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Esperanza

 7455 Arroyo Crossing Parkway, Suite 220
 LAS VEGAS, NV 89113
[P] (702) 625-3892
[F] (702) 448-8993
--
[email protected]
Julie  Zepeda, [email protected]
FOUNDED: 2011
INCORPORATED: 2011
 Printable 1 Page Summary
 Printable Profile
Organization DBA Esperanza - Beauty in Hope of a cure for ovarian cancer
Former Names --
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Employer Identification Number 30-0655256 00000

Summary


Mission StatementMORE »

To raise awareness, fund research, for early prevention, and early detection of ovarian cancer to benefiting all women.

Mission Statement

To raise awareness, fund research, for early prevention, and early detection of ovarian cancer to benefiting all women.

FinancialsMORE »

Fiscal Year 2019
Projected Expenses $262,380.00
Projected Revenue $110,000.00

ProgramsMORE »

  • Woman to Woman
  • Survivors Teaching Students

Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2018 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.


Overview


Mission Statement

To raise awareness, fund research, for early prevention, and early detection of ovarian cancer to benefiting all women.

Background Statement

Esperanza was established as a 501 (c) (3) organization in 2011. Headquarters in NV and its operating site in Orange County, CA. Our purpose is to raise awareness, fund research, for early prevention, and early detection of ovarian cancer to benefit all women.

Statistics
In the United States, doctors must report any diagnosis of cancer to a state registry. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2018, about 22,240 new cases of ovarian cancer will be diagnosed and 14,070 women will die of ovarian cancer in the United States. Mortality rates for ovarian cancer have declined only slightly in the forty years since the “War on Cancer” was declared. However, other cancers have shown a much greater reduction in mortality, due to many factors. Ovarian cancer accounts for 2.5 percent of cancers in women.

While the 11th most common cancer among women, ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death among women, and is the deadliest of gynecologic cancers. Mortality rates are slightly higher for Caucasian women than for African-American women.

A Woman’s Lifetime Risk
A woman’s lifetime risk of developing invasive ovarian cancer is 1 in 79. A woman’s lifetime risk of dying from invasive ovarian cancer is 1 in 109.

Age
Ovarian cancer rates are highest in women aged 55-64 years. The median age at which women are diagnosed is 63, meaning that half of women are younger than 63 when diagnosed with ovarian cancer and half are older.

In 2018, there will be approximately 22,240 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed and 14,070 ovarian cancer deaths in the US. Ovarian cancer accounts for just 2.5% of all female cancer cases, but 5% of cancer deaths because of the disease's low survival.

We fund scientists and physicians at every stage of their career who are working in the best research institutions across the country. Esperanza research grants help them better understand the origins and biology of the disease, find new ways to identify and prevent it, and discover more effective treatments. They are the best and brightest working in the field today.

Why are some women more likely to get ovarian cancer than others? Why does ovarian cancer often come back after initial treatment? Why do some treatments work well in some women, but not well in others? Only research will help us find the answers to these critical questions.

In spite of the pressing need, ovarian cancer research is under-funded. Government funding for ovarian cancer research has been stagnant for many years– and when factoring in inflation, funding has actually declined over the last several years. Less than six cents of every dollar spent on health in the U.S. is spent on research to prevent, cure and treat disease, while 31 cents per dollar is spent on hospital care. We are committed to financing cutting-edge medical research at this important time. Scientists are on the threshold of many important new discoveries. New tools and technologies, along with an ever-increasing understanding of the molecular basis and origins of the disease, offer extraordinary scientific opportunities to make progress in ovarian cancer research.

Impact Statement

Esperanza’s Impact is to fund the most innovative and promising science, resulting in research breakthroughs that have advanced our understanding of ovarian cancer, how it starts and new treatment options, and to successfully advocate for federal research dollars and provide critical patient support and resources. Ovarian cancer survivors can shape the future of ovarian cancer research by serving as research advocates. Research advocates help funding agencies and scientists understand and prioritize the questions that are important to the ovarian cancer community. Having the input of survivors ensures that research is patient-focused and truly meets the needs of our community. Research advocates also report back to the community, sharing what they have learned, so that everyone can benefit from scientific progress.



Above all, Esperanza cares! From supporting cutting-edge research, to making sure you have access to the care you need and connecting you with other women who share your journey, Esperanza is uniting to fight ovarian cancer. We want to have the most up to date information on ovarian cancer, as well as trusted and evidence-based data that can help through their journey.

