Succession Plan No
Organization Policies And Procedures Yes
Business Continuity of Operations Plan No

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy No
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? Yes
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency Yes Annually

Government Licenses

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CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Kellie Johnson
Board Chair Company Affiliation President Ace Clearwater Enterprises
Board Chair Term -
Board Co-Chair Patrick McAlister
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation Investment/Financial Adviser/ President of Harold J. McAlister Family Foundation
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
William Hagenah -- Voting
Shaun Tucker -- Voting
Blanny Avalon Hagenah -- Voting
Robert Breech Past Sr. VP of David E Kelly Productions Voting
Stephen Chazen -- Voting
Roger Chrisman Co-founder Network Equipment Tech Voting
John Cotton Retired President of Bay Harbor Management Voting
Trevor Fetter -- Voting
Terry Grill Director, Sustainability, Sealed Air Coporation, President/CEO, Industrial Insulations Incorp Voting
Hank Hilty Chairman of the Board, President and CEO of A.F. Gilmore Company Voting
Kellie Johnson -- Voting
Roger Lang -- Voting
Patrick McAlister -- Voting
Anthony Michaels -- Voting
Calen Offield -- Voting
Maria Pellegrini -- Voting
Geoff Rusack -- Voting
Victoria Seaver Dean -- Voting
D. Scott Stuart -- Voting
Mike Sullivan -- Voting
Alison Wrigley Rusack -- Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 0
Caucasian: 100
Hispanic/Latino: 0
Native American/American Indian: 0
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 29
Male: 71
Not Specified 0

Board Information

Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 88%
Written Board Selection Criteria --
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy --
Percentage of Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions 30%
Board Orientation Yes

CEO Comments

The Conservancy is governed by a 21-member governing body (17-member Board of Directors and 4 Benefactor Members.) As a whole, the Board has responsibility for overall governance of our organization and determining policy in the areas of conservation, education, and recreation programs, human resources, finance, development, community relations, operations, and strategic planning. The Conservancy strives to create a diverse board consisting of a mixture of experience, skills, strengths, relationships, and leadership qualities. All of our Board members possess qualities that support our mission, vision, and goals.

· In addition to quarterly board meetings, directors and executive staff work together on a series of standing committees to address specific aspects of organizational governance. Standing committees include development/fundraising, facilities/capital projects, finance, investment and board governance. Conservancy Directors and Benefactor Members are volunteers, and are not compensated for their time.

Directors are elected and hold office for a term of three (3) years, and may not serve more than two consecutive three-year terms. They are eligible for re-appointment to the Board following one year after the completion of a second term. As a guideline, Board members will give and get a minimum of $25,000 annually. Additionally, they are expected to participate in the annual Conservancy Ball and Catalina: The Wild Side Art Show and Sale at the sponsorship level. The Board’s yearly giving, unrestricted or restricted, is an important component of our annual operating revenue. We receive full (100%) board support, in terms of annual giving. Overall, our Directors are key to the success of our organization, and make substantial contributions of time, talent, and treasure.

Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

  • Audit
  • Board Governance
  • Capital Campaign
  • Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
  • Executive
  • Finance
  • Investment

Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2015 (%)

Fiscal Year Jan 01, 2019 to Dec 31, 2019
Projected Revenue $11,017,181.00
Projected Expenses $10,548,903.00
Form 990s

2017 Form 990

2016 Form 990

2015 Form 990

2014 Form 990

2013 Form 990

2012 Form 990

Audit Documents

2017 2017 Audit

IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Revenue $15,359,223 $11,927,062 $22,758,258
Total Expenses $10,609,389 $10,405,203 $10,103,455

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$4,687,689 $4,594,841 $12,691,320
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- $0
Individual Contributions -- -- --
Indirect Public Support -- -- $0
Earned Revenue $8,775,498 $5,389,837 $5,249,900
Investment Income, Net of Losses $814,275 $1,511,723 $890,106
Membership Dues $231,806 -- $254,345
Special Events $403,032 -- $464,506
Revenue In-Kind $354,086 -- $0
Other $92,837 $430,661 $419,527

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Program Expense $8,016,014 $5,659,402 $7,324,747
Administration Expense $1,548,093 $4,745,801 $1,370,202
Fundraising Expense $1,045,282 -- $1,408,506
Payments to Affiliates -- -- $0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 1.45 1.15 2.25
Program Expense/Total Expenses 76% 54% 72%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 21% 0% 11%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Total Assets $90,344,606 $80,774,666 $78,472,635
Current Assets $8,494,442 -- $10,623,266
Long-Term Liabilities $1,527,891 $4,114,545 $1,919,795
Current Liabilities $3,242,622 -- $2,354,615
Total Net Assets $85,574,093 $76,660,121 $74,198,225

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities 2.62 nan 4.51

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2017 2016 2015
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 2% 5% 2%
Endowment Value $58,164,000.00
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign Purpose IMAGINE CATALINA: complete construction of Trailhead Visitor Center, complete Trekking Catalina, and West End Planning. Trekking Catalina is already complete
Campaign Goal $17,900,000.00
Capital Campaign Dates Mar 2015 - 2019
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount $16,956,334.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financial statements and Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

IMAGINE CATALINA campaign deck (2018)

No Other Documents currently available.