Esperanza is here to help while you are making your way through all of the information and decisions that come along with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Here to Help Here for you. Women to Woman is a unique support program that pairs gynecologic cancer patients with trained survivor volunteers who provide one-on-one emotional support and mentoring to women that need it most. From the moment of diagnosis through the end of treatment, Woman to Woman survivor volunteers have helped hundreds of women and their families cope with gynecologic cancer.

Survivor volunteers meet one-on-one with the patients with whom they are matched to listen, discuss concerns, provide advice and support, and sometimes, just hold a hand. Volunteers are carefully matched to new patients based on cancer type, age, language and culture, patient preferences, as well as other relevant factors. They are professionally trained and supervised by a coordinator who also oversees the program (typically a hospital social worker or nurse practitioner). During their intensive training session, volunteers learn active listening, communication skills, and how to address cultural differences. In addition, they receive an overview of gynecologic cancers and the issues associated with them, and gain an understanding of their own relationship to their illness as they prepare to volunteer. These survivor volunteers give hope, along with the special insights that can only come from someone with their own personal gynecologic cancer experience.

Being diagnosed with ovarian cancer is overwhelming. The newly diagnosed have a lot of unanswered questions. A cancer diagnosis can be devastating for your friends and family. This diagnosis can come at a time when you are establishing your independence from family and redefining your connections with parents, family members and friends. It is important to surround yourself with people who support you in this trying time. Allow your family and/or friends to be involved in your cancer journey. In fact, studies have shown that young women who have support through their treatment are less likely to suffer from depression and isolation.

Needs Statement

Our purpose: to support scientific research as it relates to the causes, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and cure for ovarian cancer; to provide education about ovarian cancer; to promote, advocate for and provide supportive services to persons affected by ovarian cancer; and to foster alliances to further those purposes.

To keep up the fight and change the future of ovarian cancer, we are in need of operating expenses:

To further the purpose, we are in need of $262,380.00 grant money for operating expenses:

Technology $2,750
Office Expense 2,600
Intern Stipend at 11 x 150 hrs = 1,650.00 x2 interns = $3,300
Employee Salaries 201,400
Employee Benefits 35,000
Employee Taxes 17, 330
Total $262,380.00

CEO Statement

By directing the overall strategy, operations and fundraising to promote progress and awareness, while hastening breakthroughs in diagnostics and treatments with the ultimate goal of finding a cure for cancer is a passionate and rewarding path to eradicate this disease.

Board Chair Statement

To lead with determination to support, and guide, and to implement strategies with cutting edge research available today, by top researches in the medical field, is by far the most fulfilling work in my career.

Other Ways to Donate/Volunteer

Make a Gift, Workplace Giving, Corporate Support, Stocks and Other Gifts, Legacy Giving, Fundraise for Esperanza, Phone Donations, In-Kind Donation of Office Space, Computers, Real Estate Donation. Event Volunteers. Internships Available.

Geographic Area Served

South Orange County
The Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve is an approximately 1,300 acre coastal estuary. Habitats include open water, mudflats, salt marsh, coastal dunes, seabird nesting islands, riparian, and freshwater marsh. More than 200 avian species have been identified at Bolsa Chica.

September is ovarian cancer research month.
Esperanza - Beauty in Hope of a cure for ovarian cancer and the inaugural walk, proved to be an outstanding success, in collaboration with Amigos de Bolsa Chica Wetlands and in partnership with the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund.

Organization Categories

  1. Medical Research - Fund Raising & Fund Distribution
  2. Science & Technology - Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis
  3. Public & Societal Benefit - Alliances & Advocacy

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Programs


Woman to Woman

Esperanza and its Woman to Woman program is a unique support project that pairs gynecologic cancer patients with trained survivor volunteers who provide one-on-one emotional support and mentoring to women when they need it most. From the moment of diagnosis through the end of treatment, Woman to Woman survivor volunteers have helped hundreds of women and their families cope with gynecologic cancer.

Survivor volunteers meet one-on-one with the patients with whom they are matched to listen, discuss concerns, provide advice and support, and sometimes, just hold a hand. Volunteers are carefully matched to new patients based on cancer type, age, language and culture, patient preferences, as well as other relevant factors. They are professionally trained and supervised by a coordinator who also oversees the program (typically a hospital social worker or nurse practitioner). During their intensive training session, volunteers learn active listening, communication skills, and how to address cultural differences. In addition, they receive an overview of gynecologic cancers and the issues associated with them, and gain an understanding of their own relationship to their illness as they prepare to volunteer. These survivor volunteers give hope, along with the special insights that can only come from someone with their own personal gynecologic cancer experience.
Budget  276,000
Category  Medical Research, General/Other Women's Cancer Research
Population Served Females People/Families of People with Cancer Minorities
Program Short-Term Success 
A  goal is to develop a 2019 Esperanza - Beauty in hope fundraiser, Walking to raise awareness of early detection and prevention held in high esteem.
 
Program Long-Term Success 
We fund scientists and physicians at every stage of their career who are working in the best research institutions across the country. Esperanza research grants help them better understand the origins and biology of the disease, find new ways to identify and prevent it, and discover more effective treatments. They are the best and brightest working in the field today.
Why are some women more likely to get ovarian cancer than others? Why does ovarian cancer often come back after initial treatment? Why do some treatments work well in some women, but not well in others? Only research will help us find the answers to these critical questions.
In spite of the pressing need, ovarian cancer research is under-funded. Government funding for ovarian cancer research has been stagnant for many years– and when factoring in inflation, funding has actually declined over the last several years. Less than six cents of every dollar spent on health in the U.S. is spent on research to prevent, cure and treat disease, while 31 cents per dollar is spent on hospital care.
Esperanza plays a critical role in the fight against ovarian cancer, along with the largest and oldest non-profit funder of ovarian cancer research in the United States, we are committed to financing cutting-edge medical research at this important time. Scientists are on the threshold of many important new discoveries. New tools and technologies, along with an ever-increasing understanding of the molecular basis and origins of the disease, offer extraordinary scientific opportunities to make progress in ovarian cancer research.
 
Program Success Monitored By 
Through a series of surveys, interviews, and literature reviews the World Ovarian Cancer Coalition produced a report that detailed their findings and recommendations. Their study spanned the world, 44 countries, and collected responses from 1531 women. Of those women, all had been diagnosed with ovarian cancer on or after January 2013, and about one third of them were diagnosed with epithelial serous ovarian cancer.
The report is broken down into four main areas of focus: awareness, diagnosis, family history, and specialist treatments. The Expert Advisory Panel for the study acknowledged that the participants tended to be younger, from developed countries, and had an above average socioeconomic status but they were able to learn a great deal from the data. For example, before their own diagnosis, over two thirds of participants knew very little or nothing about ovarian cancer. “The panel were shocked by the lack of knowledge of the disease worldwide,” states the report, which led to the conclusion that, “raising awareness of the disease and key symptoms is essential to reducing unacceptable delays in diagnosis…”
 
Examples of Program Success 
Through funded research we identified a new therapeutic approach for patients with clear cell ovarian cancer, found two new genetic variants linked to ovarian cancer,
better understood the link between hypertension and ovarian cancer,
discovered how a new gene mutation may spur ovarian cancer growth, and
found a new target for future immunotherapy studies.
 
The results of collaborative-supported research projects have been published in some of the world’s most prestigious journals, such as: Gynecologic Oncology, Lancet Oncology, New England Journal of Medicine, Cancer Research, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Science Translational Medicine, Cancer Discovery and Nature.

Survivors Teaching Students

Survivors Teaching Students brings ovarian cancer survivors and caregivers into medical education programs to educate future healthcare providers about ovarian cancer by sharing stories of diagnosis, treatment and survivorship, along with facts about the disease. Medical/healthcare students interact with and learn from ovarian cancer survivors in a classroom setting.
Budget  150,000
Category  Medical Research, General/Other Women's Cancer Research
Population Served Females People/Families of People with Cancer Minorities
Program Short-Term Success  To introduce the Survivors teaching Students project in Orange County, CA.
Program Long-Term Success  Offered in over 281 health care programs. In 35 states, District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, UK, Canada, and Australia.
Program Success Monitored By 
In 2017, reaching over 11,100 students and staffed by more than 800 survivor volunteers.
Examples of Program Success  --

Management


CEO/Executive Director Julie Zepeda
CEO Term Start --
CEO Email [email protected]
CEO Experience --

Former CEOs and Terms

Name Start End
-- -- --

Senior Staff

Name Title Experience/Biography
-- -- --

Awards

Award Awarding Organization Year
-- -- --

Affiliations

Affiliation Year
-- --

External Assessments and Accreditations

External Assessment or Accreditation Year
-- --

Collaborations

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Staff Information

Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate % 100%
Staff Professional Development Yes

Staff Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: --
Asian American/Pacific Islander: --
Caucasian: --
Hispanic/Latino: --
Native American/American Indian: --
Other: --
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: --
Male: --
Not Specified --

Plans & Policies

Organization has Fundraising Plan? --
Organization has Strategic Plan? --
Years Strategic Plan Considers --
Management Succession Plan --
Organization Policies And Procedures --
Business Continuity of Operations Plan --

Risk Management Provisions

Nondiscrimination Policy --
Whistle Blower Policy --
Document Destruction Policy --
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy --

Reporting and Evaluations

Management Reports to Board? --
CEO Formal Evaluation and Frequency -- --
Senior Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency -- --
Non Management Formal Evaluation and Frequency -- --

Government Licenses

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CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Governance


Board Chair Julie Zepeda
Board Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Chair Term -
Board Co-Chair --
Board Co-Chair Company Affiliation --
Board Co-Chair Term -

Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
Roger Harris Community Volunteer Voting

Constituent Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Youth Board Members

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Additional Board Members and Affiliations

Name Company Affiliations Status
-- -- --

Board Demographics

Ethnicity African American/Black: 20
Asian American/Pacific Islander: 20
Caucasian: 20
Hispanic/Latino: 20
Native American/American Indian: 5
Other: 15
Other (if specified): --
Gender Female: 80
Male: 0
Not Specified 20

Board Information

Board Term Lengths --
Board Term Limits --
Board Meeting Attendance % --
Written Board Selection Criteria --
Written Conflict Of Interest Policy --
Percentage of Monetary Contributions --
Percentage of In-Kind Contributions --
Board Orientation --

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

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Standing Committees

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Financials


Revenue vs. Expense ($000s)

Expense Breakdown 2018 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2017 (%)

Expense Breakdown 2016 (%)

Fiscal Year Aug 01, 2018 to July 31, 2019
Projected Revenue $110,000.00
Projected Expenses $262,380.00
Form 990s

2018 990s

2017 990s

2016 990N

Audit Documents --
IRS Letter of Exemption

IRS Letter of Determination

Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Total Revenue $2,180 $5,602 $4,503
Total Expenses $2,210 $5,702 $4,963

Prior Three Years Revenue Sources

Revenue By Revenue Source
Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
-- -- --
Government Contributions $0 $0 $0
    Federal -- -- --
    State -- -- --
    Local -- -- --
    Unspecified -- -- --
Individual Contributions $2,180 $5,602 $4,503
Indirect Public Support -- -- --
Earned Revenue -- -- --
Investment Income, Net of Losses -- -- --
Membership Dues -- -- --
Special Events -- -- --
Revenue In-Kind -- -- --
Other -- -- --

Prior Three Years Expense Allocations

Expense By Type
Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Program Expense $1,768 $4,562 $3,970
Administration Expense $442 $1,140 $993
Fundraising Expense -- -- --
Payments to Affiliates -- -- --
Total Revenue/Total Expenses 0.99 0.98 0.91
Program Expense/Total Expenses 80% 80% 80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue 0% 0% 0%

Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities

Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Total Assets $4,500 $6,525 --
Current Assets $4,500 $6,525 --
Long-Term Liabilities -- -- --
Current Liabilities -- -- --
Total Net Assets $4,500 $6,525 --

Short Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities inf inf nan

Long Term Solvency

Fiscal Year 2018 2017 2016
Long-term Liabilities/Total Assets 0% 0% nan%
Endowment Value --
Spending Policy --
Percentage(If selected) --
Are you currently in a Capital Campaign? --
Capital Campaign Purpose --
Campaign Goal --
Capital Campaign Dates -
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount --
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? --

CEO Comments

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Foundation Comments

Summary financial data is per the audited financial statements and Form 990s and consultation with the organization. Foundation/corporate and individual contributions are combined under Foundation and Corporation Contributions.

Documents


Other Documents

No Other Documents currently available.